(KY) Judge Weighs Whether Lawmakers Can Revive Dead Legislation

A Kentucky judge is questioning how the state legislature passed a pension overhaul bill that prompted thousands of teachers to protest.

June 7, 2018, at 4:13 p.m.

By ADAM BEAM, Associated Press

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP)Kentucky has lots of abandoned private sewer systems causing problems for homeowners. To fix this, a state lawmaker sponsored a bill to let local governments buy these systems, even if they are outside the government’s boundaries.

But when lawmakers gutted the 11-page sewer bill and replaced it with a 291-page overhaul of the state pension system, howls of protest echoed through the Capitol. Because the bill had technically already passed the Senate, lawmakers were able to send it to the governor’s desk in about six hours instead of the minimum five days the state Constitution requires to pass new legislation. The bill was not available for the public to read until the day after lawmakers passed it.

Lawmakers in Kentucky and state Capitols across the country routinely use this process to pass bills in the waning days of a legislative session, arguing it is sometimes the only way to pass complex and contentious legislation within the tight deadlines imposed by their state constitutions. But Thursday, a state judge questioned whether it was legal during a hearing on a lawsuit seeking to block the pension bill.

“We have a Lazarus problem here. How can you raise a bill from the dead without starting over?” Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd said.

Thursday’s hearing in the case to nullify the pension law was the first step in a legal process that will likely end at the state Supreme Court. The question of how lawmakers pass legislation could be the main issue. Shepherd indicated as much Thursday as he spent most of his time asking questions about the process and saying he had concerns about its effects on “open and transparent legislation.”

Lawmakers have been using this process for decades. In 2015, they turned a bill about prison health care into an anti-drug bill that increased penalties for heroin dealers and directed more money toward substance abuse treatment. In 2017, lawmakers turned a bill about dog bites into one that overhauled the University of Louisville’s broad of trustees as it was in a crisis over its accreditation.

David Fleenor, an attorney for Kentucky’s legislative leaders, noted lawmakers did not pull the pension bill out of thin air. The bill had previously been Senate bill 1, which had gone through the legislative process with public hearings but had gotten bogged down in the Senate. When lawmakers finally reached agreement to pass it, they did not have enough time left to do it the usual way.

“This is a citizen legislature that is there for a very finite period of time,” said David Fleenor, an attorney for Senate President Robert Stivers. “You need a mechanism to be able to do that.”

Stephen Pitt, an attorney for Republican Gov. Matt Bevin, warned if the court ruled this process was illegal it would open the door for countless other bills to be challenged. But Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear dismissed that as a “scare tactic.” He noted the same argument was used a few years ago in a lawsuit challenging the legislative practice of stopping the clock on the last day of the session to give lawmakers more time to pass bills. The court ruled that was illegal, and it did not result in a cascade of nullified laws.

Beshear argued the practice of gutting and replacing bills shuts out the public because the legislature moves so fast it does not give them a chance to participate.

“You call it a Lazarus situation, this is like a Walking Dead bill,” Beshear said. “You have to kill it twice.”

Teachers and other state workers packed the courtroom for Thursday’s hearing, some wearing red t-shirts that read “a pension is a promise.” Erin Grace, a 37-year-old teacher at Rockcastle County High School, said one way or another, the bill will be overturned.

“If it’s not overturned in court, we’re going to elect people that are going to reverse it as quickly as it was enacted,” she said.

CONTINUE READING…

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(KY) SENATOR DAVID GIVENS’ LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

For Immediate Release

April 6, 2018

SENATOR DAVID GIVENS’ LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

After a productive 58th day of the 2018 Legislative Session that saw the passing of several significant bills to benefit the Commonwealth, we have now entered a 10-day “veto recess” where Governor Matt Bevin will have the opportunity to sign and veto bills passed by the Kentucky General Assembly. The most significant measures to pass on Monday, April 2, were a budget and a revenue bill that will dictate how our state collects and appropriates funding for the next two years.

