Sally Oh was Live on Facebook: “Medical Cannabis, States’ Rights & the Civil War”


Sally Oh

Above is the LINK to Sally Oh’s live video on Facebook explaining States Rights and the medical cannabis war.

There is also an article at this LINK from the Tenth Amendment Center which explains States Rights.

States Don’t Have to Comply: The Anti-Commandeering Doctrine

Laws passed in pursuance of the Constitution do stand as the supreme law of the land. But that doesn’t in any way imply the federal government lords over everything and everybody in America. LINK



There is also a very good layout of the Kentucky Cannabis Bills for 2018 at the KENTUCKY FREE PRESS website.  Here is that LINK.




For Immediate Release

February 23, 2018


After weeks of anticipation and months of discussions and meetings with stakeholders, the Kentucky Senate Majority Caucus filed its comprehensive pension reform bill as Senate Bill (SB) 1 on Tuesday, February 20.  While SB 1 marked the filing of one of the most significant pieces of legislation of the 2018 Session, we continued to hold committee meetings and voted bills out of the Senate chamber, making for another busy week in Frankfort.

In addressing our pension crisis, our goal was to balance the harsh reality of the fiscal health of the retirement systems with the expectations of current public employees, teachers, and retirees.  We worked to do just that while respecting the taxpayers of the Commonwealth, many of whom do not have a retirement plan of any kind.  I am proud to report that Senate Bill 1 is a data-driven plan that reflects hard work, numerous revisions, and most importantly, input from public employees.  We listened to your feedback and this plan reflects that.

This massive $40 billion pension problem occurred due to a combination of factors, such as failed promises by previous administrations to fund pensions at the level requested by the retirement systems, the Great Recession from 2008 to 2012, and pension board mismanagement of administrative costs, investments, and a failure to meet projected returns.  However, this new approach finally puts our state on the path to solvency.

This plan does not place any future state employees into a defined contribution, or a 401(k)-style, retirement plan, and it will not force any current or future state employees into a 401(k) plan.  It will not create a retirement “cliff” by preventing current employees or teachers from accruing more service credit in their defined benefit plan.

Most importantly, this proposal solves Kentucky’s $40 billion unfunded pension problem by changing how state government funds pensions.  Kentucky will convert to a “level dollar funding formula” which means the unfunded liability will be completely paid off within thirty years by making a large payment each year—just like paying off your home mortgage.  Under this funding plan, the retirement systems will receive hundreds of millions more in funding each year, going above and beyond the minimum payment to more quickly pay down the debt.  I look forward to continuing the pension discussion as the bill moves through the legislative process.

One of the first pieces of legislation we passed this week was Senate Resolution 149, which recognizes the role the hospitality industry can play in disrupting child sex trafficking and encouraging residents, employees, and agencies to use hotels and venues which are signatories of the Tourism Child-Protection Code of Conduct, known as The Code.  The Code is a voluntary multi-stakeholder initiative with the mission to provide awareness, tools, and support to the tourism industry to prevent the sexual exploitation of children.

We also passed a number of other bills in the Senate this week: Senate Bill 119 lays out the legal carcass disposal methods for cervid (deer) meat processors; Senate Bill 149 and SB 126 are both reorganization bills for the Cabinet for Health and Family Services; Senate Bill 109 updates the statutory definition of rape; and House Bill 74 aims to deter the resell of stolen goods to pawnbrokers by making the pawnbrokers’ registers more transparent and requiring secondhand merchandise sold to a pawnbroker to be held a minimum of 12 days before being resold.

The budget is still in the hands of the House of Representatives, but we expect to receive it in the Senate in the coming weeks.  We have already begun an intensive review process, and once it is in our possession, we will continue that process while making our own changes.  It is a lengthy and strenuous process, but I am confident that the final product will be fiscally responsible while ensuring sufficient funding for our critical programs.

