Investigation in Glasgow, KY, finds officers not responsible for death of Jeremy Marr…

“Please don’t kill me!”

04/16/21 7:44PM CST

Released earlier today was the statement and body cam footage (that had NOT previously been seen).  And with that they concluded  the Officers involved in the arrest and death of Jeremy Marr are not responsible.

Yes, he was intoxicated, he may have legitimately been paranoid considering how things turned out.  The Officers in my opinion misused their authority after tazing him over 10-11 times plus physical force…and then claim it was a medical incident!  Well, yeah, that much is correct, it was a medical incident alright, before and during the encounter.  Afterwards it was a death investigation that never should have had to happen. 

I must say that I am heartbroken over this case as it is in my County.  I fear this will be a huge scar on our County for a long time.  I’ve never known of a police involved death in this manner here before since I’ve been here – about 11 years.

My heart goes out to the family involved and I pray they can get some kind of justice out of this God forsaken mess.

GLASGOW, Ky. (WBKO) – One year after the incident, Kentucky State Police have released the body camera footage from the arrest of Jeremy Marr, 35, who died while in police custody on April 14, 2020.  

According to KSP records, Marr’s cause of death was listed as Agitated / Excited delirium complicating acute methamphetamine intoxication during the arrest by Dr. Darius Arabadjief. The examiner found ‘no lethal trauma.’ The toxicology report showed Marr had methamphetamine and amphetamine in his system.

Commonwealth Attorney Jesse Stockton sent a letter to Kentucky State Police which stated he did not see any credible evidence that the officers involved in the arrest of Marr were not responsible for his death.

Meanwhile, Marr’s widow, Joanna Marr, filed a lawsuit on behalf of Marr’s estate against the city of Glasgow, the Glasgow Police Department and three police officers. The lawsuit alleges that Marr was forcibly subdued by Glasgow Police Officers Guy Turcotte, Hayden Phillips and Sergeant Cameron Murrell, adding that the physical force used during the arrest resulted in Marr’s death.

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Above:  BODYCAM FOOTAGE

Below:  FOOTAGE TAPED BY CELLPHONE BY PASSERBY

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Below are links to information on the case since it began.

Lawsuit filed over death of Kentucky man in police custody

New details alleged in Jeremy Marr death as attorney speaks out

Kentucky State Police deny open records request regarding Jeremy Marr investigation

Protesters rally outside Glasgow Police Department after suspect dies in custody

SUDDEATH: Expediency needed in death investigation | Opinion | glasgowdailytimes.com

#BlackLivesMatter #glasgow #Kentucky #CAVECITY #barrencounty #alllivesmatterwhenblacklivesmatter

This man died at the hands of Glasgow Police in April…. As of yet no indication of why…. However in the video which was filmed by people passing the scene – the immediate cause is apparent – police abuse. #ALLLIVESMATTER #ENDTHEMADNESS #ENDPOLICEABUSE !!

I must add the following statement – It has been my experience with the Barren County Sheriff’s that they have been very good to me. They helped when I needed it and was respectful in all matters.

THERE IS NO MAN BETTER THAN A GOOD OFFICER! BUT THERE IS NO ONE WORSE THAN A BAD OFFICER!

And as far as looting and causing disruptions – you are going after and hurting the very people that you are supposed to be helping….Your neighbors and neighborhood businesses! They did not cause the problem we see today with police abuse! They are in the middle of it all just like you! Go after and protest to the people who are in charge of the abuse! The people in charge of our Government must understand that we cannot be treated like “sub-humans”……

I don’t care what color you are!

SUDDEATH: Expediency needed in death investigation

Obituary for Jeremy Scott Marr | Goad Funeral Home (goadfh.com)

I will continue to follow this story and bring updates….

sk

Time to Step Up & Unite to Save America!

Reba LIVE!

Above you will find some of my key interviews, as well as my radio show, episodes which deal with the Assembly and other key issues important in this process of self-governance. They will help inform you as you move forward into a brighter tomorrow.

Time to Step Up & Unite to Save America!

10 KEY Steps To An Assembly

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Real American History

You can register at the above link to become a member or for access information.  There is also a call-in radio show which you would have access to.  According to Reba, Alaska and Michigan have already resettled in this manner. 

I haven’t personally had time to review all the material.  I urge you to access all the links and information and decide what you think.  Comments are welcome.

National Assembly Conference Call

Thursday night at 9 p.m. Eastern

Conference call: 712-770-4160# Access Code: 226823#

Backup number: 716-293-9720

Reba@RedStateTalkRadio.com

Questions can be directed to RebaLIVE17@gmail.com.

Kentucky General Assembly’s 2021 session ends

In the year of our Lord 2021, Kentucky still doubts the Cannabis Plant!

#thisiskentucky #NOCannabis

For Immediate Release

March 30, 2021

Kentucky General Assembly’s 2021 session ends

FRANKFORT — The Kentucky General Assembly’s 2021 regular session was gaveled to a close this evening, ending a session in which lawmakers approved a state budget for the coming fiscal year and approved numerous other bills that will affect people throughout the state.

Most new laws approved this year will go into effect 90 days from today’s adjournment, except for those that specify a different effective date or include an emergency clause that makes them take effect the instant they become law.

Legislation approved by the 2021 General Assembly includes measures on the following topics:

Abortion. House Bill 91 will allow Kentucky voters to decide next year whether to add the following words to the state constitution: “To protect human life, nothing in this Constitution shall be construed to secure or protect a right to abortion or require the funding of abortion.”

Adoption. House Bill 210 will ensure that employers offer parents adopting a child under the age of 10 the same leave policies that they provide to birth parents.

Asthma. Senate Bill 127 encourages schools to keep bronchodilator rescue inhalers in at least two locations and will require schools with inhalers to have policies and procedures in place regarding their use.

Attorney General. House Bill 2 will give the attorney general greater authority to enforce laws concerning abortion clinics in Kentucky.

