On Tuesday, November 5th, WE Must Be The Change In Kentucky! Vote HICKS/CORMICAN! This Is Why…

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On Tuesday, November 5th, the most important election in Kentucky in many years is about to happen!

I am not here to argue with anyone.  I am here to present the facts and my opinion as I see it.

Therefore,

First of all, you must vote to see change!  If you are eligible to Vote and are registered to do so – You must VOTE!  It is your Civic Duty.  And if you are eligible to vote but did not register, shame on you!

IF you want a change in your Government, you have to vote for the people who will CHANGE the way things are being done in           Kentucky!

You CANNOT vote for a Democrat or Republican and expect anything to change – only to get worse!  So if that is what you want, then go for it!

Otherwise, BE THE CHANGE that Kentucky must have in order to succeed!  John Hicks and Ann Cormican – Libertarian are running for the most important office in the State.  That is where we must start!  At the top!

On November 1st, Rep. Jason Nemes prefiled this years “medical marijuana bill” for Kentucky.  It will become House Bill 136 when the Session opens in January, and if it passes we will once again become Slaves to the system!  A few points on the Bill as written are:

*  Department for Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control to implement and regulate the medicinal marijuana program in Kentucky;

*  establish the Division of Medicinal Marijuana within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control;

establish restrictions on the possession of medicinal marijuana by qualifying patients, visiting patients, and designated caregivers;

*  establish certain protections for cardholders;

*  establish professional protections for practitioners; to provide for the authorizing of practitioners by state licensing boards to issue written certifications for the use medicinal marijuana;

*  establish professional protections for attorneys;

* prohibit the possession and use of medicinal marijuana while operating a motor vehicle;

to prohibit smoking of medicinal marijuana;

* to permit an employer to restrict the possession and use of medicinal marijuana by an employee;

*  to require the department to implement and operate a registry identification card program; to establish requirements for registry identification cards; to establish registry identification card fees; to require the department to operate a provisional licensure receipt system; to establish the application requirements for a registry identification card; to establish when the department may deny an application for a registry identification card;

*  establish certain responsibilities for cardholders; to establish when a registry identification card may be revoked;

*  establish various cannabis business licensure categories; to establish tiering of cannabis business licenses; to require certain information be included in an application for a cannabis business license; to establish when the department may deny an application for a cannabis business license;

*  to establish rules for local sales, including establishing the process by which a local legislative body may prohibit the operation of cannabis businesses within its territory and the process for local ordinances and ballot initiatives;

*  establish technical requirements for cannabis businesses;

to establish limits on the THC content of medicinal marijuana that can be produced or sold in the state;

*  to establish requirements for cannabis cultivators, including cultivation square footage limits; to establish requirements for cannabis dispensaries; to establish requirements for safety compliance facilities; to establish requirements for cannabis processors; to establish procedures for the department to inspect cannabis businesses;

to exempt certain records and information from the disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act;

*  to establish that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the cost of use; to establish the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to establish the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; and to establish procedures for the distribution of local cannabis trust fund moneys;

*  create a new section of KRS Chapter 138 to establish an excise tax of 12% for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries; to require that 80% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to require that 20% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; amend KRS 342.815 to establish that the Employer’s Mutual Insurance Authority shall not be required to provide coverage to an employer if doing so would subject the authority to a violation of state or federal law;

Is this what you want?

The above is not all inclusive of the regulations, and they will no doubt change again when it is introduced in January.  Read the Bill!

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Please note that there are NO provisions for “smokable cannabis”, and NO mention of Children’s rights either.  There are NO provisions for growing your own plants, and this BILL in my opinion is being promoted for the Corporate/Pharmaceutical industry. 

Out of all the Bills previously submitted for “medical” or “adult use” Cannabis in Kentucky this is the worst one yet!  Do not fall for the legal lies which they are feeding you because they are preying on your fears for your Children’s needs, mostly.  The fact is, what M.D., is going to give you permission or a written statement that will give you the right to medicate your child with Cannabis?  The answer to that is virtually none, and if there was even one that WOULD do it there is no guarantee that you will be able to access that Physician!

