2013-2019 Kentucky Marijuana Bills

THE TIMELINE OF KENTUCKY MARIJUANA BILLS 2013-2019

kyusmjparty1

2019

HCR121(BR-1186)

Tuesday, February 19, 2019 – introduced in House

Moser , Kimberly Poore

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION establishing the Medicinal Marijuana Task Force.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/19RS/hcr121.html

SB 80(BR-836)

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 – introduced in Senate

Sen. Dan Seum [R]
Sen. Perry Clark [D]

AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.  (Adult recreational use)

https://legiscan.com/KY/bill/SB80/2019

HB 136(BR-58)

Wednesday, January 9, 2019 – introduced in House

MULTIPLE SPONSORS

AN ACT relating to medicinal marijuana and making an appropriation therefor.

https://legiscan.com/KY/bill/HB136/2019

SB 82(BR-834)/LM/CI

Friday, January 11, 2019 – introduced in Senate

Jimmy Higdon

Create a new section of KRS Chapter 218A to make the penalty for possession of a personal use quantity of marijuana a prepayable non-criminal fine;

https://legiscan.com/KY/bill/SB82/2019

SB 170(BR-804)/LM/CI

Tuesday, February 12, 2019 – introduced in Senate

Sen. Steve West [R]
Sen. Dan Seum [R]
Sen. Perry Clark [D]
Sen. C.B. Embry [R]

Sen. Denise Harper Angel [D]

AN ACT relating to medicinal marijuana and making an appropriation therefor.

https://legiscan.com/KY/bill/SB170/2019

HCR5(BR-180)

Tuesday, January 8, 2019 – introduced in House

Rep. Danny Bentley [R]
Rep. Kimberly Moser [R]
Rep. Lynn Bechler [R]
Rep. Robert Goforth [R]

Rep. Mark Hart [R]
Rep. Kim King [R]
Rep. Melinda Prunty [R]
Rep. Steve Sheldon [R]

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION calling for the expediting of research regarding the safety and efficacy of the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

https://legiscan.com/KY/bill/HCR5/2019

2018

SB 80

01/17/18 introduced in Senate

D. Seum, P. Clark

AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis. (Adult Use)

This past week in Frankfort, State Senator Dan Seum of Fairdale, Ky. — who represents Bullitt County and a portion of Jefferson County in Senate District 38 — introduced Senate Bill 80, which seeks to allow full and regulated cannabis use in Kentucky.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/18rs/sb80.html

HB 166

01/10/18  introduced in House

J. Sims Jr, G. Brown Jr, T. Burch, M. Cantrell, J. Donohue, K. Flood, A. Gentry, J. Gooch Jr., D. Graham, J. Greer, C. Harris, A. Hatton, T. Herald, J. Jenkins, M. Marzian, J. Miller, C. Morgan, R. Nelson, J. Nemes, R. Palumbo, R. Rand, D. Schamore, A. Scott, S. Wells, S. Westrom

AN ACT relating to medical cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/18rs/hb166.html

A bill to legalize medical marijuana in Kentucky was shelved Wednesday after it ran into strong opposition from law enforcement officials during a round of testimony before a legislative panel.

A day after hearing from medical marijuana supporters, the panel took comments from law enforcement officials and a Warren County prosecutor. They warned that legalization could exacerbate Kentucky’s drug addiction woes. LINK

SB 272

03/01/18 introduced in Senate

M. McGarvey,                                                                                                                       R. Thomas

AN ACT relating to medical marijuana

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/Record/18RS/sb272.html

SB 118

01/30/18 introduced in Senate

S. West, D. Seum, P. Clark, C. Embry Jr., D. Harper Angel, M. McGarvey, G. Neal, R. Thomas

AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/Record/18RS/SB118.html


2017

SB 76/CI/LM (BR 408)

Dec 09, 2016 – Prefiled by the sponsor(s).
Jan 03, 2017 – introduced in Senate

P. Clark

AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

Establish KRS Chapter 245 to regulate the cultivation, testing, processing, taxing, and sale of cannabis to persons aged 21 years and older; create, amend, and repeal various sections to conform.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/Record/17RS/SB76.htm

SB 57/CI/LM (BR 409)

Dec 06, 2016 – Prefiled by the sponsor(s).
Jan 03, 2017 – introduced in Senate

P. Clark, D. Harper Angel, S. West

AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/Record/17RS/SB57.htm

HB 411 (BR 1166)

02/16/17  introduced in House

J. Sims Jr, A. Gentry, D. Johnson, A. Simpson

AN ACT relating to the medical use of marijuana.