Born-alive infants. Senate Bill 9 requires that medically appropriate and reasonable life-saving and life-sustaining medical care and treatment must not be denied to any born-alive infant, including cases in which an attempted abortion results in a live birth.

Billboards. House Bill 328 will re-establish the state’s regulatory authority for roadside billboards after a federal court ruling called the state’s prior regulations into question. It will put Kentucky’s statute back in place with changes intended to ensure its constitutionality.

Capitol security. Senate Bill 227 will require Kentucky State Police to brief the leadership of the General Assembly and the Legislative Research Commission on security matters relating to the State Capitol campus.

Child and new mother fatalities. House Bill 212 will require data in an annual state report on fatalities among children and new mothers to include information on demographics, race, income and geography associated with the fatalities.

Child protection. House Bill 254 will raise the penalty for possession or viewing of matter portraying a sexual performance by a minor under the age of 12 years to a Class C felony. It will also raise the penalty for the distribution of matter portraying a sexual performance of a minor under the age of 12 years to a Class C felony for the first offense and a Class B felony for each subsequent offense.

Civil actions. House Bill 3 will allow civil actions regarding the constitutionality of a Kentucky statute, executive order, administrative regulation or order of any cabinet be filed outside of Franklin County.

Colon cancer. Senate Bill 16 will change the name of Kentucky’s Colon Cancer Screening Program to the Colon Cancer Screening and Prevention Program. A second provision will raise money for the screening program from the sale of special cancer prevention license plates. It will also require the Department for Medicaid Services to release statistics on cancer services related to colorectal cancer.

Commission on Race and Access to Opportunity. Senate Bill 10 will create the Commission on Race and Access to Opportunity. The group will conduct studies and research on issues where disparities may exist in areas including education, child welfare, health care, the economy and the criminal justice system.

Diabetes. House Bill 95 will help those with diabetes by capping cost-sharing requirements for prescription insulin at $30 per 30-day supply in state-regulated health plans.

Driver safety. House Bill 439 will require a vision test renew a driver’s license, starting in 2024.

Education. House Bill 563 will give families more options when making decisions about schools. The bill will allow the use of education opportunity accounts, a type of scholarship, for educational expenses and, for students in some of the state’s largest counties, for private school tuition. Individuals or businesses who donate to organizations that issue education opportunity accounts will be eligible for a tax credit. The measure will also require a board of education to adopt a nonresident pupil policy to govern terms under which the district allows enrollment of nonresident pupils.

Elections. House Bill 574 will make some of the election procedures implemented last year to accommodate voting during the pandemic permanent. The measure will offer Kentuckians three days – including a Saturday – leading up to an election day for early, in-person voting. It will allow county clerks to continue to offer ballot drop boxes for those who do not wish to send their ballots back by mail. It will also allow counties to offer voting centers where any registered voter in the county could vote.

Ethics. Senate Bill 6 will create standards for the ethical conduct of transition team members of all newly elected statewide officeholders. The standards include identifying any team member who is or has been a lobbyist. It will require disclosure of current employment, board member appointments and any non-state sources of money received for their services. It will also prohibit the receipt of nonpublic information that could benefit a transition team member financially.

Firefighters. House Bill 44 will allocate funding to help full-time and volunteer firefighters experiencing post-traumatic stress injuries or disorders receive proper care from licensed mental health professionals.

First responders. Senate Bill 169 will give first responders injured in the line of duty access to more disability benefits. Line of duty or duty-related disability benefits payable to a member of any of the systems administered by the Kentucky Retirement Systems will increase from 25% to 75% of the member’s monthly average pay.

Fish and Wildlife Commission. House Bill 394 will ensure that the state’s Fish and Wildlife Resources Commission will have sole authority to appoint the commissioner of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

Gaming. Senate Bill 120 will define pari-mutuel wagering in state law in a manner intended to ensure the legality of certain historical horse racing games that are often compared to slot machines.

General Assembly. House Bill 4 will let voters decide next year on a proposed amendment to the Kentucky Constitution that would allow the General Assembly to convene an additional 12 legislative days each year upon a joint proclamation from the Senate President and House Speaker.

Groceries. House Bill 190 will exempt legally permitted food service establishments from any state or local laws and administrative regulations that prohibit the sale of grocery items such as bread, milk, and other staples.

Illegal dumping. Senate Bill 86 will designate 100 percent of a new open dumping fine to be paid to the county where the violation occurred.

Immunizations. Senate Bill 8 would create exemptions from any mandatory immunizations for those who object based on religious beliefs. It also prohibits orders during an epidemic from requiring the immunization of people who object based on conscientiously held beliefs or the written opinion of the person’s physician that immunization would be injurious to the person’s health.

Inmate care. Senate Bill 84 will ban jails, penitentiaries, local and state correctional facilities, residential centers and reentry centers from placing inmates who are pregnant or within the immediate postpartum period in restrictive housing, administrative segregation, or solitary confinement. It will grant an inmate who gives birth 72 hours with a newborn before returning to the correctional facility and will offer six weeks of postpartum care. It also mandates that incarcerated pregnant women have access to social workers and any community-based programs to facilitate the placement and possible reunification of their child.

In-person instruction. House Bill 208 called on public schools to reopen to in-person instruction in some capacity by March 29. The legislation set the expectation that public schools would be open to in-person instruction at least four days a week for the remainder of the 2020-21 academic year. Schools have the option to operate under a hybrid model where students spend part of the week attending in-person classes and the rest from home. The bill requires schools to allow a student to attend in-person classes at least twice a week under the hybrid model. It also limits the remaining amount of nontraditional instruction days school districts are allowed to use.

Kentucky-grown products. Senate Bill 102 will include Asian Carp, paddlefish, or swordfish in the definition of “Kentucky-grown agricultural product.”

Kindergarten. House Bill 382 will make $140 million available for full-day kindergarten in Kentucky schools. The legislation also appropriates money allocated to the state from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) to projects including: $575 million to pay back the interest and principal on the federal unemployment insurance trust fund loan Kentucky took out during the pandemic; $842,400 for Kentucky’s nature preserves; $50,000 for the Kentucky African American Heritage Commission; and $3.3 million to reopen the Northern Kentucky Regional Medical Examiner’s Office. The bill also allocated an additional $50 million for broadband expansion through ARPA funds.