The bill would prohibit the smoking of marijuana for medical purposes, but would allow other forms of consumption, such as edibles, oils and pills.  A 12% excise tax is proposed for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries.  LINK

I have consulted with several other Senior Activists in Kentucky over this issue and we all surmised basically the same opinions on the matter!  This is in NO way a repeal of prohibition of Cannabis and in no way will it ascertain our rights to this plant – medically or otherwise.  It is however, worth some $$$ to Corporate Ventures and Kentucky Government as it now stands!

In my opinion, for those parents who have seriously ill children in need of this medicine they need to consider moving to a honest medical cannabis State such as Colorado or elsewhere.  For those who are unable to do this due to financial situations we must set up a fund to enable them to do so.  I can honestly say that if it were my child that is exactly what I would do!  Not because I want to leave my home in Kentucky, but because my Childs life is more important and I would be compelled to do so, IF John Hicks and Ann Cormican are not elected. 

The “Undergreen Railroad” is one such organization.  I will look into this organization further, especially if Hicks/Cormican are not elected, because you all are going to need it!

Finally, we come to the third candidate in the governor’s race. Libertarian John Hicks. John is a Vietnam Era Army veteran, a former school teacher, and currently an IT consultant. He has a BA Degree in Political Science and History. He has never held political office, but ran previously for State Representative (District 43) in 2018. John is pro-life and believes government should stay out of personal issues.
John supports the legalization of marijuana, expanded gaming, and the development of hemp as sources of additional state revenue (better than raising taxes!). He also believes that the best way to compensate for budget shortfalls is to reduce the size of government and streamlining operations. Additionally, John Hicks supports election reform; specifically by introducing run-offs, using ranked choice voting, proportional representation, multi member districts which would end partisan gerrymandering.
   LINK

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Manages Kentucky Open Source Society

John Hicks IS qualified for the position of Governor, as he IS ONE OF US!  He will bring us liberty and fight for OUR rights as Kentucky Citizens!

We need to show the entire Country what Kentucky can do when faced with such a dire situation – It’s not just about Cannabis – It is about Liberty and  Justice for All!

Please make the right choice for our State, our Families, our Children, and our Country!

Do not condemn Our State once again!

God Bless You All

smkrider

11/3/2019

https://www.facebook.com/HicksForKentucky/

https://www.facebook.com/hicksforkygov/

https://www.facebook.com/jason.nemes.1/posts/3321913687848659

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=3321910424515652&set=a.170767459629980&type=3&theater

https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators/Pages/Legislator-Profile.aspx?DistrictNumber=33

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/prefiled/BR366.html?fbclid=IwAR1A_cH3LEwMDixbcMN1o5u5XrRB-gFQZM4qmAaZXrIZa9aYUjEjmeA4vgE

https://www.facebook.com/johnrhicks?__tn__=%2Cd-]-h-R&eid=ARANzRCvypZKWWjzlKWQixSeBkF7a97sNZINNMIU-dY8JZZgHxFfuPbr1urQ6ro5Ui9nfNGocWfFP88Z

http://www.anotheropinionblog.com/2019/11/the-2019-kentucky-election-main-event.html?fbclid=IwAR2vzCm-4QDieeyVDP2XKDUtgvSHkcivekuOVKzOCd2JiYaFJEGca1AFr7o

https://www.wlky.com/article/kentucky-lawmaker-prefiles-bill-to-legalize-medical-marijuana/29669383?fbclid=IwAR2a8kMPicpnBgioaeKcHaEoYxiuBNGC3bzvwhGsb10DS7DoVeHIMu3wBD0#

http://www.ladybud.com/2014/01/14/the-undergreen-railroad-helping-patients-relocate-for-cannabis-access/

Randy Moore interviews candidate for KY Gov. John Hicks

Web Exclusive: Randy Moore interviews candidate for KY Gov. John Hicks

By Randy Moore | August 28, 2019 at 4:18 PM CDT – Updated August 28 at 4:18 PM

OWENSBORO, Ky. (WFIE) – We now have 14 News web exclusive interviews with all three candidates in the race for Kentucky Governor.