If you have any questions or comments about these issues or any other public policy issue, please call me toll-free at 1-800-372-7181.  You can also review the Legislature’s work online at

# # #

Note:  Senator David Givens (R-Greensburg) represents the 9th District including Allen, Barren, Green, Metcalfe, Monroe and Simpson Counties.  He serves as a member of the Appropriations and Revenue Committee, the Agriculture Committee, the Education Committee, the Enrollment Committee, and the Health and Welfare Committee. For a high-resolution .jpeg of Senator Givens, please log onto

Important Bills to watch in Kentucky

Every so often I post emails containing the Bills being worked on in Kentucky, from the Legislature.  I thought I would post a list for the Medical Marijuana and adult use Cannabis Bills, and a few other Bills of interest as well.  There are several hundred this year and there is no way anyone could keep up with all of them.  I encourage you to go to the link and browse them for yourself.  It can be interesting and informative reading!

Home Page Banner

By clicking on the above LINK you will access the website of the Kentucky Legislature.

Then you can access Bill Watch and register to track the bills that interest YOU.

Bill Watch – This free service enables registered users unlimited tracking of legislation during the Kentucky Legislative Session.


Cannabis Bills include:

SB 80 (BR 906) Sponsors:  Dan Malano Seum  / An Act To Regulate Cannabis.

HB 166 (BR 184) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT relating to medical cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

SB 118 (BR 1392) Sponsor: Multiple / AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

HCR 34 (BR 447) Sponsors: Multiple / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION calling for the expediting of research regarding the safety and efficacy of the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

SB 23 (BR 163)  Sponsors:  Julian M Carroll; Reginald Thomas; Denise Harper Angel; / AN ACT relating to cannabidiol use.  Create a new section of KRS Chapter 218A to permit a physician to recommend the use of cannabidiol or cannabidiol products;

Hemp Bills include:

HCR 35 (BR 878) Sponsors:  DJ Johnson; Kimberly Poore Moser / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging Congress to amend the federal Controlled Substances Act to remove hemp from the definition of marijuana.

Other Issues:

HB 35 (BR  173)  Sponsors:  C. Wesley Morgan / AN ACT relating to public assistance.  Amend KRS 205.200 to create a substance abuse screening program for adult recipients of public assistance, food stamps, and state medical assistance.

HCR  106 (BR  1116)  Sponsors:  Multiple / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging Congress and the President of the United States to enact a long-term reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

HB 243 (BR 313) Sponsors:  Toby Herald; Adam Koenig / AN ACT relating to the consolidation of counties.

HB 242 (BR 331) Sponsors:  Toby Herald / AN ACT relating to school districts.

SB 2 (BR 308) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT proposing an amendment to Section 54 of the Constitution of Kentucky. / The General Assembly shall have power to Limit the amount to be recovered for injuries resulting in death. / allow the General Assembly the power to limit damages for injuries resulting in death or for injuries to persons or property, and to provide a uniform statute of limitations;

HB 124 (BR 139) Sponsors: Addia Wuchner;  Kimberly Poore Moser / AN ACT relating to enhanced standards and criteria for substance use disorder treatment and recovery services and programs and declaring an emergency.

HB 213 (BR 1202) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to data-sharing of prescription drug monitoring information.  Amend KRS 218A.245 to allow KASPER data-sharing agreements with different types of jurisdictions.

HB 148 (BR 440)  Sponsors: Addia Wuchner; Kimberly Poore Moser /AN ACT relating to prescription medications in hospice programs.   Create a new section of KRS Chapter 381 to shift ownership of controlled substances from a deceased hospice patient to a hospice program so the hospice program may dispose of the controlled substances.