Some of the budget highlights included historical funding levels for state education, including record-high SEEK per-pupil funding, in addition to funding SEEK transportation at historic levels. All the charter school funding language was also removed from the budget. We fully funded the Department of Veterans Affairs and the State Police and shored up our state’s pension systems, including the Teachers’ Retirement System, by fully funding them. This bill also ensures that retired teachers will see no health care premium increases or coverage decreases. Lastly, there are raises for our social workers who are on the front lines of taking care of our state’s most vulnerable.

Kentucky’s ailing pension systems have commanded significant funding increases in recent years and in order to honor our commitment to our retirement systems, we needed to come up with some added revenue to protect other vital government entities from funding reductions. Our approach decreased Kentucky’s tax income rate while broadening the tax base, a shift to a more consumption-based tax system which relies more on spending habits. This allows Kentuckians to keep more of their hard-earned income.

People have expressed concern to me that HB 366, the state’s revenue bill that also includes tax reform, raises the income tax on Kentucky’s most vulnerable. This is simply not the case. This proposal creates a flat income tax of five percent. If you make less than 133 percent of the poverty level (roughly around $18,000 or less) you are exempt from paying income taxes. If you make between $18,000-$75,000, your tax income tax rate will be lowered from 5.8 percent to five percent, keeping more money in the pockets of hard-working Kentuckians.

These are just a few of the biennium budget highlights, but ultimately our focus remained on fully funding education, providing for our public protectors, and ensuring our pension systems are fully funded. In our budget bill, we dedicated approximately $3.3 billion in funding, nearly 14 percent of the total budget, to help fund these ailing pension systems. We made a promise to our state employees, and these two bills help us keep that promise.

In addition to passing the Commonwealth’s budget and revenue bills, we passed a number of other measures this week. House Bill 1 is a comprehensive overhaul of Kentucky’s foster care and adoption system. More than 8,600 Kentucky children are now in foster care and awaiting permanent homes, and the need for such reform has been obvious for a long time. House Bill 1 includes major provisions that would expand the definition of blood relative for child placement.

The legislation would also require more case reviews for each child in foster care, create a “putative father registry” so that a child’s possible (but not verified) biological father can be notified of the child’s prospective adoption, and allow the state to seek termination of parental rights for new mothers who will not seek drug treatment after giving birth to a drug-addicted baby.

Senate changes to HB 1 that made it into the final bill include provisions that would protect a mother from losing her parental rights if she was properly prescribed and using medication that could have caused her newborn’s addiction. The amended bill would also clarify that foster parents and child placement agencies be given a 10-day notice before a foster child is reunited with his or her birth parents or placed in a new home.

Senate Bill 5 was also given final passage this week. This bill levels the playing field for small-town, locally-owned pharmacies. Senate Bill 5, as amended by the House, would make the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services in charge of setting the reimbursement rates for a pharmacist. The rate is currently set by pharmacy-benefit managers (PBMs) hired by the state’s Medicaid managed-care organizations (MCOs). Kentucky Medicaid spends $1.7 billion annually on prescriptions and SB 5 would help authorities track that money and determine whether locally-owned pharmacies were being reimbursed fairly.

We also passed House Bill 362, which allows for the phase-in of increased pension costs for local governments. Recently, the Kentucky Retirement Systems Board adjusted their assumptions to require cities, counties, and other quasi-governmental entities to increase their pension contributions. If those increased pension contribution costs were not phased in over time, several of these local governments would be at risk of bankruptcy.

Passage of major pension reform legislation in recent weeks allowed us to justify the decision to allow counties and cities to phase-in these costly pension contributions, which was the language passed in House Bill 362. While this measure represented a win for local governments and quasi-governmental entities, it reiterated the need for raising revenue through tax reform, as we did in House Bill 366.

There are only two days left in the 2018 Regular Session. We will reconvene for those final two days on Friday, April 13, and Saturday, April 14. Kentucky’s constitution requires the General Assembly to be adjourned by April 15, and since April 15 is a Sunday and we cannot constitutionally meet that day, we must finish the state’s business by midnight on April 14. It has been an honor to represent you and our district in Frankfort, and I thank you for engaging in the legislative process.

If you have any questions or comments about these issues or any other public policy issue, please call me toll-free at 1-800-372-7181.  You can also review the Legislature’s work online at www.lrc.ky.gov.