Late fees. House Bill 272 will allow water districts to impose a 10 percent late fee and cut off service for nonpayment of bills. Customers who receive financial assistance for their bills will be exempt.

Livestock. House Bill 229 will make someone guilty of criminal mischief for intentionally or wantonly causing damage to livestock.

Living organ donors. House Bill 75 will prohibit certain insurance coverage determinations based upon the status of an individual as a living organ donor. It will also encourage the Cabinet for Health and Family Services to develop educational materials relating to living organ donation.

Medicaid. Senate Bill 55 will prohibit copays for Medicaid beneficiaries.

Microbreweries. Senate Bill 15 will allow microbreweries to sell and deliver up to 2,500 barrels to any retailer under certain restrictions. It will also require arbitration for some disputes with distributors.

Newborn safety. House Bill 155 will allow the use of a “newborn safety device” when a newborn is being anonymously surrendered by a parent at a participating staffed police station, fire station, or hospital. The device allows a parent surrendering an infant to do so safely using a receptacle that triggers an alarm once a newborn is placed inside so that medical care providers can immediately respond and provide care to the child.

No-knock warrants. Senate Bill 4 will limit and set guidelines for the use of no-knock warrants, which allow officers to enter a premises without notice. Under the legislation, such warrants will be allowed in limited instances if someone was in immediate danger or in other cases, such as those involving violent crimes or terrorism. The measure also specifies it would be perjury if an officer made a false statement in an application for a no-knock warrant.

Operational guidelines. House Bill 1 created a framework for businesses, local governments, schools and nonprofits to operate during COVID-19 restrictions. It suspends interest on unpaid unemployment insurance contributions until next year. It also provides guidelines for noncustodial parental visitation during the state of emergency and will allow each resident at long-term care facilities designate an “essential personal care visitor” that will be exempt from visitor restrictions. (This is one of several new laws being challenged in court by the governor.)

Organ and tissue donation. Senate Bill 12 prohibits a person from selling or purchasing human organs or tissues and prohibits for-profit entities from procuring any eye, cornea, eye tissue, or corneal tissue. The measure is intended to preserve the nonprofit nature of human eye tissue donations.

Oversight and investigations. House Bill 6 will change the name of the Legislative Program Review and Investigations Committee to the Oversight and Investigations Committee. The goal is to make it the main investigative committee in the General Assembly. It will also, for the first time, define the committee’s subpoena powers.

Police standards. Senate Bill 80 will strengthen the police decertification process by expanding the number of acts considered professional wrongdoing. Such acts include unjustified use of excessive or deadly force and engaging in a sexual relationship with a victim. The bill also will require an officer to intervene when another officer is engaging in the use of unlawful and unjustified excessive or deadly force. It will also set up a system for an officer’s automatic decertification under certain circumstances and will prevent an officer from avoiding decertification by resigning before an internal investigation is complete.

Public records. House Bill 312 will limit the ability of people who do not live, work or conduct business in Kentucky to obtain records through the state’s open records law. These restrictions do not apply to out-of-state journalists. The legislation specifies that open records requests can be made via email. It also calls for a standardized form to be developed for open records requests, though it’s not required to be used. It will allow the legislative branch to make final and unappealable decisions regarding open records requests it receives. The bill will allow government agencies up to five days to respond to open records requests.

Recovery Ready Communities. House Bill 7 will establish the Advisory Council for Recovery Ready Communities. The council will be responsible for establishing a “Kentucky Recovery Ready Community Certification Program” to provide a measure of a city’s or county’s substance use disorder recovery programs and to assure citizens and businesses that a city or county is committed to ensuring the availability of high-quality recovery programs in its community.

Sexual abuse. Senate Bill 52 will amend third-degree rape, third-degree sodomy and second-degree sexual abuse statutes so law enforcement officers could be charged with those crimes if they engage in sexual acts with a person under investigation, in custody or under arrest.

Sexual assault. House Bill 472 will extend the statute of limitations for misdemeanor sexual assault offenses against minors from five years to 10. It also extends that window to 10 years on civil claims for the same course of conduct.

State budget. House Bill 192 contains the state spending plan for the upcoming fiscal year, which begins July 1. The plan will mostly continue spending in the manner of the current fiscal year’s budget, with some modifications. It includes some structural changes to the budget, such as putting more money in the rainy day fund and ensuring that funds meant for the state Road Fund aren’t diverted to other matters.

Supplementary education. Senate Bill 128 will allow students to retake or supplement courses that were interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic during the current school year.

Teacher retirement. House Bill 258 will create a new hybrid tier for the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System that contains elements of both defined benefit and defined contribution plans. This change will affect new hires starting in 2022, not current teachers. The bill changes when those teachers could retire. Instead of retiring in 27 years, new hires under this tier will have to work 30 years and be at least 57 to be eligible for retirement.

Telehealth. House Bill 140 will permit telehealth services that were allowed to expand due to COVID-19 pandemic to remain in place even after the pandemic ends.

Theft. House Bill 126 will increase the threshold of felony theft from $500 to $1,000. It will also allow law enforcement to charge members of organized shoplifting rings with a felony if a member steals a total of $1,000 worth of merchandise over 90 days.

Tobacco settlement funds. Senate Bill 3 will move the organization that decides how to spend much of Kentucky’s share of the Tobacco Master Agreement settlement money from the governor’s office to the Department of Agriculture.

To-go alcohol.  Senate Bill 67 will allow certain restaurants to sell alcohol, including cocktails, with to-go and delivery orders when purchased with a meal. The Kentucky Alcoholic Beverage Control Board is directed to promulgate regulations for the implementation of the bill.