HB 115 (BR 260)  Sponsors:  Robby Mills / AN ACT relating to reporting prescriptions to terminate a pregnancy.  Amend KRS 213.101 to require a physician to report a prescription for mifeprex, misoprostol, or any other drug or combination of drugs that are intended to end a pregnancy…

SB 5 (BR 216) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to pharmacy benefits in the Medicaid program.  Create a new section of KRS Chapter 205 to require the Department for Medicaid Services to directly administer all outpatient pharmacy benefits; prohibit renewal or negotiation of new contracts to provide Medicaid managed care that allow administration of outpatient benefits by any entity but the Department for Medicaid Services;

HB 85 (BR 126)  Sponsors:  Scott Wells; / AN ACT relating to elimination of the certificate of need.  Amend KRS 13B.020 to delete reference to certificate of need hearings; amend KRS 79.080 to replace the Kentucky Health Facilities and Health Services Certificate of Need and Licensure Board with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services;

HB 167 (BR 400) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to abandoned infants. Amend KRS 405.075 to establish a definition and allow the use of a “newborn safety device” related to the anonymous surrendering of a newborn infant in the Commonwealth.

HR 98 (BR 1061) Sponsors:  Multiple / A RESOLUTION urging the United States Congress to propose an amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America promoting equality of citizenship by establishing that artificial entities, such as corporations, associations, or other similar groups, are not persons and can be regulated, and that money is not speech and can be regulated.

SB 4 (BR 110) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT proposing to amend Section 95 of the Constitution of Kentucky relating to the election of state officers.  Propose to amend Section 95 of the Constitution of Kentucky to hold the election of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Auditor of Public Accounts, Attorney General, Secretary of State and Commissioner of Agriculture, Labor and Statistics in even-numbered years, every four years, beginning in 2024;

HB 195 (BR 1056) Sponsors: Multiple / Amend KRS 344.010 to include definitions for “sexual orientation” and “gender identity”; amend KRS 344.020, relating to the purpose of the Kentucky’s civil rights chapter, to include a prohibition against discrimination because of sexual orientation and gender identity.

HB 303 (BR 1059) Sponsors: Multiple / Amend KRS 337.010, relating to the definition of “employees” of retail stores and service industries, to increase the applicable threshold of business that applies to from $95,000 to $500,000; amend KRS 337.275 to raise the state minimum wage to not less than $8.80 an hour on August 1, 2018, not less than $10.35 an hour beginning on August 1, 2019, not less than $11.90 an hour beginning on August 1, 2020, not less than $13.45 an hour beginning on August 1, 2021, and not less than $15.00 per hour beginning on August 1, 2022;

SB 48 (BR 265) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT relating to child marriage. Amend KRS 402.020 to establish a new minimum age for marriage; amend KRS 402.030 to establish the power of courts to declare a marriage void when one party is under 18 years of age; amend KRS 402.210 to prohibit individuals under the age of 17 years from marrying; establish the process for a 17- year old to petition a court for permission to marry and the criteria for granting the petition; repeal KRS 402.260 which provides for the estate of minors who marry to be placed in receivership until they reach the age of 18 years.

(KY) This Week at the State Capitol (Jan. 29 – Feb. 2)

February 2, 2018

This Week at the State Capitol (Jan. 29 – Feb. 2)

Pace quickens in second month of legislative session

FRANKFORT – As lawmakers enter the second month of the Kentucky General Assembly’s 2018 session, action already has been taken on a number of fronts that could have impacts across the state.

Lawmakers have approved a measure to allow Kentuckians to vote in November on a proposed state constitutional amendment to create what’s been referred to as a “bill of rights” for crime victims.

Budget subcommittees are digging into the details of the governor’s proposed spending plan to fully understand the potential impact of proposed cuts, as well as certain areas where spending increases are proposed. In the coming weeks, lawmakers will begin weighing which parts of the budget plan they want to adjust to make sure the final plan is one that matches their priorities for the state.

Meanwhile, almost 300 bills have been introduced for consideration in the Senate and House. The amount of legislation moving through the process will continue growing each day up as more bills are filed and advanced through the legislative committee system.

Bills that took steps forward this week include:

· Senate Bill 37 would allow some nonviolent federal prisoners to get driver’s licenses so they can work outside of prison walls. SB 37 would also amend current law to included federal prisoners under existing regulations that allow state prisoners to receive driver’s licenses or identification cards upon release. SB 37 passed the Senate by a 36-0 vote. The measure now goes to the House for further consideration.