Create a new section of KRS Chapter 311 to allow physicians to recommend use of cannabis; hold physicians harmless for making the recommendation.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/17rs/hb411.html

 SB 243 (BR 1469)

02/16/17  introduced in Senate

M. McGarvey

AN ACT relating to medical marijuana for palliative or end of life care.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/17rs/sb243.html

2016

*March 2, 2016

On Wednesday, March 2, Sen. Perry Clark of Louisville introduced two new Bills, one for Hemp and another for medical marijuana.

Senate Bill 262 is AN ACT relating to industrial hemp.

Senate Bill 263 is AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

*March 1, 2016

HB 584 AN ACT relating to the medical use of marijuana in Kentucky

Introduced March 1, 2016

HB 584(BR-1994)

*January 6, 2016

SB 13, Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Act

Introduced on January 6, 2016

LINK TO PDF OF SB13

2015

*February 5, 2015

HB 305/CI (BR 395) – B. Yonts

Introduced on February 5, 2015

AN ACT relating to crimes and punishments.
Amend and create various KRS sections to convert certain misdemeanors to pre-payable violations and set fines.

Feb 5-Introduced in House

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/15rs/hb305.html

SB 79/CI (BR 805) – P. Clark

Introduced on January 9, 2015

AN ACT relating to marijuana.

Amend KRS 218A.1422 to make the possession of two ounces of marijuana or less a violation punishable by a maximum fine of $75; amend KRS 218A.1423 to make cultivation of five marijuana plants or less a Class B misdemeanor; name the Act the Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Act.

Jan 9-Introduced in Senate
Feb 3-to Judiciary (S)

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/15rs/sb79.html

HB 3

Introduced on January 6, 2015

House Speaker Greg Stumbo’s medical marijuana bill wasn’t going to pass this year anyway, he said Thursday, so his House Bill 3 is likely dead after no vote was taken in a committee hearing.

“Gatewood Galbraith Medical Cannabis Act”;

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/15rs/hb3.html

2014

SB124

2014-02-05      Senate introduced in Senate

2014-04-10      Senate signed by Governor (Acts, ch. 112)

Legislators did make an effort to help some seriously ill patients who could benefit from cannabidiol (“CBD,” a non-psychoactive component of marijuana). On Thursday, April 10, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear signed into law a proposal that is intended to allow patients to use CBD if directed to do so by a physician.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/14rs/sb124.html

SB 43

Medical Marijuana Bill Kentucky 2015, SB 43/LM/CI (BR 287)

Introduced on January 7, 2014

AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

Cannabis Compassion Act.

Jan 7-introduced in Senate
Jan 13-to Licensing, Occupations, & Administrative Regulations (S)

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/14rs/sb43.html

2013

SB 11

*January 8, 2013

Senator Perry Clark submitted SB11 to the judiciary committee last week

Introduced on January 8, 2013

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/13rs/sb11.html

Create various new sections of KRS Chapter 218A to establish a comprehensive system for medical marijuana in Kentucky