Unemployment insurance overpayment. Senate Bill 7 will allow the state to waive unemployment insurance overpayment debts that occurred between Jan. 27 and Dec. 31 of last year if the overpayment is not the fault of the recipient and if requiring repayment would be “contrary to equity and good conscience,” according to the legislation.

U.S. Senators. Senate Bill 228 will change the way vacancies are filled for a U.S. senator from Kentucky. The bill will require the governor to choose a replacement from a list of three nominees selected by the state party of the departing senator.

Victim privacy. House Bill 273 will exclude from the open records act photographs or videos that depict a person’s death, killing, rape, sexual assault or abuse. The act is named in honor of Bailey Nicole Holt and Preston Ryan Cope, who were killed in the 2018 Marshall County High School shooting at the age of 15.

Worker safety regulations. House Bill 475 will prohibit the Kentucky Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board or the secretary from adopting or enforcing any occupational safety and health administrative regulation that is more stringent than the corresponding federal provision.

Youth camps. Senate Bill 66 will establish employment and background check standards for staff members working or volunteering at youth camps.

–END–

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Week 8 of the 2021 Regular Session

SENATOR JASON HOWELL’S LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

Week 8 of the 2021 Regular Session

With the end of the 2021 Regular Session in sight, fellow lawmakers and I are wrapping up legislative efforts by passing a variety of bills and finalizing the state’s annual budget.

As bills move through the process, vetoes are always a possibility. With that, the General Assembly needs to pass most bills by Tuesday, March 16, to consider any veto overrides that may be necessary.

Why so soon? The legislature will recess on Tuesday, March 16 and will reconvene on Monday, March 29. During the recess period, the Governor will have time to consider bills that have arrived on his desk. Upon returning to the Capitol at the end of the month, the legislature will only have 2 days remaining to pass additional legislation and override any vetoes. Therefore, any legislation sent to the Governor during those final days will not be eligible for a veto override, as we are constitutionally required to conclude Regular Session business before April 1 in odd numbered years.

In other news, the House and Senate have overridden the Governor’s vetoes on Senate Bill (SB) 3 and House Bill (HB) 6. Since both of these measures contain what’s known as an emergency clause, the bills go into effect immediately upon becoming law rather than 90 days after adjournment.

Senate Bill 3 moves the Office of Agricultural Policy under the jurisdiction of the Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner’s Office. Moving these critical boards under the authority of the Commissioner of Agriculture streamlines our efforts to strengthen Kentucky Agriculture and help our farmers. The office’s official role is the promotion of interests of agriculture and horticulture, agricultural revenues, and the protection of Kentucky’s livestock industries.

House Bill 6 strengthens an already existing legislative committee which, with the passing of this bill, would become the Legislative Oversight and Investigations Committee. It codifies subpoena powers, gives the committee the ability to maintain the confidentiality of investigative documents, and imposes fines on those in non-compliance with the committee’s efforts.

Several bills are now with the Governor for consideration including:

Senate Bill 102 expands the Kentucky Proud agricultural marketing program to allow products produced from Asian carp, paddlefish, or sturgeon to be qualified to use the Kentucky Proud logo on packaging as long as the fish were harvested from a body of water in Kentucky.

House Bill 312 limits the ability of people who do not live, work or conduct business in Kentucky to obtain records through the state’s open records law. These restrictions would not apply, however, to out-of-state journalists. A second section of HB 312 would explicitly allow open record requests to be made via email. A third would provide a standardized form for the requests but not require that it be used. Under this bill, the time to comply with requests would also be lengthened to five days from three.

House Bill 518 would change the makeup of the Kentucky State Fair Board and clarify how it operates. Not only does the fair board operate the Kentucky Exposition Center where the state fair is held, but it also operates the Kentucky International Convention Center in downtown Louisville. The two properties have an annual $500 million economic impact and generate $40 million in taxes.

The General Assembly took significant steps regarding the one-year State Budget this past week. Biennial budgets, or two-year budgets, are traditionally enacted in even-numbered years, the 60-day regular sessions of the General Assembly. As the budget was being crafted last year amid the pandemic’s onset, legislators did not know what the economic outlook, and therefore, what state revenues would be. Out of an abundance of caution, it was determined to pass only a one-year budget, then return to the 30-day session this year to pass another. This year’s budget will essentially be a continuing budget and will look similar to last year’s budget.

The budget conference committee met to publicly review and discuss decisions regarding the budget proposals from the Governor, the House, and the Senate. This committee consists of Majority and Minority Leadership and Appropriation and Revenue Committee Chairmen from both chambers. You can find the archived video of budget conference committee meetings by visiting www.ket.org/legislature/archives.

These final days of the session will be busy, so I encourage you to utilize the many legislative resources available to the public. Stay up to date on committee meetings and bill activity by visiting the LRC’s website at www.legislature.ky.gov. Additionally, you can stream live legislative coverage by logging onto www.ket.org/legislature.

If you have any questions or comments about these issues or any other public policy issue, please call me toll-free at 1-800-372-7181 or email me Jason.Howell@LRC.ky.gov.

# # #

Note: Senator Jason Howell (R- Murray) represents the 1st District including Calloway, Fulton, Graves, Hickman, Lyon, and Trigg Counties. Senator Howell serves as Vice-Chairman of the Senate Standing Committee on licensing & Occupations. He is also a member of the Senate Standing Committees on Agriculture; Banking and Insurance; and Health and Welfare. Additionally, Senator Howell serves as a member of the Capital Projects and Bond Oversight Statutory Committee. For a high-resolution .jpeg of Senator Howell, please visit: https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators%20Full%20Res%20Images/senate101.jpg.

"Breonna Taylor." "Say her name."

“Breonna Taylor.”

“Say her name.”

“No justice, no peace.”

Peaceful protesters met with riot gear, flashbangs, roadblocks, and arrests.

This was the refrain of the summer of 2020, which will forever be marked as the summer of protest, the summer of demands for justice. It was the summer the eyes of the world fell upon Kentucky, the home of an innocent Black woman who was murdered for no reason.