You know about Republican Governor Matt Bevin and Democrat Attorney General Andy Beshear, but you might not know much about Libertarian candidate John Hicks.

Hicks lives on the west side of Louisville. He is an I.T. specialist with experience as a public school teacher and community newspaper publisher and editor.

Hicks met with Randy Moore at the 14 News Owensboro studio.

He says with polarization going on with the Republican and Democrat parties, now is the the perfect time for the emergence of the Libertarian Party.

“The two party system just basically pits people against each other. It divides you up into two groups and makes you hate on each other. And that’s a way to keep people distracted so the powers that be that control these parties get their work done. I think people are beginning to see that and that’s why they are coming to the Libertarian Party,” said Hicks.

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VIEW VIDEO AT THIS LINK

FACEBOOK PAGE THIS LINK

KENTUCKY LIBERTARIAN PARTY THIS LINK

PLEASE JOIN US NOW AND BE THE CHANGE FOR KENTUCKY!  WE NEED SOMEONE WHO CARES ABOUT US, NOT THEIR BANK ACCOUNTS AND SPECIAL INTERESTS!  THIS MAY BE THE LAST CHANCE WE HAVE TO GET THIS RIGHT!  DON’T LET ANOTHER DEMOCRAT OR REPUBLICAN SET US UP FOR FAILURE AGAIN!  DON’T BELIEVE THE LIES!

Will Kentucky’s Libertarians take advantage of the opportunities they have won in court and at the ballot box?

lpky

Will Kentucky’s Libertarians take advantage of the opportunities they have won in court and at the ballot box?

Will they support their candidates by buying yard signs, promoting candidates on social media, attending events, or knocking on doors?

2019 presents the Libertarian Party of Kentucky (LPKY) with extraordinary opportunities to promote liberty and increase the Party’s reputation and membership. Federal Judge William Bertelsman effectively overturned bi-partisan Kentucky House Bill 114, which was intended among other things to eliminate all Libertarian’s from the ballot this year. The Judge called the actions of the Kentucky General Assembly and Governor Bevin, who signed the bill, “arbitrary and capricious”.

For the first time in Kentucky’s history all voters will see the name of a Libertarian candidate for Governor on every ballot. That kind of broad scale exposure is precious for a political party. John Hicks, Libertarian candidate for Governor, and his running mate, Ann Cormican for Lieutenant Governor, will expose Kentuckians to the fact that they are no longer limited to the bi-polar choices of the two big parties. The very same parties who unsuccessfully tried to silence Libertarians by manipulating the legislative process (HB 114).

Other Libertarian candidates who will appear on the statewide ballot November 5, 2019 include: Kyle Hugenberg, Auditor of Public Accounts, and Joshua Gilpin, Commissioner of Agriculture. Hugenberg is the only candidate for the position who is a degreed accountant and a member of the Institute of Internal Auditors. Gilpin is an experienced farmer and advocate for the cultivation of hemp.

Kyle Sweeney will appear on the ballot in Boone County. He is running to fill the position of Boone County Clerk that was vacated by the untimely death of Kenny Brown.

To support these candidates please make donations by visiting:

https://www.hickscormicanforkentucky.com/

https://lpky.org/

This is the time for Libertarians to show they are serious about participating in the political process.

The Libertarian Party of Kentucky is the third largest party in the state. It supports candidates who promote greater personal liberty for all, free markets, lower taxes, and less government spending.