Greetings   Well the bill has been submitted and now it’s our turn. Senator Perry Clark submitted SB11 to the judiciary committee last week. http://www.mpp.org/states/kentucky/  It is one of the most aggressive legalization bills to date and we are asking all supporters to get on board to help us push this bill through.   You can see a summary of the bill here: http://kentuckyveteransformedicalmarijua.blogspot.com/2012/09/gatewood-galbraith-memorial-medical.html
In the coming days I will be sending out information on what needs to be done. We will also be sending out another petition so be sure to sign it as we will be using it to further the legislation along.   This is a short session folks but I know that working together we can get this done. I would like to hear from any veterans we might have, especially if you belong to the VFW. There is big news concerning the VA.
Folks I am excited about our chances. I’m hearing more and more positive feedback from legislators every day. We are getting closer to making this bill a reality. If you have any questions you may contact me here at kyveteransformedicalmarijuan@gmail.com     United, We Stand!   Ron Moore Kentucky Veterans for Medical Marijuana   www.kentuckyveteransformedicalmarijuana.net     Find your legislator at this link: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/whoswho/email.htm
or Call the Toll-Free Legislative Message Line at 1-800-372-7181 to leave a message.

Legislation introduced to legalize marijuana in Kentucky

LINK:  http://www.wave3.com/story/18961002/legislation-introduced-to-legalize-marijuana-in-kentucky

FRANKFORT, KY (WAVE) – Kentucky Sen. Perry B. Clark introduced legislation that would make marijuana a legal drug for doctors to prescribe.

Thursday afternoon, the Louisville Democrat held a news conference at the Capitol Annex in Frankfort to introduce the Gatewood Galbraith Memorial Medical Marijuana Act. Clark was joined at the news conference by Galbraith’s daughter, Molly Galbraith, and other supporters of medical marijuana.

They said medical research has proven it has many benefits for everything from Parkinson’s disease to tumor regression, prostate cancer, nausea and pain.

Gatewood Galbraith, a perennial candidate for governor of Kentucky and an outspoken proponent of the legalization of marijuana, privacy rights and other civil liberties died at his home near Lexington in January at the age of 64.

Twenty states have approved some type of medical marijuana usage and several other states have similar legislation pending.

Copyright 2012 WAVE News. All rights reserved.

(KY) Please Call Your Legislators!

ky 2019

To ALL Kentucky Citizens,

The time is now to contact your Legislators concerning the Cannabis Bills, and any other Bills which you are concerned about!  The phone number to call is:

1-800-372-7181

Here are the current Cannabis Bills:

SB 80 / Dan Malano Seum / Establishes the “Department of Cannabis Control” which will oversee lawful consumption of Cannabis in Kentucky by adults 21 and over.

HB 136 / Establishes a very strict “Medical Cannabis” bill for bonified Patients.

SB 83 / Perry B. Clark “Shauna’s Law”  Relating to a drug free workplace / Seeks to mandate an appeals process for those employer’s who enforce drug-testing upon their employee’s which will address those persons who have been found in violation of the drug-free workplace policy by testing positive on random drug screens for legal Hemp products such as CBD. It would set aside that violation if proven that a legal product had been used.

SB 82 / J. Higdon / to make the penalty for possession of a personal use quantity of marijuana a prepayable non-criminal fine;

SB 57 / J. Higdon / to allow discretionary expungement of Class D felonies with a ten-year waiting period;

legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2019/01/13/kentucky-will-march-to-the-capital-once-again/

Kentucky Will March To The Capital, Once Again…

gatewood rainbow farm

Rainbow Farm was located in Vandalia, Michigan & was a cannabis friendly community. They had great concerts & speakers. The government came in later & killed the owners & stole the farm from the legal birth right of the son, Robert, 1 week before 9-11 (September 3rd & 4th,2001). Tom Crosslin & Rollie Rolhm were the owners & each one of them were systematically gunned down & tortured after being out numbered 300 to 1. In order to stop a memorial day concert, that was to start a signature campaign to legalize cannabis in the state of Michigan.

                                          ——————————–

1/13/2019

ShereeKrider

The Country as a whole has come a long way since the incident above in 2001, but it still has a very long way to go.  We have 11 “legalized States” and 33 “medicinal States” to date according to NORML.  More than the majority of Americans believe it should be made “lawful”.  Many sick people including children are suffering needlessly and we have the ability to help rectify the situation.

We should not still have to be going to the Capital in Frankfort to beg for something that we should have had in Kentucky more than seven years ago.  In fact, it never should have been “unlawful” to possess in the first place.