Today marks the one-year anniversary of Breonna Taylor’s death. It wasn’t only the tragedy of a young and promising life stolen that moved Kentuckians to action from Hazard to Paducah; it was also the insult of injustice.

Fueled by collective grief, Black Kentuckians led the call for justice, and thousands of Kentuckians from all backgrounds and corners of the commonwealth followed their lead. They allied to demand police accountability and to declare once and for all that Black Lives Matter.

The ACLU of Kentucky immediately expanded its racial justice work to ensure a death like Breonna’s never happens again. ACLU of Kentucky Policy Strategist Keturah Herron knew our organization’s role was to take the people’s demands and turn them into policy. Her goal was to first ban no-knock warrants in Louisville, and then take the measure statewide when the General Assembly convened seven months later. Working with allies, Keturah crafted Breonna’s Law and launched the #NoMoreNoKnocks campaign. Just 17 days later, the measure unanimously passed Louisville Metro Council and was formally named “Breonna’s Law.”

Internally, we renewed our commitment to racial justice by reexamining our work in all areas to approach policy through the lens of racial justice. When we lift up the people most harmed by society, we lift up all people. We also began the ongoing and difficult process of self-reflection to root out white supremacy in our own organization and hold ourselves to the same standards we expect from others.

Our work has carried into the General Assembly for the 2021 legislative session. Keturah has successfully collaborated with lawmakers from around the commonwealth and from both parties to create legislation that will save lives.

Breonna was an EMT and wanted to save lives. We will continue this work to honor her legacy and fight for a commonwealth that treats all Kentuckians equally under the law.

Sincerely,

Michael Aldridge

Michael Aldridge
Pronouns: He, him, his
Executive Director, ACLU of Kentucky

P.S. Watch a powerful video about Keturah’s work organizing Kentuckians on Breonna’s Law.

CONTINUE READING…

2021 Kentucky Cannabis

Legislation prior to this year can be found at the following link:

2020 Complete List of Cannabis/Hemp Bills Kentucky – U.S. Marijuana Party Kentucky (wordpress.com)

As of February 12, 2021 the following has been introduced into Kentucky Legislature:

Roberts Files Bill to Legalize Recreational Cannabis


FRI, 02/12/2021 – 07:12 RCN NEWSDESK

State Representative Rachel Roberts filed legislation this week that would legalize the use of recreational cannabis (marijuana) by adults, and to lead to the expungement of the criminal records of those convicted of marijuana-related misdemeanors.

The legislation, the Newport Democrat said, would also open the door for the use of marijuana by people suffering from chronic medical conditions.

“Fifteen states, including neighboring Illinois, have legalized cannabis and are reaping its considerable benefits,” said Roberts. “Kentucky has been desperate for new revenue for years to deal with rising costs in education, public employee pensions and healthcare. It is time to take advantage of the revenue from this growing market and stop the illegal trafficking of marijuana.

“By doing this, we could see as much as $100 million annually in new tax revenue, money that could make a real and lasting difference. Many Kentuckians would also be helped by having their criminal record expunged, while farmers would have a new crop rivaling what tobacco was for many decades.”  CONTINUE READING…

House Bill 467  Sponsor R. Roberts

Establish KRS Chapter 245 and create a section to define terms such as “cannabis accessory,” “cannabis product,” “immature cannabis plant,” “indoor cultivator,” “mature cannabis plant,” and “outdoor cultivator”; create new sections of KRS Chapter 245 to require cannabis to be tracked from seed to consumer; establish license types, application fees, and license fees, and direct license fees to the cannabis development fund; define sizes for cultivator license types; specify allowed transactions for each license type; set parameters for the home grower permit; require the board to promulgate an administrative regulation for license applications; set license length at one year and allow the board to establish renewal system; limit cannabis retail locations to one for every two thousand three hundred persons per county; require cannabis retail stores to be separate from other store and only carry cannabis, cannabis products, and cannabis accessories; create requirements for child-proof packaging and labeling; establish procedures for license denial and a hearing in accordance with KRS Chapter 13B; establish payments in lieu of suspension for licensees and direct the funds to the cannabis development fund and the agency’s revolving trust and agency account; establish minimum age of twenty-one to use or buy cannabis and create status offense for minors under eighteen; ban smoking cannabis in public; require signs in retail locations regarding minors and the US Surgeon General’s statement on cannabis, and create cannabis development fund, cannabis development board, and establish cannabis development fund oversight committee; create new sections of KRS Chapter 138 to define “cannabis,” “cannabis administrator,” and “cannabis product”; set wholesale tax rates and payment schedules for cannabis cultivator and processor licensees; allow local governments to impose up to a 5% regulatory license fee on cannabis licensees in their territory; establish conditions for tax liability; impose civil penalties for tax violations; amend KRS 139.200 to set retail tax rate for cannabis at 15% and amend KRS 139.260, 139.310, and 139.470 to conform; amend KRS 139.240 and 139.250 to require a permit for retailer from Department of Revenue; amend KRS 2.015 to exempt cannabis from age of majority; amend KRS 42.205 to include licensing and permit fees, payments in lieu of suspension, and moneys from wholesale taxes to go to the permanent pension fund and to be distributed quarterly to KERS nonhazardous and TRS funds; amend KRS 241.020 to include a Division of Cannabis in the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control; amend KRS 241.030 to add administrator of the Division of Cannabis; amend KRS 241.060 to add supervision of the cultivation, processing, testing, and trafficking of cannabis to the board’s duties; amend KRS 241.090 to add cannabis to search provisions; amend KRS 243.025 to direct application fees for cannabis licenses into the agency revolving trust account; amend KRS 218A.1421 to exempt cannabis licenses from trafficking statute; amend KRS 218A.1422 to exempt one ounce of marijuana from possession statute; amend KRS 218A.1423 to permit cannabis cultivator licensees and home grower permits to cultivate under their license or permit; amend KRS 218A.500 to exclude cannabis accessories from drug paraphernalia; create a new section of KRS Chapter 431 to create process for expungement of marijuana misdemeanor charges and to waive fees; amend KRS 431.079 to exclude need for certification of eligibility for expungement; amend KRS 131.1815 to include cannabis licensees in delinquent taxpayer statute; amend KRS 600.020 to include cannabis offenses in the definition of status offense; amend KRS 12.020 to create Division of Cannabis within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. CONTINUE READING…