# # #

Note:  Senator David Givens (R-Greensburg) represents the 9th District including Allen, Barren, Green, Metcalfe, Monroe and Simpson Counties.  He serves as a member of the Appropriations and Revenue Committee, the Agriculture Committee, the Education Committee, the Enrollment Committee, and the Health and Welfare Committee. For a high-resolution .jpeg of Senator Givens, please log onto http://www.lrc.ky.gov/pubinfo/portraits/senate09.jpg.

Those who overdose on heroin or other opioid drugs in Kentucky’s largest population areas would be immediately detained by first responders and taken to a hospital under a bill that has passed the House.

For Immediate Release

March 20, 2018

Opioid overdose bill goes to Senate

FRANKFORT—Those who overdose on heroin or other opioid drugs in Kentucky’s largest population areas would be immediately detained by first responders and taken to a hospital under a bill that has passed the House.

House Bill 428, sponsored by Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, would specifically apply to overdose victims in Lexington, Louisville, or areas like Northern Kentucky where adjoining counties each have populations over 90,000.

Moser, who is the director of the Northern Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy, said the need for the bill was brought to her attention by first responders who she said are often called to resuscitate the same person for opioid overdose multiple times. Moser said there were over 15,100 emergency medical runs requiring resuscitation due to opioid overdoses in Kentucky last year, not counting more than 2,000 runs in Jefferson County alone.

First responders “brought this issue to me because they are unable to get the folks into treatment when they are resuscitated,” said Moser. “These folks wake up and they are able to just get up and walk away and refuse treatment” even though she said they may still be under the influence of drugs.

“They need to get to a hospital for stabilization, referral to treatment and further treatment and this is what this bill seeks to do,” said Moser.

Failure to receive appropriate treatment for opioid overdose often leads to death, with 1,404 deaths from opioid overdose reported in Kentucky in 2016 alone, said Moser.

“Death is a distinct possibility with opioid overdoses,” she said.

HB 428 passed the House on a 92-3 vote. It now goes to the Senate for its consideration.

–END–

Additionally,

For Immediate Release

March 21, 2018

Standards-for-treatment disorders bill goes to governor

FRANKFORT— A bill that would attack Kentucky’s opioid crisis through better state substance use disorder treatment and recovery program standards has received final passage in the Kentucky House.

House Bill 124, sponsored by House Health and Family Services Committee Chair Rep. Addia Wuchner, R-Florence, and Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, would require enhanced licensure and quality standards for substance use disorder treatment and recovery after a state review of current statewide standards, subject to available funding. Enhanced standards would cover residential, outpatient and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) services, according to the bill.

Wuchner said she has traveled the state visiting treatment and recovery centers and found that some programs have “a lot of dynamics and a lot of differences.”

“That doesn’t mean that every program has to be the same, but there should be components of that program that are consistent with best practices,” said Wuchner.

HB 124 was amended in the Senate on a 36-0 vote late last week to include FDA-approved MAT treatment for inmates who are opioid-dependent or who have other substance abuse disorders.

“As some of those products that are used for medically-assisted treatment come to market and come to bear, there are more products now that could be used in the corrections environment that minimize diversion, and that’s why this piece was added,” said Wuchner.

HB 124 received final passage in the House today on a vote of 93-0. The bill was initially passed in the House on an 85-2 vote in January. 

–END–

(KY) According to the Office of Drug Control Policy, in 2016, approximately 561,000 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $745,000 worth of assets were seized…

Dear Ms. Krider;

Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana. Your views help me represent Kentucky and the nation in the United States Senate, and I appreciate the opportunity to respond to your concerns.

In your correspondence, you expressed your thoughts on rescheduling marijuana from its current status as a Schedule I controlled substance. Kentuckians continue to combat the negative consequences associated with the cultivation and distribution of marijuana in communities across the state. According to the Office of Drug Control Policy, in 2016, approximately 561,000 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $745,000 worth of assets were seized, and more than 85 weapons were taken off the streets as a result of the marijuana eradication operations. Kentucky carries the dubious distinction of ranking as one of the top marijuana producing states in the nation. Traffickers have been known to trespass on both private and public lands, often resulting in damage to private property and many of the Commonwealth’s most cherished natural habitats.