Gatewood Galbraith, “The greatest Governor that Kentucky never had”, spoke to this issue many times and had he been elected we would not still be in this same fight today.  He said, “You have got to get political.  Because if you don’t get political then I’m gonna die in the streets!” 

The number of people who are dying in the streets has exponentially increased in the past 5+ years in earnest.  The crisis was started by the Government and their Pharmaceutical cronies who promoted highly addictive opioid drugs for daily use to patients who were suffering and  they bit the bait.  After everyone was sufficiently addicted to the pharmaceuticals the Government claimed an “opioid crisis” and immediately withdrew these needed medications by way of intimidating the Physicians and forced drug testing to the point that the Medical Establishment could no longer take the chance of losing their Practice’s, and so they immediately withdrew needed medicines from Patients who legitimately needed them, as well as other’s who had become addicted for other reasons – and there are many reasons…  This in turn caused people to literally die in the streets due to a dire need to medicate and the ample supply in the streets of much more potent and deadly drugs than what the Physicians had been prescribing them to begin with.

Some of us were strong enough and smart enough to turn to Cannabis which saved our lives, even though it is illegal.  A lot of us have lost close friends and family members to this ‘war on drugs’.  Many of us grieve daily because of it.

There have been Senators, Representatives and Citizen Activists, working hard to see Cannabis regulation and lawfulness is passed in the very State that in WWII the Government pleaded with people to grow Hemp for their War efforts.  The people responded to their requests in a time of need.  However, the Government turns their heads the other way when the Citizens request that they help them establish a safe and lawful way to use Cannabis, medically and otherwise.  Not only would this help the multitudes of patients who direly need this medication, it would also establish a lawful product that can be taxed and used for the greater good of the State we reside in, including new businesses and employment.  As a result, even those who chose not to partake in Cannabis would benefit from the legalization and taxation of the  product – much like alcohol – with much less lawlessness than alcohol promotes…

It would establish a lawful alternative to Alcohol and Tobacco and other illicit drugs, such as street level opioids which are destroying families and responsible for unending deaths even as we speak.  Yet, to date, our Kentucky Government has refused to act upon this issue. 

Why has Kentucky Government taken such a path in governing of the people?

“Petrochemical-Pharmaceutical-Military-Industrial-Transnational-Corporate-Fascist-Elite-Bastards”  LINK

For a more in-depth read on why and how our Country has fell into the hands of the NWO you can view this LINK.  “The Elkhorn Manifesto” is an archived page of the Kentucky Marijuana Party, written in 1996 by R. William Davis, and collaborated with Gatewood Galbraith. 

Here we are, once again, in the year of Our Lord, 2019, begging for our leaders to hear our plea’s.  And once again, they will try to ignore us! 

As far as I am concerned, the lawfulness of Cannabis should first have been rightfully returned to the people through REPEAL of Federal Treaties and Statutes which made it unlawful to begin with.  Possibly as far back as the 1914 Harrison Narcotics Tax Act.  However, the situation has been taken into the hands of the individual States and their “States Rights” because the Federal Government refused to stand up for the rights of our people.  Instead they have enlisted a “New World Order” to do their dirty work which seeks to contain society at large – world wide control of the masses, control of all plants, food, medicines,  WATER, etc., to be placed under strict guidelines to which we must abide by the rules or suffer the consequences.

We have become damned if we do submit to the law and damned if we do not follow it as well. 

There is  research already out there and patients are being helped and in some cases literally saved from an early death by using Cannabis.  Many people have been saved from addiction by using Cannabis. 

We cannot wait another year to change the Cannabis Statutes in Kentucky.  We need it now.  We needed it 20 years ago.

There are currently two Bills in Kentucky Legislature – one in Senate and one in the House.  Both bills should be passed and this is my reasoning for this:

SB 80 / Dan Malano Seum / Establishes the “Department of Cannabis Control” which will oversee lawful consumption of Cannabis in Kentucky by adults 21 and over.  This Bill gives limited and controlled freedom back to the people in that it does allow for growing on our own property and consumption as well as sets the stage for business to be lawful throughout Kentucky.  This legislation could be enacted fairly quickly and jumpstart the economy here.  It is imperative that we implement this legislation this year if we seek to make our State livable again.

