(KY) SENATOR DAVID GIVENS’ LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

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For Immediate Release

February 23, 2018

SENATOR DAVID GIVENS’ LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

After weeks of anticipation and months of discussions and meetings with stakeholders, the Kentucky Senate Majority Caucus filed its comprehensive pension reform bill as Senate Bill (SB) 1 on Tuesday, February 20.  While SB 1 marked the filing of one of the most significant pieces of legislation of the 2018 Session, we continued to hold committee meetings and voted bills out of the Senate chamber, making for another busy week in Frankfort.

In addressing our pension crisis, our goal was to balance the harsh reality of the fiscal health of the retirement systems with the expectations of current public employees, teachers, and retirees.  We worked to do just that while respecting the taxpayers of the Commonwealth, many of whom do not have a retirement plan of any kind.  I am proud to report that Senate Bill 1 is a data-driven plan that reflects hard work, numerous revisions, and most importantly, input from public employees.  We listened to your feedback and this plan reflects that.

This massive $40 billion pension problem occurred due to a combination of factors, such as failed promises by previous administrations to fund pensions at the level requested by the retirement systems, the Great Recession from 2008 to 2012, and pension board mismanagement of administrative costs, investments, and a failure to meet projected returns.  However, this new approach finally puts our state on the path to solvency.

This plan does not place any future state employees into a defined contribution, or a 401(k)-style, retirement plan, and it will not force any current or future state employees into a 401(k) plan.  It will not create a retirement “cliff” by preventing current employees or teachers from accruing more service credit in their defined benefit plan.

Most importantly, this proposal solves Kentucky’s $40 billion unfunded pension problem by changing how state government funds pensions.  Kentucky will convert to a “level dollar funding formula” which means the unfunded liability will be completely paid off within thirty years by making a large payment each year—just like paying off your home mortgage.  Under this funding plan, the retirement systems will receive hundreds of millions more in funding each year, going above and beyond the minimum payment to more quickly pay down the debt.  I look forward to continuing the pension discussion as the bill moves through the legislative process.

One of the first pieces of legislation we passed this week was Senate Resolution 149, which recognizes the role the hospitality industry can play in disrupting child sex trafficking and encouraging residents, employees, and agencies to use hotels and venues which are signatories of the Tourism Child-Protection Code of Conduct, known as The Code.  The Code is a voluntary multi-stakeholder initiative with the mission to provide awareness, tools, and support to the tourism industry to prevent the sexual exploitation of children.

We also passed a number of other bills in the Senate this week: Senate Bill 119 lays out the legal carcass disposal methods for cervid (deer) meat processors; Senate Bill 149 and SB 126 are both reorganization bills for the Cabinet for Health and Family Services; Senate Bill 109 updates the statutory definition of rape; and House Bill 74 aims to deter the resell of stolen goods to pawnbrokers by making the pawnbrokers’ registers more transparent and requiring secondhand merchandise sold to a pawnbroker to be held a minimum of 12 days before being resold.

The budget is still in the hands of the House of Representatives, but we expect to receive it in the Senate in the coming weeks.  We have already begun an intensive review process, and once it is in our possession, we will continue that process while making our own changes.  It is a lengthy and strenuous process, but I am confident that the final product will be fiscally responsible while ensuring sufficient funding for our critical programs.

If you have any questions or comments about these issues or any other public policy issue, please call me toll-free at 1-800-372-7181.  You can also review the Legislature’s work online at www.lrc.ky.gov.

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Note:  Senator David Givens (R-Greensburg) represents the 9th District including Allen, Barren, Green, Metcalfe, Monroe and Simpson Counties.  He serves as a member of the Appropriations and Revenue Committee, the Agriculture Committee, the Education Committee, the Enrollment Committee, and the Health and Welfare Committee. For a high-resolution .jpeg of Senator Givens, please log onto http://www.lrc.ky.gov/pubinfo/portraits/senate09.jpg.