Read more @ https://lpky.org/2019/08/07/opportunity-knocks/

SOURCE LINK

Libertarian candidate enters Kentucky governor’s race

Libertarian Party of Kentucky

Billy Kobin, Louisville Courier Journal Published 2:12 p.m. ET May 14, 2019 | Updated 2:48 p.m. ET May 14, 2019

After a federal judge temporarily blocked a new section of a state law related to filing deadlines, a Libertarian Party candidate has officially joined the 2019 race to become Kentucky’s next governor.

John Hicks officially became a candidate Monday, according to the Kentucky Secretary of State’s office.

Hicks is a Louisville native and information technology consultant who made a bid to represent the 43rd District in the Kentucky House of Representatives in November. He lost the race to Democrat Charles Booker.

Hicks, 72, is also a U.S. Army veteran who served in Vietnam, and he previously taught in Jefferson County Public Schools and published a community newspaper in Fern Creek.

The Libertarian candidate’s running mate is Ann Cormican, a native of Paris, Kentucky, who works at the Toyota Kentucky manufacturing facility in Georgetown. 

Cormican also made an unsuccessful bid last November to represent the 72nd District in the Kentucky House of Representatives.

The pair almost failed to make it on the statewide ballot in Kentucky’s gubernatorial race.

State legislators approved a measure, House Bill 114, in March that retroactively moved up the filing deadline for third-party and independent candidates from April 1 to January 11.

More: Kentucky lawmakers vote to limit the secretary of state’s power

Hicks said he had filed his candidacy before April 1 but after the January deadline.

The Libertarian Party of Kentucky took the matter to federal court, arguing the measure denied its candidates access to the statewide ballot in 2019.

On May 9, a U.S. District Court judge in Covington agreed and temporarily blocked the section of the state law related to filing deadlines.

Fixing a “broken electoral system” and not “controlling the private life” of Kentuckians are among the Libertarian ticket’s priorities, Hicks told the Courier Journal.

An instant runoff system for elections is one electoral reform that Hicks said could benefit Kentucky.

“I think we’re going to be the moderate party,” Hicks said. “We’re certainly in a position where we can work with members of both major parties in the Legislature.”

Ann Cormican

Ann Cormican (Photo: Provided by John Hicks)

Hicks and Cormican already won the Libertarian Party’s state primary back in March, meaning they will appear on ballots in November. (The Libertarian Party is not included in the May 21 primary involving Republican and Democratic candidates.)

Hicks said he is agrees with many of Gov. Matt Bevin’s policies but is “skeptical” of the incumbent’s policies of “subsidizing private industry” and trying to intervene in “moral matters.”

And Bevin’s criticism of those he disagrees with also concerns Hicks.

“A lot of Gov. Bevin’s policies have been right on,” Hicks said. “But his rhetoric has been terrible.”

Reach Billy Kobin at bkobin@courierjournal.com or 502-582-7030. Support strong local journalism by subscribing today: courier-journal.com/subscribe.

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Senate advances bill to change election dates

For Immediate Release

Jan. 11, 2018

Senate advances bill to change election dates

FRANKFORT – Legislation that would move the election of Kentucky’s governor and other statewide officers to even-numbered years passed the state Senate today by a 24-11 vote.

Senate Bill 4 sponsor Sen. Christian McDaniel, R-Taylor Mill, said the legislation would save about $15.5 million in taxpayer money, triple voter turnout in downballot races and simplify the election system by aligning Kentucky’s election cycle with presidential elections.

McDaniel said it is at least the fifth session a bill to change Kentucky’s election cycle has been filed in the last decade.

“While it might have a little bit of a different number every time we see it, the principles remain the same,” he said in reference to the different bill numbers the legislation has been assigned over the years.

Sen. Reginald Thomas, D-Lexington, spoke against the bill. He said SB 4 would blur the line between state and federal issues.

“I don’t think we should confuse who is running for president … with who is going to be our governor,” Thomas said. “This bill goes the wrong direction.”

Sen. Tom Buford, R-Nicholasville, stood to explain his vote in favor of the SB 4.