That is one reason why I encouraged Gil Kerlikowske, then-Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, to tour Kentucky. Known as the country’s “drug czar,” Director Kerlikowske focused his attention on better understanding the scope of Kentucky’s drug problem in order to make an informed decision on how best to continue the federal government’s commitment to combating drugs in the Commonwealth within current resource limitations.

There is no doubt that drug abuse persists as a serious problem in all 120 counties of the Commonwealth, and the effects of such abuse have proved devastating for our local communities. Because of the harm that substances like marijuana and other illegal drugs pose to our society, I oppose their legalization. That said, I will keep your thoughts in mind as the 115th Congress progresses.

Thank you for contacting me about this important matter. If you would like to receive periodic updates about issues such as this, please sign up for my eNewsletter at http://mcconnell.senate.gov/ and become a fan of my page on Facebook, by visiting http://www.facebook.com/mitchmcconnell or follow my office on Twitter @McConnellPress.

Sincerely,

MITCH McCONNELL
UNITED STATES SENATOR

Sally Oh was Live on Facebook: “Medical Cannabis, States’ Rights & the Civil War”

PLEASE TAKE 10 MINUTES TO LISTEN TO SALLY OH’S VIDEO!

Sally Oh

Above is the LINK to Sally Oh’s live video on Facebook explaining States Rights and the medical cannabis war.

There is also an article at this LINK from the Tenth Amendment Center which explains States Rights.

States Don’t Have to Comply: The Anti-Commandeering Doctrine

Laws passed in pursuance of the Constitution do stand as the supreme law of the land. But that doesn’t in any way imply the federal government lords over everything and everybody in America. LINK

REPEAL  CANNABIS PROHIBITION IN  KENTUCKY NOW!  SAVE OUR STATE!

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There is also a very good layout of the Kentucky Cannabis Bills for 2018 at the KENTUCKY FREE PRESS website.  Here is that LINK.


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http://tenthamendmentcenter.com/2013/12/28/states-dont-have-to-comply-the-anti-comandeering-doctrine/

https://www.facebook.com/dreambiggerxo/videos/1600760853378573/

http://www.kyfreepress.com/2018/02/medical-cannabis-ky-2018/

(KY) SENATOR DAVID GIVENS’ LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

https://i2.wp.com/www.lrc.ky.gov/pubinfo/portraits/senate09.jpg

For Immediate Release

February 23, 2018

SENATOR DAVID GIVENS’ LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

After weeks of anticipation and months of discussions and meetings with stakeholders, the Kentucky Senate Majority Caucus filed its comprehensive pension reform bill as Senate Bill (SB) 1 on Tuesday, February 20.  While SB 1 marked the filing of one of the most significant pieces of legislation of the 2018 Session, we continued to hold committee meetings and voted bills out of the Senate chamber, making for another busy week in Frankfort.

In addressing our pension crisis, our goal was to balance the harsh reality of the fiscal health of the retirement systems with the expectations of current public employees, teachers, and retirees.  We worked to do just that while respecting the taxpayers of the Commonwealth, many of whom do not have a retirement plan of any kind.  I am proud to report that Senate Bill 1 is a data-driven plan that reflects hard work, numerous revisions, and most importantly, input from public employees.  We listened to your feedback and this plan reflects that.

This massive $40 billion pension problem occurred due to a combination of factors, such as failed promises by previous administrations to fund pensions at the level requested by the retirement systems, the Great Recession from 2008 to 2012, and pension board mismanagement of administrative costs, investments, and a failure to meet projected returns.  However, this new approach finally puts our state on the path to solvency.

This plan does not place any future state employees into a defined contribution, or a 401(k)-style, retirement plan, and it will not force any current or future state employees into a 401(k) plan.  It will not create a retirement “cliff” by preventing current employees or teachers from accruing more service credit in their defined benefit plan.

Most importantly, this proposal solves Kentucky’s $40 billion unfunded pension problem by changing how state government funds pensions.  Kentucky will convert to a “level dollar funding formula” which means the unfunded liability will be completely paid off within thirty years by making a large payment each year—just like paying off your home mortgage.  Under this funding plan, the retirement systems will receive hundreds of millions more in funding each year, going above and beyond the minimum payment to more quickly pay down the debt.  I look forward to continuing the pension discussion as the bill moves through the legislative process.