· House Bill 52 would require any child under age 12 to wear a helmet while riding a bicycle. While the bill does not impose fines for not wearing a helmet, the intent is to increase safety for children while cycling. After passing the House Transportation Committee, HB 52 now goes to the full House for consideration.

· Under House Bill 84, coroners or medical examiners would be required to verify the organ and tissue donation wishes of a deceased person in their care. Such information is now released by coroners and medical examiners to Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates upon the group’s request, but the intent of this bill is to increase urgency in this process. HB 84 passed the House by a vote of 88-0 and now goes to the Senate for consideration.

· Senate Bill 68 would clarify that a victim of domestic violence is not required to pay divorce costs of a spouse locked up for crimes against the petitioner. Under current state law, someone seeking a divorce against an incarcerated person can be held responsible for paying the incarcerated person’s court-appointed lawyer, even when the imprisonment is the result of spousal abuse. This bill was passed by the Senate this week by a 37-0 vote and has been delivered to the House.

· House Bill 132 would require Kentucky public high school students to fulfill a financial literacy requirement to graduate. The bill was approved this week by a vote of 68-24 in the state House and now goes to the Senate.

· ­Senate Bill 72 would curtail the naming of state buildings, roads and bridges after living politicians in Kentucky with the intent to take the politics out of these naming decisions. Passing with a 35-3 vote in the Senate, it now goes to the state House for further consideration.

Legislators are eager to receive feedback on the issues confronting our state. To share your thoughts and ideas with state lawmakers, please call the General Assembly’s toll-free message line at (800) 372-7181.


New House Bill Could Merge Kentucky Counties

Graphic courtesy Ralph Davis, EKB

LEXINGTON, Ky. (LEX 18) –  House Bill 243,  sponsored by Republican state Rep. Toby Herald, of Beattyville, would change Kentucky’s political landscape in the most literal way.

The bill would consolidate 100 counties into 34. Larger counties, such as Fayette, Jefferson, Warren and Pike, would remain unchanged.

The counties could be renamed and local governments would consolidate.

A similar bill, HB 242 would also reduce the number of Kentucky’s county and independent school districts. Boyd County would retain its own school district despite merging with Martin and Lawrence in HB 243.


Create noncodified sections to consolidate various counties in the Commonwealth; stipulate how the county is to be divided into districts, select new county names and county seats, form taxing districts, integrate into representative, senatorial, congressional districts, or judicial circuits, require that records are transferred, treat appointed officials on boards, and the transition of the board functions, account for special districts, transfer contracts, bonds, franchises and other legal instruments to new county, transfer employees employed as of December 31, 2022, to new county, maintain local option status until changed by law, require Circuit Court clerks serve remainder of term concurrently and have duties for that period prescribed by Administrative Office of the Courts, and transition county board of election membership to coordinate with the consolidation.  LINK


KY Cannabis Freedom Coalition Requests Your Help!



Call NOW 1-800-372-7181


AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis.
     Establish and create new sections of KRS Chapter 245 to define terms, allow for possession, growth, use, processing, purchasing, transfer, and consumption of cannabis;  LINK

KY’s Medical Marijuana Bill filed HB166


HB166 has been sent to the House Judiciary Committee chaired by Representative Joseph Fischer from Campbell County KY.

Representative Fischer is currently a NO VOTE. He believes KY’s cancer patients & chronically ill patients should continue going to jail for consuming or possessing cannabis.

As chairman of the committee he has the power and ability to bring HB166 up to a vote.

Call (800) 372-7181

Leave this message for the House Judiciary Committee:

“Bring HB166 up for discussion & vote”

Your call today could mean the difference in wether HB166, KY’s Medical Cannabis bill, passes or fails.

Call your KY legislators today
(800) 372-7181
“Bring HB166 up for discussion & vote”