HB 136 / Establishes a very strict “Medical Cannabis” bill for bonified Patients.  Because of the nature of illnesses and the fact that many Children could be served by this Bill it is imperative that “medicinal Cannabis” be made available in Kentucky to those who are in need, medically, whether they be adult or child.  Many people who are not familiar with Cannabis and it’s use would serve to be protected as patients by this medical legislation.  The problem is that with the measures necessary to comply with the Bill as it is written it would most certainly be a slow process to set up across the State and reach all patients equally.   However, we should proceed immediately on this Act as well.

Additionally, a drug-free workplace Bill for the use of legal Hemp CBD products, currently sold on the open market:

SB 83 / Perry B. Clark “Shauna’s Law”  Relating to a drug free workplace / Seeks to mandate an appeals process for those employer’s who enforce drug-testing upon their employee’s which will address those persons who have been found in violation of the drug-free workplace policy by testing positive on random drug screens for legal Hemp products such as CBD.  It would set aside that violation if proven that a legal product had been used.  This Bill must be passed in order to preserve the integrity of the Hemp market as well as employee’s rights.

IF our Legislator’s  and Governor do not seek to enact the Bill’s which we as a People have requested  for our health and well-being in general, then the political system of the Commonwealth of Kentucky needs to be immediately and completely changed and replaced.  This would also include other issues of great importance in Kentucky such as the Pension Crisis.

The corruption in Kentucky runs far and wide and seeks to be ended this year.  The time is now for change…not later.  We cannot wait another year to be lawful!

7976961615_e1457307a6_m

http://antiquecannabisbook.com/Appendix/AppendixC.htm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1ggjadAnSg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Crosslin

http://rainbowfarmcamp.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5moSy-Ooouk&t=294s

https://www.kentucky.com/news/politics-government/article44148519.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5312634/

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/19RS/HB136/bill.pdf

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/19RS/SB80/bill.pdf

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/19RS/sb83/orig_bill.pdf

https://norml.org/states

https://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherburnham/2018/06/29/kentucky-retirement-systems-a-case-study-of-politicizing-pensions/#514247ce299a

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp_in_Kentucky

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gatewood_Galbraith

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/10/26/rights-and-freedoms-may-in-no-case-be-exercised-contrary-to-purposes-and-principles-of-the-united-nations-how-the-united-nations-is-stealing-our-unalienable-rights-to-grow/

(KY) Judge Weighs Whether Lawmakers Can Revive Dead Legislation

A Kentucky judge is questioning how the state legislature passed a pension overhaul bill that prompted thousands of teachers to protest.

June 7, 2018, at 4:13 p.m.

By ADAM BEAM, Associated Press

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP)Kentucky has lots of abandoned private sewer systems causing problems for homeowners. To fix this, a state lawmaker sponsored a bill to let local governments buy these systems, even if they are outside the government’s boundaries.

But when lawmakers gutted the 11-page sewer bill and replaced it with a 291-page overhaul of the state pension system, howls of protest echoed through the Capitol. Because the bill had technically already passed the Senate, lawmakers were able to send it to the governor’s desk in about six hours instead of the minimum five days the state Constitution requires to pass new legislation. The bill was not available for the public to read until the day after lawmakers passed it.

Lawmakers in Kentucky and state Capitols across the country routinely use this process to pass bills in the waning days of a legislative session, arguing it is sometimes the only way to pass complex and contentious legislation within the tight deadlines imposed by their state constitutions. But Thursday, a state judge questioned whether it was legal during a hearing on a lawsuit seeking to block the pension bill.

“We have a Lazarus problem here. How can you raise a bill from the dead without starting over?” Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd said.