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(Louisville, KY) Medical Marijuana Town Hall Comment Form

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The following comment form is being circulated to give the Citizens of the Louisville Metro area of Kentucky a chance to voice their opinions concerning the ongoing medical marijuana discussions in the Legislature.

Please take a moment if you live in this area to fill out the form and let them hear your feelings on this subject.

Thank You!

Medical Marijuana Town Hall Comment Form

Louisville Metro Council’s Health and Education Committee Medical Marijuana Town Hall Comment Form. The Louisville Metro Council values your input on a resolution under consideration regarding the legalization of Medical Marijuana.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE LINK TO THE COMMENT FORM!

Important Bills to watch in Kentucky

Every so often I post emails containing the Bills being worked on in Kentucky, from the Legislature.  I thought I would post a list for the Medical Marijuana and adult use Cannabis Bills, and a few other Bills of interest as well.  There are several hundred this year and there is no way anyone could keep up with all of them.  I encourage you to go to the link and browse them for yourself.  It can be interesting and informative reading!

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By clicking on the above LINK you will access the website of the Kentucky Legislature.

Then you can access Bill Watch and register to track the bills that interest YOU.

Bill Watch – This free service enables Kentucky.gov registered users unlimited tracking of legislation during the Kentucky Legislative Session.

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Cannabis Bills include:

SB 80 (BR 906) Sponsors:  Dan Malano Seum  / An Act To Regulate Cannabis.

HB 166 (BR 184) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT relating to medical cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

SB 118 (BR 1392) Sponsor: Multiple / AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

HCR 34 (BR 447) Sponsors: Multiple / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION calling for the expediting of research regarding the safety and efficacy of the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

SB 23 (BR 163)  Sponsors:  Julian M Carroll; Reginald Thomas; Denise Harper Angel; / AN ACT relating to cannabidiol use.  Create a new section of KRS Chapter 218A to permit a physician to recommend the use of cannabidiol or cannabidiol products;

Hemp Bills include:

HCR 35 (BR 878) Sponsors:  DJ Johnson; Kimberly Poore Moser / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging Congress to amend the federal Controlled Substances Act to remove hemp from the definition of marijuana.

Other Issues:

HB 35 (BR  173)  Sponsors:  C. Wesley Morgan / AN ACT relating to public assistance.  Amend KRS 205.200 to create a substance abuse screening program for adult recipients of public assistance, food stamps, and state medical assistance.

HCR  106 (BR  1116)  Sponsors:  Multiple / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging Congress and the President of the United States to enact a long-term reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

HB 243 (BR 313) Sponsors:  Toby Herald; Adam Koenig / AN ACT relating to the consolidation of counties.

HB 242 (BR 331) Sponsors:  Toby Herald / AN ACT relating to school districts.

SB 2 (BR 308) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT proposing an amendment to Section 54 of the Constitution of Kentucky. / The General Assembly shall have power to Limit the amount to be recovered for injuries resulting in death. / allow the General Assembly the power to limit damages for injuries resulting in death or for injuries to persons or property, and to provide a uniform statute of limitations;

HB 124 (BR 139) Sponsors: Addia Wuchner;  Kimberly Poore Moser / AN ACT relating to enhanced standards and criteria for substance use disorder treatment and recovery services and programs and declaring an emergency.

HB 213 (BR 1202) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to data-sharing of prescription drug monitoring information.  Amend KRS 218A.245 to allow KASPER data-sharing agreements with different types of jurisdictions.

HB 148 (BR 440)  Sponsors: Addia Wuchner; Kimberly Poore Moser /AN ACT relating to prescription medications in hospice programs.   Create a new section of KRS Chapter 381 to shift ownership of controlled substances from a deceased hospice patient to a hospice program so the hospice program may dispose of the controlled substances.