One of the first pieces of legislation we passed this week was Senate Resolution 149, which recognizes the role the hospitality industry can play in disrupting child sex trafficking and encouraging residents, employees, and agencies to use hotels and venues which are signatories of the Tourism Child-Protection Code of Conduct, known as The Code.  The Code is a voluntary multi-stakeholder initiative with the mission to provide awareness, tools, and support to the tourism industry to prevent the sexual exploitation of children.

We also passed a number of other bills in the Senate this week: Senate Bill 119 lays out the legal carcass disposal methods for cervid (deer) meat processors; Senate Bill 149 and SB 126 are both reorganization bills for the Cabinet for Health and Family Services; Senate Bill 109 updates the statutory definition of rape; and House Bill 74 aims to deter the resell of stolen goods to pawnbrokers by making the pawnbrokers’ registers more transparent and requiring secondhand merchandise sold to a pawnbroker to be held a minimum of 12 days before being resold.

The budget is still in the hands of the House of Representatives, but we expect to receive it in the Senate in the coming weeks.  We have already begun an intensive review process, and once it is in our possession, we will continue that process while making our own changes.  It is a lengthy and strenuous process, but I am confident that the final product will be fiscally responsible while ensuring sufficient funding for our critical programs.

If you have any questions or comments about these issues or any other public policy issue, please call me toll-free at 1-800-372-7181.  You can also review the Legislature’s work online at www.lrc.ky.gov.

# # #

Note:  Senator David Givens (R-Greensburg) represents the 9th District including Allen, Barren, Green, Metcalfe, Monroe and Simpson Counties.  He serves as a member of the Appropriations and Revenue Committee, the Agriculture Committee, the Education Committee, the Enrollment Committee, and the Health and Welfare Committee. For a high-resolution .jpeg of Senator Givens, please log onto http://www.lrc.ky.gov/pubinfo/portraits/senate09.jpg.

Important Bills to watch in Kentucky

Every so often I post emails containing the Bills being worked on in Kentucky, from the Legislature.  I thought I would post a list for the Medical Marijuana and adult use Cannabis Bills, and a few other Bills of interest as well.  There are several hundred this year and there is no way anyone could keep up with all of them.  I encourage you to go to the link and browse them for yourself.  It can be interesting and informative reading!

Home Page Banner

By clicking on the above LINK you will access the website of the Kentucky Legislature.

Then you can access Bill Watch and register to track the bills that interest YOU.

Bill Watch – This free service enables Kentucky.gov registered users unlimited tracking of legislation during the Kentucky Legislative Session.

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Cannabis Bills include:

SB 80 (BR 906) Sponsors:  Dan Malano Seum  / An Act To Regulate Cannabis.

HB 166 (BR 184) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT relating to medical cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

SB 118 (BR 1392) Sponsor: Multiple / AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

HCR 34 (BR 447) Sponsors: Multiple / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION calling for the expediting of research regarding the safety and efficacy of the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

SB 23 (BR 163)  Sponsors:  Julian M Carroll; Reginald Thomas; Denise Harper Angel; / AN ACT relating to cannabidiol use.  Create a new section of KRS Chapter 218A to permit a physician to recommend the use of cannabidiol or cannabidiol products;

Hemp Bills include:

HCR 35 (BR 878) Sponsors:  DJ Johnson; Kimberly Poore Moser / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging Congress to amend the federal Controlled Substances Act to remove hemp from the definition of marijuana.

Other Issues:

HB 35 (BR  173)  Sponsors:  C. Wesley Morgan / AN ACT relating to public assistance.  Amend KRS 205.200 to create a substance abuse screening program for adult recipients of public assistance, food stamps, and state medical assistance.

HCR  106 (BR  1116)  Sponsors:  Multiple / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging Congress and the President of the United States to enact a long-term reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

HB 243 (BR 313) Sponsors:  Toby Herald; Adam Koenig / AN ACT relating to the consolidation of counties.

HB 242 (BR 331) Sponsors:  Toby Herald / AN ACT relating to school districts.