Thursday’s hearing in the case to nullify the pension law was the first step in a legal process that will likely end at the state Supreme Court. The question of how lawmakers pass legislation could be the main issue. Shepherd indicated as much Thursday as he spent most of his time asking questions about the process and saying he had concerns about its effects on “open and transparent legislation.”

Lawmakers have been using this process for decades. In 2015, they turned a bill about prison health care into an anti-drug bill that increased penalties for heroin dealers and directed more money toward substance abuse treatment. In 2017, lawmakers turned a bill about dog bites into one that overhauled the University of Louisville’s broad of trustees as it was in a crisis over its accreditation.

David Fleenor, an attorney for Kentucky’s legislative leaders, noted lawmakers did not pull the pension bill out of thin air. The bill had previously been Senate bill 1, which had gone through the legislative process with public hearings but had gotten bogged down in the Senate. When lawmakers finally reached agreement to pass it, they did not have enough time left to do it the usual way.

“This is a citizen legislature that is there for a very finite period of time,” said David Fleenor, an attorney for Senate President Robert Stivers. “You need a mechanism to be able to do that.”

Stephen Pitt, an attorney for Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, warned if the court ruled this process was illegal it would open the door for countless other bills to be challenged. But Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear dismissed that as a “scare tactic.” He noted the same argument was used a few years ago in a lawsuit challenging the legislative practice of stopping the clock on the last day of the session to give lawmakers more time to pass bills. The court ruled that was illegal, and it did not result in a cascade of nullified laws.

Beshear argued the practice of gutting and replacing bills shuts out the public because the legislature moves so fast it does not give them a chance to participate.

“You call it a Lazarus situation, this is like a Walking Dead bill,” Beshear said. “You have to kill it twice.”

Teachers and other state workers packed the courtroom for Thursday’s hearing, some wearing red t-shirts that read “a pension is a promise.” Erin Grace, a 37-year-old teacher at Rockcastle County High School, said one way or another, the bill will be overturned.

“If it’s not overturned in court, we’re going to elect people that are going to reverse it as quickly as it was enacted,” she said.

CONTINUE READING…

(KY) SENATOR DAVID GIVENS’ LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

For Immediate Release

April 6, 2018

SENATOR DAVID GIVENS’ LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

After a productive 58th day of the 2018 Legislative Session that saw the passing of several significant bills to benefit the Commonwealth, we have now entered a 10-day “veto recess” where Governor Matt Bevin will have the opportunity to sign and veto bills passed by the Kentucky General Assembly. The most significant measures to pass on Monday, April 2, were a budget and a revenue bill that will dictate how our state collects and appropriates funding for the next two years.

Some of the budget highlights included historical funding levels for state education, including record-high SEEK per-pupil funding, in addition to funding SEEK transportation at historic levels. All the charter school funding language was also removed from the budget. We fully funded the Department of Veterans Affairs and the State Police and shored up our state’s pension systems, including the Teachers’ Retirement System, by fully funding them. This bill also ensures that retired teachers will see no health care premium increases or coverage decreases. Lastly, there are raises for our social workers who are on the front lines of taking care of our state’s most vulnerable.

Kentucky’s ailing pension systems have commanded significant funding increases in recent years and in order to honor our commitment to our retirement systems, we needed to come up with some added revenue to protect other vital government entities from funding reductions. Our approach decreased Kentucky’s tax income rate while broadening the tax base, a shift to a more consumption-based tax system which relies more on spending habits. This allows Kentuckians to keep more of their hard-earned income.

People have expressed concern to me that HB 366, the state’s revenue bill that also includes tax reform, raises the income tax on Kentucky’s most vulnerable. This is simply not the case. This proposal creates a flat income tax of five percent. If you make less than 133 percent of the poverty level (roughly around $18,000 or less) you are exempt from paying income taxes. If you make between $18,000-$75,000, your tax income tax rate will be lowered from 5.8 percent to five percent, keeping more money in the pockets of hard-working Kentuckians.

These are just a few of the biennium budget highlights, but ultimately our focus remained on fully funding education, providing for our public protectors, and ensuring our pension systems are fully funded. In our budget bill, we dedicated approximately $3.3 billion in funding, nearly 14 percent of the total budget, to help fund these ailing pension systems. We made a promise to our state employees, and these two bills help us keep that promise.