HB 115 (BR 260)  Sponsors:  Robby Mills / AN ACT relating to reporting prescriptions to terminate a pregnancy.  Amend KRS 213.101 to require a physician to report a prescription for mifeprex, misoprostol, or any other drug or combination of drugs that are intended to end a pregnancy…

SB 5 (BR 216) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to pharmacy benefits in the Medicaid program.  Create a new section of KRS Chapter 205 to require the Department for Medicaid Services to directly administer all outpatient pharmacy benefits; prohibit renewal or negotiation of new contracts to provide Medicaid managed care that allow administration of outpatient benefits by any entity but the Department for Medicaid Services;

HB 85 (BR 126)  Sponsors:  Scott Wells; / AN ACT relating to elimination of the certificate of need.  Amend KRS 13B.020 to delete reference to certificate of need hearings; amend KRS 79.080 to replace the Kentucky Health Facilities and Health Services Certificate of Need and Licensure Board with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services;

HB 167 (BR 400) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to abandoned infants. Amend KRS 405.075 to establish a definition and allow the use of a “newborn safety device” related to the anonymous surrendering of a newborn infant in the Commonwealth.

HR 98 (BR 1061) Sponsors:  Multiple / A RESOLUTION urging the United States Congress to propose an amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America promoting equality of citizenship by establishing that artificial entities, such as corporations, associations, or other similar groups, are not persons and can be regulated, and that money is not speech and can be regulated.

SB 4 (BR 110) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT proposing to amend Section 95 of the Constitution of Kentucky relating to the election of state officers.  Propose to amend Section 95 of the Constitution of Kentucky to hold the election of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Auditor of Public Accounts, Attorney General, Secretary of State and Commissioner of Agriculture, Labor and Statistics in even-numbered years, every four years, beginning in 2024;

HB 195 (BR 1056) Sponsors: Multiple / Amend KRS 344.010 to include definitions for “sexual orientation” and “gender identity”; amend KRS 344.020, relating to the purpose of the Kentucky’s civil rights chapter, to include a prohibition against discrimination because of sexual orientation and gender identity.

HB 303 (BR 1059) Sponsors: Multiple / Amend KRS 337.010, relating to the definition of “employees” of retail stores and service industries, to increase the applicable threshold of business that applies to from $95,000 to $500,000; amend KRS 337.275 to raise the state minimum wage to not less than $8.80 an hour on August 1, 2018, not less than $10.35 an hour beginning on August 1, 2019, not less than $11.90 an hour beginning on August 1, 2020, not less than $13.45 an hour beginning on August 1, 2021, and not less than $15.00 per hour beginning on August 1, 2022;

SB 48 (BR 265) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT relating to child marriage. Amend KRS 402.020 to establish a new minimum age for marriage; amend KRS 402.030 to establish the power of courts to declare a marriage void when one party is under 18 years of age; amend KRS 402.210 to prohibit individuals under the age of 17 years from marrying; establish the process for a 17- year old to petition a court for permission to marry and the criteria for granting the petition; repeal KRS 402.260 which provides for the estate of minors who marry to be placed in receivership until they reach the age of 18 years.

(KY) This Week at the State Capitol (Jan. 29 – Feb. 2)

February 2, 2018

This Week at the State Capitol (Jan. 29 – Feb. 2)

Pace quickens in second month of legislative session

FRANKFORT – As lawmakers enter the second month of the Kentucky General Assembly’s 2018 session, action already has been taken on a number of fronts that could have impacts across the state.

Lawmakers have approved a measure to allow Kentuckians to vote in November on a proposed state constitutional amendment to create what’s been referred to as a “bill of rights” for crime victims.

Budget subcommittees are digging into the details of the governor’s proposed spending plan to fully understand the potential impact of proposed cuts, as well as certain areas where spending increases are proposed. In the coming weeks, lawmakers will begin weighing which parts of the budget plan they want to adjust to make sure the final plan is one that matches their priorities for the state.