“There was a gentleman named Charles de Gaulle who said, ‘Politics is too serious of a matter to be left to politicians.’ Let’s let the people decide what they want for a change.”

Since SB 4 is a constitutional amendment, the legislation will require a supermajority in the state House before it could be placed on the ballot in November to be decided upon by the people.

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KCFC supports Samuel Gaskins in the 1st congressional district

(Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Coalition)

KCFC supports Samuel Gaskins in the 1st congressional district. He is a cannabis supporter and a friend of our board. Here’s his opponent, James Comers, stance on cannabis In Kentucky.
VOTE SAMUEL GASKINS!

Comer on MJ

CONTINUE READING and to GROUP

These 5 wealthy, out-of-state men helped finance the GOP takeover of Kentucky’s House

Arthur Laffer, the former Reagan Administration economist who advised Gov. Sam Brownback on his tax plan, testifies before the Kansas House Tax committee at the statehouse, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012 in Topeka, Kan.

Above:  Arthur Laffer, the former Reagan Administration economist who advised Gov. Sam Brownback on his tax plan, testifies before the Kansas House Tax committee at the statehouse, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012 in Topeka, Kan. Thad Allton AP

By Daniel Desrochers

ddesrochers@herald-leader.com

Last fall, a group of five wealthy men from out-of-state dumped at least $211,500 into Republican efforts to take over the Kentucky House of Representatives for the first time since 1921.

They live from Miami to New York, but have one common bond: Arthur Laffer, a prominent conservative economist who served in the Reagan administration.

They also share a similar goal: reshaping how Kentuckians pay taxes.

“I think now’s a good time for any state like Kentucky to look at their tax structure and say ‘how can we modernize?’” said Travis H. Brown, a Missouri lobbyist who donated $23,000 to GOP House members, more than any other individual.

They picked a winning horse, pumping $105,000 of their money directly to winning candidates and another $59,500 to state GOP committees that gave more than $1.8 million to successful GOP House candidates.

Follow the money: Search donations to the Kentucky House of Representatives

Republicans claimed a super majority in the House and quickly pledged support for Gov. Matt Bevin’s promise to call a special law-making session later this year to transition Kentucky’s tax system from one based on production (income taxes) to one based on consumption (sales taxes).

That economic philosophy was, in many ways, coined by Laffer. His message of lowering income taxes and reducing business taxes has been embraced by scores of Republican politicians across the country.

Though Laffer and his associates may feel the time is right for business-friendly tax reform in Kentucky, there’s a roadblock — massively underfunded pension systems for state workers and teachers.

Last November, financial projections showed Kentucky’s state pension systems had an unfunded liability of $32.5 billion, with the main pension system for state employees only 16 percent funded (anything below 80 percent is considered underfunded). Now, Bevin claims that number is grossly miscalculated, suggesting the state’s real pension debt is closer to $82 billion.

To meet that challenge, Bevin warned in his State of the Commonwealth Address last month that any changes to Kentucky’s tax code will have to raise revenue, not reduce it.

“This is not going to be a revenue neutral tax plan,” Bevin said in the speech. “It’s not. We can’t afford for it to be, that’s a straight up fact. We cannot pay off eight times what we bring in if we simply reshuffle the deck.”

Brown, though, says Kentucky can still raise revenue without raising taxes, arguing that the state can even cut taxes if it’s on the right side of the “Laffer Curve,” an economic concept that says a higher tax rate doesn’t necessarily mean more government revenue.

“What percent of your state government is not efficient as it should be?” Brown asked. “What voters typically believe is they know how to spend their money better than the government knows how to spend their money.”

Regardless of how lawmakers in Frankfort decide to rewrite the tax code, Laffer and his associates clearly thought Kentucky was ripe for an influx of conservative philosophy.

“It just looked like the time and place where it was to come,” Brown said.

Here’s a closer look at the five men, of which only Brown responded to Herald-Leader requests for interviews.

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