House Bill 461 Sponsors N. Kulkarni, A. Scott, L. Willner

Establish KRS Chapter 245 and create new sections thereof to define terms, including “cannabis accessory”, “cannabis product”, “immature cannabis plant”, and “mature cannabis plant”; require cannabis to be tracked from seed to consumer; establish license types, application fees, and license fees; specify allowed transactions for each license type; require the board to promulgate an administrative regulation for license applications; set license length at one year and allow the board to establish renewal system; set forth an applicant scoring system; establish parameters for social equity applicant and disproportionately impacted areas; require cannabis retail stores to be separate from other store and only carry cannabis, cannabis products, and cannabis accessories; create requirements for child-proof packaging and labeling; establish procedures for license denial and a hearing in accordance with KRS Chapter 13B; establish payments in lieu of suspension for licensees and direct the funds to the agency’s revolving trust and agency account and the criminal justice reinvestment fund; establish minimum age of 21 to use or buy cannabis and create status offense for minors under eighteen; ban smoking cannabis in public; and require signs in retail locations regarding minors and the US Surgeon General’s statement on cannabis; create new sections of KRS Chapter 138 to define “cannabis”, “cannabis administrator”, and “cannabis product”; set wholesale tax rates and payment schedules for cannabis cultivator and processor licensees, allow local governments to impose up to a five percent regulatory license fee on cannabis licensees in their territory; establish conditions for tax liability; impose civil penalties for tax violations; create a new section of KRS Chapter 245 to set conditions for the cannabis tax rates effective July 1, 2026 and beyond; amend KRS 2.015 to exempt cannabis from age of majority; amend KRS 241.020 to include a Division of Cannabis in the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control; amend KRS 241.030 to add administrator of the Division of Cannabis; amend KRS 241.060 to add supervision of the cultivation, processing, testing, and trafficking of cannabis to the board’s duties and require Department of Agriculture to review regulations for cultivators prior to filing; amend KRS 241.090 to add cannabis to search provisions; amend KRS 243.025 to direct application fees for cannabis licenses into the agency revolving trust account; amend KRS 218A.1421 to exempt cannabis licenses from trafficking statute; amend KRS 218A.1422 to exempt one ounce of marijuana from possession statute; amend KRS 218A.1423 to permit cannabis cultivator licensees to cultivate under their license; amend KRS 218A.500 to exclude cannabis accessories from drug paraphernalia; create a new section of KRS Chapter 431 to create process for expungement of marijuana misdemeanor charges and to waive fees; amend KRS 431.079 to exclude need for certification of eligibility for expungement; amend KRS 131.1815 to include cannabis licensees in delinquent taxpayer statute; amend KRS 600.020 to include cannabis offenses in the definition of status offense; amend KRS 12.020 to create Division of Cannabis within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. CONTINUE READING…

ADDITIONALLY,

SB 92(BR-1140)/LM/CI(click bill number to view bill details.)

Title:  AN ACT relating to medicinal cannabis.

Sponsor(s):

West , Stephen
Nemes , Michael J.
Yates , David
Parrett , Dennis
Webb , Robin L.
Harper Angel , Denise
Neal , Gerald A.
Embry Jr. , C.B.
McGarvey , Morgan
Higdon , Jimmy
Current Status:

to Committee on Committees (H)
In House

Summary:

Create various new sections of KRS Chapter 218A to define terms; exempt the medicinal cannabis program from existing provisions in Kentucky law to the contrary; require the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control implement and regulate the medicinal cannabis program; establish the Division of Medicinal Cannabis and the Board of Physicians and Advisors within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control; establish restrictions on the possession and use of medicinal cannabis by cardholders; establish certain protections for cardholders; establish professional protections for practitioners, attorneys, and other professionals; provide for the authorizing of practitioners by state licensing boards to issue written certifications for the use medicinal cannabis; prohibit the consumption of medicinal cannabis by smoking; permit an employer to restrict the possession and use of medicinal cannabis by an employee; require the department to implement and operate a registry identification card program; establish requirements for registry identification cards; require the department to operate a provisional licensure receipt system for cardholders; establish the requirements for a registry identification card and the application process; establish notification requirements for cardholders; establish when a registry identification card may be revoked; establish various cannabis business licensure categories; establish requirements for a cannabis business licensure and the application process for a license; prohibit a practitioner from being a board member or principal officer of a cannabis business; prohibit cross-ownership of certain classes of cannabis businesses; establish rules for local sales, including establishing the process by which a local legislative body may prohibit the operation of cannabis businesses within its territory and the process for local ordinances and ballot initiatives; establish technical requirements for cannabis businesses; establish limits on the THC potency of medicinal cannabis that can be produced or sold in the state; establish cultivation square footage limits for cannabis businesses that are permitted to cultivate; establish procedures for the department to inspect cannabis businesses; establish procedures for the suspension or revocation of a cannabis business license; exempt certain records and information from the disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act; require the department to develop, maintain, and operate electronic systems for monitoring the medicinal cannabis program; require the department to promulgate administrative regulations necessary to implement the medicinal cannabis program; establish that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the cost of use; amend KRS 342.815 to establish that the Employer’s Mutual Insurance Authority shall not be required to provide coverage to an employer if doing so would subject the authority to a violation of state or federal law; amend KRS 216B.402 to require hospital emergency departments to report cases of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control; amend KRS 218A.010, 218A.1421, 218A.1422, 218A.1423, and 218A.500 to conform; amend KRS 12.020, 12.252, 15.300, 15.380, 15.398, 15.420, 15A.340, 61.592, 62.120, 131.1815, 211.285, 241.010, 241.015, 241.030, 243.025, 243.0307, 243.038, 243.090, 243.360, 438.310, 438.311, 438.313, 438.315, 438.317, 438.320438.325, 438.330, 438.337, and 438.340 to change the name of the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control; some sections EFFECTIVE July 1, 2022.