In addition to passing the Commonwealth’s budget and revenue bills, we passed a number of other measures this week. House Bill 1 is a comprehensive overhaul of Kentucky’s foster care and adoption system. More than 8,600 Kentucky children are now in foster care and awaiting permanent homes, and the need for such reform has been obvious for a long time. House Bill 1 includes major provisions that would expand the definition of blood relative for child placement.

The legislation would also require more case reviews for each child in foster care, create a “putative father registry” so that a child’s possible (but not verified) biological father can be notified of the child’s prospective adoption, and allow the state to seek termination of parental rights for new mothers who will not seek drug treatment after giving birth to a drug-addicted baby.

Senate changes to HB 1 that made it into the final bill include provisions that would protect a mother from losing her parental rights if she was properly prescribed and using medication that could have caused her newborn’s addiction. The amended bill would also clarify that foster parents and child placement agencies be given a 10-day notice before a foster child is reunited with his or her birth parents or placed in a new home.

Senate Bill 5 was also given final passage this week. This bill levels the playing field for small-town, locally-owned pharmacies. Senate Bill 5, as amended by the House, would make the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services in charge of setting the reimbursement rates for a pharmacist. The rate is currently set by pharmacy-benefit managers (PBMs) hired by the state’s Medicaid managed-care organizations (MCOs). Kentucky Medicaid spends $1.7 billion annually on prescriptions and SB 5 would help authorities track that money and determine whether locally-owned pharmacies were being reimbursed fairly.

We also passed House Bill 362, which allows for the phase-in of increased pension costs for local governments. Recently, the Kentucky Retirement Systems Board adjusted their assumptions to require cities, counties, and other quasi-governmental entities to increase their pension contributions. If those increased pension contribution costs were not phased in over time, several of these local governments would be at risk of bankruptcy.

Passage of major pension reform legislation in recent weeks allowed us to justify the decision to allow counties and cities to phase-in these costly pension contributions, which was the language passed in House Bill 362. While this measure represented a win for local governments and quasi-governmental entities, it reiterated the need for raising revenue through tax reform, as we did in House Bill 366.

There are only two days left in the 2018 Regular Session. We will reconvene for those final two days on Friday, April 13, and Saturday, April 14. Kentucky’s constitution requires the General Assembly to be adjourned by April 15, and since April 15 is a Sunday and we cannot constitutionally meet that day, we must finish the state’s business by midnight on April 14. It has been an honor to represent you and our district in Frankfort, and I thank you for engaging in the legislative process.

If you have any questions or comments about these issues or any other public policy issue, please call me toll-free at 1-800-372-7181.  You can also review the Legislature’s work online at www.lrc.ky.gov.

# # #

Note:  Senator David Givens (R-Greensburg) represents the 9th District including Allen, Barren, Green, Metcalfe, Monroe and Simpson Counties.  He serves as a member of the Appropriations and Revenue Committee, the Agriculture Committee, the Education Committee, the Enrollment Committee, and the Health and Welfare Committee. For a high-resolution .jpeg of Senator Givens, please log onto http://www.lrc.ky.gov/pubinfo/portraits/senate09.jpg.

Those who overdose on heroin or other opioid drugs in Kentucky’s largest population areas would be immediately detained by first responders and taken to a hospital under a bill that has passed the House.

For Immediate Release

March 20, 2018

Opioid overdose bill goes to Senate

FRANKFORT—Those who overdose on heroin or other opioid drugs in Kentucky’s largest population areas would be immediately detained by first responders and taken to a hospital under a bill that has passed the House.

House Bill 428, sponsored by Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, would specifically apply to overdose victims in Lexington, Louisville, or areas like Northern Kentucky where adjoining counties each have populations over 90,000.