SB 2 (BR 308) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT proposing an amendment to Section 54 of the Constitution of Kentucky. / The General Assembly shall have power to Limit the amount to be recovered for injuries resulting in death. / allow the General Assembly the power to limit damages for injuries resulting in death or for injuries to persons or property, and to provide a uniform statute of limitations;

HB 124 (BR 139) Sponsors: Addia Wuchner;  Kimberly Poore Moser / AN ACT relating to enhanced standards and criteria for substance use disorder treatment and recovery services and programs and declaring an emergency.

HB 213 (BR 1202) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to data-sharing of prescription drug monitoring information.  Amend KRS 218A.245 to allow KASPER data-sharing agreements with different types of jurisdictions.

HB 148 (BR 440)  Sponsors: Addia Wuchner; Kimberly Poore Moser /AN ACT relating to prescription medications in hospice programs.   Create a new section of KRS Chapter 381 to shift ownership of controlled substances from a deceased hospice patient to a hospice program so the hospice program may dispose of the controlled substances.

HB 115 (BR 260)  Sponsors:  Robby Mills / AN ACT relating to reporting prescriptions to terminate a pregnancy.  Amend KRS 213.101 to require a physician to report a prescription for mifeprex, misoprostol, or any other drug or combination of drugs that are intended to end a pregnancy…

SB 5 (BR 216) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to pharmacy benefits in the Medicaid program.  Create a new section of KRS Chapter 205 to require the Department for Medicaid Services to directly administer all outpatient pharmacy benefits; prohibit renewal or negotiation of new contracts to provide Medicaid managed care that allow administration of outpatient benefits by any entity but the Department for Medicaid Services;

HB 85 (BR 126)  Sponsors:  Scott Wells; / AN ACT relating to elimination of the certificate of need.  Amend KRS 13B.020 to delete reference to certificate of need hearings; amend KRS 79.080 to replace the Kentucky Health Facilities and Health Services Certificate of Need and Licensure Board with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services;

HB 167 (BR 400) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to abandoned infants. Amend KRS 405.075 to establish a definition and allow the use of a “newborn safety device” related to the anonymous surrendering of a newborn infant in the Commonwealth.

HR 98 (BR 1061) Sponsors:  Multiple / A RESOLUTION urging the United States Congress to propose an amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America promoting equality of citizenship by establishing that artificial entities, such as corporations, associations, or other similar groups, are not persons and can be regulated, and that money is not speech and can be regulated.

SB 4 (BR 110) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT proposing to amend Section 95 of the Constitution of Kentucky relating to the election of state officers.  Propose to amend Section 95 of the Constitution of Kentucky to hold the election of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Auditor of Public Accounts, Attorney General, Secretary of State and Commissioner of Agriculture, Labor and Statistics in even-numbered years, every four years, beginning in 2024;

HB 195 (BR 1056) Sponsors: Multiple / Amend KRS 344.010 to include definitions for “sexual orientation” and “gender identity”; amend KRS 344.020, relating to the purpose of the Kentucky’s civil rights chapter, to include a prohibition against discrimination because of sexual orientation and gender identity.

HB 303 (BR 1059) Sponsors: Multiple / Amend KRS 337.010, relating to the definition of “employees” of retail stores and service industries, to increase the applicable threshold of business that applies to from $95,000 to $500,000; amend KRS 337.275 to raise the state minimum wage to not less than $8.80 an hour on August 1, 2018, not less than $10.35 an hour beginning on August 1, 2019, not less than $11.90 an hour beginning on August 1, 2020, not less than $13.45 an hour beginning on August 1, 2021, and not less than $15.00 per hour beginning on August 1, 2022;

SB 48 (BR 265) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT relating to child marriage. Amend KRS 402.020 to establish a new minimum age for marriage; amend KRS 402.030 to establish the power of courts to declare a marriage void when one party is under 18 years of age; amend KRS 402.210 to prohibit individuals under the age of 17 years from marrying; establish the process for a 17- year old to petition a court for permission to marry and the criteria for granting the petition; repeal KRS 402.260 which provides for the estate of minors who marry to be placed in receivership until they reach the age of 18 years.