HCR63(BR-1238)(click bill number to view bill details.)

Title:  A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION to create the Task Force on Economic Effects of Casino Gambling and Cannabis Legalization.

Sponsor(s):

Cantrell , McKenzie
Current Status:

to Committee on Committees (H)
In House

Summary:

Create the Task Force on Economic Effects of Casino Gambling and Recreational Marijuana Legalization to study economic effects of legalization of casino gambling and cannabis on governments, corrections, judiciary, small business, wages, and employment; establish task force membership; require five meeting of the task force during the 2021 interim and report findings to the Legislative Research Commission by December 1, 2021.

HB 326(BR-390)(click bill number to view bill details.)

Title:  AN ACT relating to the creation of the Kentucky Center for Cannabis Research and making an appropriation therefor.

Sponsor(s):

Moser , Kimberly Poore
Bentley , Danny
Banta , Kim
Bridges , Randy
Frazier , Deanna
Freeland , Chris
Heavrin , Samara
Pratt , Phillip
Reed , Brandon
Santoro , Sal
Sheldon , Steve
Smith , Tom
Tate , Nancy
Massey , C. Ed
Current Status:

to Committee on Committees (H)
In House

Summary:

Create a new section of KRS Chapter 164 to establish the Kentucky Center for Cannabis Research at the University of Kentucky; define the role, mission, and responsibilities of the center; establish the university’s duties related to the center; APPROPRIATION.

HB 136(BR-49)/LM/CI(click bill number to view bill details.)

Title:  AN ACT relating to medicinal cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

Sponsor(s):

Nemes , Jason
Gentry , Al
Lawrence , William
Lewis , Derek
Miller , Charles
Miller , Jerry T.
Koch , Matthew
Osborne , David
Goforth , Robert
Minter , Patti
Kulkarni , Nima
Huff , Thomas
Flood , Kelly
Kirk-McCormick , Norma
Pratt , Phillip
Hatton , Angie
Bojanowski , Tina
Stevenson , Cherlynn
Palumbo , Ruth Ann
Cantrell , McKenzie
Elliott , Daniel
Timoney , Killian
Jenkins , Joni L.
Willner , Lisa
Raymond , Josie
Graham , Derrick
Westrom , Susan
Current Status:

to Committee on Committees (H)
In House

Summary:

Create various new sections of KRS Chapter 218A to define terms; exempt the medicinal cannabis program from existing provisions in Kentucky law to the contrary; require the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control implement and regulate the medicinal cannabis program; establish the Division of Medicinal Cannabis and the Board of Physicians and Advisors within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control ; establish restrictions on the possession and use of medicinal cannabis by cardholders; establish certain protections for cardholders; establish professional protections for practitioners, attorneys, and other professionals; provide for the authorizing of practitioners by state licensing boards to issue written certifications for the use medicinal cannabis; prohibit the consumption of medicinal cannabis by smoking; permit an employer to restrict the possession and use of medicinal cannabis by an employee; require the department to implement and operate a registry identification card program; establish requirements for registry identification cards; establish registry identification card fees; require the department to operate a provisional licensure receipt system for cardholders; establish the requirements for a registry identification card and the application process; establish notification requirements for cardholders; establish when a registry identification card may be revoked; establish various cannabis business licensure categories; establish requirements for a cannabis business licensure and the application process for a license; prohibit a practitioner from being a board member or principal officer of a cannabis business; prohibit cross-ownership of certain classes of cannabis businesses; establish rules for local sales, including establishing the process by which a local legislative body may prohibit the operation of cannabis businesses within its territory and the process for local ordinances and ballot initiatives; establish technical requirements for cannabis businesses; establish limits on the THC potency of medicinal cannabis that can be produced or sold in the state; establish cultivation square footage limits for cannabis businesses that are permitted to cultivate; establish procedures for the department to inspect cannabis businesses; establish procedures for the suspension or revocation of a cannabis business license; exempt certain records and information from the disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act; require the department to develop, maintain, and operate electronic systems for monitoring the medicinal cannabis program; require the department to promulgate administrative regulations necessary to implement the medicinal cannabis program; establish that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the cost of use; establish the medicinal cannabis trust fund; establish the local medicinal cannabis trust fund; establish procedures for the distribution of local cannabis trust fund moneys; create a new section of KRS Chapter 138 to establish an excise tax on certain transfers of medicinal cannabis; amend KRS 216B.402 to require hospital emergency departments to report cases of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control; amend KRS 342.815 to establish that the Employer’s Mutual Insurance Authority shall not be required to provide coverage to an employer if doing so would subject the authority to a violation of state or federal law; amend KRS 139.470 to exempt the sale of medical cannabis from the state sales tax; amend KRS 218A.010, 218A.1421, 218A.1422, 218A.1423, and 218A.500 to conform; amend KRS 12.020, 12.252, 15.300, 15.380, 15.398, 15.420, 15A.340, 61.592, 62.120, 131.1815, 211.285, 241.010, 241.015, 241.030, 243.025, 243.0307, 243.038, 243.090, 243.360, 438.310, 438.311, 438.313, 438.315, 438.317, 438.320438.325, 438.330, 438.337, and 438.340 to change the name of the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control; some sections EFFECTIVE July 1, 2022; APPROPRIATION.

Sam Girod to be released from prison on May 1st!

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The following information was reported on Facebook this morning.

So good to see a innocent person be finally released from the Hell that he never should have experienced in the first place!

The tyrannical Government which has irresponsibly incarcerated more innocent people than virtually anywhere else in the World has to be called into rein. 

From Sally Oh:

Amish farmer Sam Girod is coming home to his family!

ADDRESS TO SEND CARD: 409 Satterfield Lane, Owingsville, KY 40360

The FDA prosecuted him for mislabeling a harmless chickweed salve that his family made and sold for over 20 years. He’s been in federal prison since July 2017 and had 3 more years on his sentence!!!