Moser, who is the director of the Northern Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy, said the need for the bill was brought to her attention by first responders who she said are often called to resuscitate the same person for opioid overdose multiple times. Moser said there were over 15,100 emergency medical runs requiring resuscitation due to opioid overdoses in Kentucky last year, not counting more than 2,000 runs in Jefferson County alone.

First responders “brought this issue to me because they are unable to get the folks into treatment when they are resuscitated,” said Moser. “These folks wake up and they are able to just get up and walk away and refuse treatment” even though she said they may still be under the influence of drugs.

“They need to get to a hospital for stabilization, referral to treatment and further treatment and this is what this bill seeks to do,” said Moser.

Failure to receive appropriate treatment for opioid overdose often leads to death, with 1,404 deaths from opioid overdose reported in Kentucky in 2016 alone, said Moser.

“Death is a distinct possibility with opioid overdoses,” she said.

HB 428 passed the House on a 92-3 vote. It now goes to the Senate for its consideration.

–END–

Additionally,

For Immediate Release

March 21, 2018

Standards-for-treatment disorders bill goes to governor

FRANKFORT— A bill that would attack Kentucky’s opioid crisis through better state substance use disorder treatment and recovery program standards has received final passage in the Kentucky House.

House Bill 124, sponsored by House Health and Family Services Committee Chair Rep. Addia Wuchner, R-Florence, and Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, would require enhanced licensure and quality standards for substance use disorder treatment and recovery after a state review of current statewide standards, subject to available funding. Enhanced standards would cover residential, outpatient and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) services, according to the bill.

Wuchner said she has traveled the state visiting treatment and recovery centers and found that some programs have “a lot of dynamics and a lot of differences.”

“That doesn’t mean that every program has to be the same, but there should be components of that program that are consistent with best practices,” said Wuchner.

HB 124 was amended in the Senate on a 36-0 vote late last week to include FDA-approved MAT treatment for inmates who are opioid-dependent or who have other substance abuse disorders.

“As some of those products that are used for medically-assisted treatment come to market and come to bear, there are more products now that could be used in the corrections environment that minimize diversion, and that’s why this piece was added,” said Wuchner.

HB 124 received final passage in the House today on a vote of 93-0. The bill was initially passed in the House on an 85-2 vote in January. 

–END–

(KY) According to the Office of Drug Control Policy, in 2016, approximately 561,000 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $745,000 worth of assets were seized…

Dear Ms. Krider;

Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana. Your views help me represent Kentucky and the nation in the United States Senate, and I appreciate the opportunity to respond to your concerns.

In your correspondence, you expressed your thoughts on rescheduling marijuana from its current status as a Schedule I controlled substance. Kentuckians continue to combat the negative consequences associated with the cultivation and distribution of marijuana in communities across the state. According to the Office of Drug Control Policy, in 2016, approximately 561,000 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $745,000 worth of assets were seized, and more than 85 weapons were taken off the streets as a result of the marijuana eradication operations. Kentucky carries the dubious distinction of ranking as one of the top marijuana producing states in the nation. Traffickers have been known to trespass on both private and public lands, often resulting in damage to private property and many of the Commonwealth’s most cherished natural habitats.

That is one reason why I encouraged Gil Kerlikowske, then-Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, to tour Kentucky. Known as the country’s “drug czar,” Director Kerlikowske focused his attention on better understanding the scope of Kentucky’s drug problem in order to make an informed decision on how best to continue the federal government’s commitment to combating drugs in the Commonwealth within current resource limitations.

There is no doubt that drug abuse persists as a serious problem in all 120 counties of the Commonwealth, and the effects of such abuse have proved devastating for our local communities. Because of the harm that substances like marijuana and other illegal drugs pose to our society, I oppose their legalization. That said, I will keep your thoughts in mind as the 115th Congress progresses.

Thank you for contacting me about this important matter. If you would like to receive periodic updates about issues such as this, please sign up for my eNewsletter at http://mcconnell.senate.gov/ and become a fan of my page on Facebook, by visiting http://www.facebook.com/mitchmcconnell or follow my office on Twitter @McConnellPress.

Sincerely,

MITCH McCONNELL
UNITED STATES SENATOR