Meanwhile, almost 300 bills have been introduced for consideration in the Senate and House. The amount of legislation moving through the process will continue growing each day up as more bills are filed and advanced through the legislative committee system.

Bills that took steps forward this week include:

· Senate Bill 37 would allow some nonviolent federal prisoners to get driver’s licenses so they can work outside of prison walls. SB 37 would also amend current law to included federal prisoners under existing regulations that allow state prisoners to receive driver’s licenses or identification cards upon release. SB 37 passed the Senate by a 36-0 vote. The measure now goes to the House for further consideration.

· House Bill 52 would require any child under age 12 to wear a helmet while riding a bicycle. While the bill does not impose fines for not wearing a helmet, the intent is to increase safety for children while cycling. After passing the House Transportation Committee, HB 52 now goes to the full House for consideration.

· Under House Bill 84, coroners or medical examiners would be required to verify the organ and tissue donation wishes of a deceased person in their care. Such information is now released by coroners and medical examiners to Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates upon the group’s request, but the intent of this bill is to increase urgency in this process. HB 84 passed the House by a vote of 88-0 and now goes to the Senate for consideration.

· Senate Bill 68 would clarify that a victim of domestic violence is not required to pay divorce costs of a spouse locked up for crimes against the petitioner. Under current state law, someone seeking a divorce against an incarcerated person can be held responsible for paying the incarcerated person’s court-appointed lawyer, even when the imprisonment is the result of spousal abuse. This bill was passed by the Senate this week by a 37-0 vote and has been delivered to the House.

· House Bill 132 would require Kentucky public high school students to fulfill a financial literacy requirement to graduate. The bill was approved this week by a vote of 68-24 in the state House and now goes to the Senate.

· ­Senate Bill 72 would curtail the naming of state buildings, roads and bridges after living politicians in Kentucky with the intent to take the politics out of these naming decisions. Passing with a 35-3 vote in the Senate, it now goes to the state House for further consideration.

Legislators are eager to receive feedback on the issues confronting our state. To share your thoughts and ideas with state lawmakers, please call the General Assembly’s toll-free message line at (800) 372-7181.

–END–

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Gov. Bevin To Announce Launch of Find Help Now Website, Student Opioid Awareness Marketing Competition

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2018) – Gov. Matt Bevin will join representatives from the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet and the University of Kentucky’s Injury Prevention and Research Center to announce the launch of FindHelpNowKY.org. The website allows users to search in real-time for a substance use disorder (SUD) treatment center and will be promoted as part of the Don’t Let Them Die campaign.

Gov. Bevin will also be joined by WLKY-TV to announce a joint integrated marketing and advertising campaign contest for high school students, designed to raise awareness about the dangers of drug use and addiction.

This event will be livestreamed on Gov. Bevin’s official Facebook page. 

Who:

Gov. Matt Bevin
Dr. Jeffrey Howard, Department of Public Health
Sec. John Tilley, Justice & Public Safety Cabinet
Dr. Terry Bunn, UK Injury Prevention & Research Center
Andrea Stahlman, WLKY

What:

Launch of FindHelpNowKY.org and student opioid awareness marketing competition

When:

Friday, Feb. 2, 2018
10:45 a.m. (EST)

Where:

State Capitol Rotunda
700 Capital Avenue
Frankfort, Kentucky

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Governor of Kentucky

Questions? Contact us

(KY) SB 118–Relating to Medical Cannabis

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Thank you Senator Steve West for giving KY patients the freedom to try cannabis.  SB118 will give patients the choice to try cannabis for their condition without fear of prosecution, imprisonment, loss of parental rights…LINK

SB 118(BR-1392)(click bill number to view bill details.)

Title:  AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

Sponsor(s):

West , Stephen
Seum , Dan “Malano”
Clark , Perry B.
Thomas , Reginald
Embry Jr. , C.B.