Sam is my neighbor and a charming, boisterous, outspoken, freedom-loving American. He refused to roll over when the FDA unlawfully threatened and lied to him.

Here’s the story if you don’t know it, please send him a card. He and his family would appreciate that! bit.ly/freeamishsam

Graphic from Owen Yoder, thank you to Carrie Long for sharing the good news with me!!!

SOURCE

RELATED:

Detailed story: FDA’s persecution of Samuel Girod.

KY Amish Farmer Jailed over a Salve Label; the FDA Wants Him Jailed for Life

Free KY Amish Farmer Samuel Girod

This is the story of the FDA’s persecution of Samuel Girod.

Time to Contact our Representatives about Samuel Girod

Free KY Amish Farmer Samuel Girod

Much Thanks and Love to Our Governor Beshear, this Easter.

GovBeshear4.11.20

Above – Gov. Beshear addresses the people of Kentucky on Saturday, April 11th.

A husband and father, whose own Son must forgo his Baptism this Easter Sunday, because of a horrid Virus that is attacking the State of Kentucky as Governor Andrew Beshear spoke to all our Citizens. Informing us, encouraging us and making us understand just how important it is at this time to remain vigilant with “social distancing” – which is terminology which normally I would hate, but in the predicament we find ourselves in currently MUST BE followed.

A man who must face the battle of his life after just having been elected December 10th of 2019, not even having had time to adjust to his new position before having to take on this battle. 

The State of Kentucky is lucky to have Governor Beshear. 

I cannot remember the last time I thought that way about an elected leader in the Governor’s office.  Immediately upon taking Office he restored voting rights to 156,000 Non-Violent Felony Offenders, which was a welcome move.

On this day before Easter, I want to thank Governor Beshear for everything he has done and is doing to help our people survive this war we have been thrown into – for whatever reason, from whatever source.  That is a story for another day.

Today, I just want to Thank Our Lord and Governor Beshear – for caring, and for being there when we need you most.

Trying days are ahead for all of us in this Country.   We will deal with them as they come.  We must learn to help each other and ourselves as much as possible and most of all to care and love one another.

Prayers are being said for those of us across the Country who have succumb to this illness and the families left behind.

Tomorrow is Easter Sunday.  Remember this – your home IS your Church!

“For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I among them.”

Keep your Children close and celebrate this day the Lord hath made, together, in peace and love.

Have a Happy Easter!

COVID-19 Hotline (800) 722-5725

What's open and closed this Easter weekend 2020 in the Halifax ...

https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/kentucky-gov-announces-mandatory-quarantine-anyone-who-attends-easter-services-n1181716

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter

https://louisvilleky.gov/news/what-you-need-know-about-coronavirus

https://nkyhealth.org/individual-or-family/health-alerts/coronavirus/

https://healthalerts.ky.gov/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx

https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19

https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=2900029366722380&ref=notif&notif_id=1586559702458181&notif_t=live_video_explicit

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Beshear

Stimulus Dollars Available for Hemp Farmers and Small Businesses

U.S. Hemp Roundtable info@hempsupporter.com

Great news from Capitol Hill:

Stimulus Dollars Available for Hemp Farmers and Small Businesses


Moments ago, the U.S. House passed the U.S. Senate’s $2 trillion economic stimulus bill, sending to the President’s desk a relief package that will help address the devastating physical and financial distress caused by the COVID-19 virus and response.  Read the entire bill here.

There is great news for hemp farmers as well as small businesses in the hemp space.  While the word “hemp” does not appear in the bill, economic relief is available for the hemp industry through some of the following provisions:

  • $349 billion for the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Business Loans Program Account
  • $17 billion for the SBA’s Business Loans Program Account for payment of covered loans guaranteed by SBA under the Small Business Act
  • $10 billion for SBA’s Emergency Economic Injury Disaster Loans program
  • $265 million for SBA’s Entrepreneurial Development Program
  • $9.5 billion to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for providing support for impacted agricultural producers, including producers of specialty crops
  • $20.5 million to the Rural Business Program Account for the cost of loans for rural business development programs under the Farm and Rural Development Act
  • In general, those with federally-backed mortgaged loans secured by USDA may request forbearance for up to 180 days, during which no fees, penalties, or interest will accrue

It is important to note that under this SBA policy guidance, unlike direct marijuana businesses, legal hemp small businesses are explicitly eligible for SBA’s assistance programs.

Information about how to apply for SBA’s COVID-19 programs can be found here and here.

The USDA is expected to release more information about how farmers and businesses can apply for that agency’s COVID-19 programs at this website in the coming days.

We will keep Hemp Supporters updated as circumstances develop.  Please stay safe and healthy!

SOURCE: RECEIVED BY EMAIL ON FRIDAY 3-27-20Surprised smile

KDA Draft Hemp Regulations Available for Review

KDA Comment Period Open Until April 30

Dear Friends,

As the Commissioner of Agriculture for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, I wanted to draw your attention to new, draft regulations updating Kentucky’s hemp program.

The draft regulations that will govern the administration of the hemp program were recently filed for public comment. A comprehensive document can be found here, and each separate regulation is also available on our website on the “Hemp and the Law”page.

Please know that you can email your comments to KDA directly at hemp@ky.gov until April 30, 2020.

I encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity to review the draft regulations and provide feedback.

In addition, I want to ensure you knew that the Kentucky Department of Agriculture led the effort this session to pass House Bill 236, which updated Kentucky’s hemp laws. This law included two main changes:

· Updating Kentucky’s laws to align our statues with the 2018 Farm Bill; and

· Allowing licensed hemp processors in Kentucky to transport or sell their hemp concentrate to another licensed hemp processor location in Kentucky, if that interaction is reported to and approved by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture at least 24 hours in advance.

Thank you for your interest in this new industry.

LINK TO NEW PROPOSED REGULATIONS (PDF)

Kentucky Department of Agriculture kda@kygov.ccsend.com