Current Status:

introduced in Senate
In Senate

Summary:

Create new sections of KRS Chapter 218A to define terms; restrict medical cannabis to certain patients with qualifying debilitating conditions; establish requirements for cultivation, production, processing, distribution, and sale in compassion centers; establish requirements for patients, visiting patients, and caregivers; establish professional protections for practitioners; establish certain protections for cardholders; establish responsibilities for cardholders; allow restrictions on possession, possession while operating a motor vehicle, and smoking; specify that use of medical cannabis by a qualifying patient is to be treated the same as use of prescribed pharmaceutical medications; establish additional protections for medical use; specify that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the costs of use or prohibits an employer from disciplining an employee for workplace impairment; establish a medical purpose defense for some uses of medical cannabis; establish the Department for Medical Cannabis Administration to enforce the program’s provisions;  LINK

https://secure.kentucky.gov/billwatch/BillSummary.aspx?br_rsn=41570&ses_rsn=101

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/18RS/SB118/bill.pdf

(LOUISVILLE, KY) Attorney General Sessions Delivers Remarks on Efforts to Reduce Violent Crime and Fight the Opioid Crisis

Attorney General Sessions Delivers Remarks on Efforts to Reduce Violent Crime and Fight the Opioid Crisis

Louisville, KY – Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Thank you, Russel for that introduction, for your leadership in this office, and for your service as an FBI Special Agent.  As a former senator, I am certain that your experience as a hostage negotiator must have been useful for Senator McConnell.  But seriously, you’ve made big sacrifices for this country and I want you to know that we are grateful.  And I am confident that the people of Western Kentucky are in good hands.
Before I say anything else I want to offer my condolences to the people of Kentucky, who are still in mourning over the senseless shooting that took place in Marshall County last week.  This morning Amy Hess, the FBI Special Agent in Charge for Louisville, briefed me on the shooting, and I want you to know that this Department will do whatever we can to be of assistance. Our FBI experts are some of the best but there are no easy answers.
I want to thank you for your hospitality.  This is my 34th visit to a U.S. Attorney’s Office.  I’m always inspired to meet the attorneys, investigators, and officers who are in the trenches every day making us safer.
On behalf of President Trump, I want to thank all of the law enforcement officers who are here with us today.  He strongly supports you and honors what you do.
In particular I want to recognize Commissioner Rick Sanders of the Kentucky State Police.  Rick has taken the lead on the response to last week’s shooting.  I’m honored that you’re here and I want to thank you for your 24 years in the DEA and 40 years of service in law enforcement.  You have made a real difference in this community.
It was largely because of officers like all of you that crime declined in America for 20 years.
From 2014 to 2016, however, the trends reversed.  The violent crime rate went up by nearly seven percent.  Robberies went up.  Assaults went up nearly 10 percent.  Rape went up by nearly 11 percent.  Murder shot up by more than 20 percent.
Meanwhile, our country has suffered the deadliest drug crisis in our history.  More Americans are dying because of drugs than ever before. In 2016, an estimated 64,000 Americans died of drug overdose—one every nine minutes.  That’s roughly the population of Bowling Green dead in one year.  And in 2017 it appears that the death toll was even higher.
For Americans under the age of 50, drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death.  And millions of Americans are living with the daily struggle of an addiction.
Sadly, Louisville knows this all too well.

The murder rate doubled in Louisville in just two years.  And in December, the Major City Police Chiefs Association of America ranked Louisville as the 11th most dangerous city in the United States.
Meanwhile more people are dying from drug overdoses than ever before.  More than 1,400 Kentuckians died of overdoses in 2016.  Nearly half of these deaths were the result of fentanyl, and a third involved heroin. 
But as we all know, these are not numbers—these are moms, dads, daughters, spouses, friends, and neighbors.
But let me tell you this: we will not stand back and let crime and addiction rise.  Plain and simple, we will not allow the progress made by our women and men in blue over the past two decades to slip through our fingers.  We will not cede one block or one street corner to violent thugs or poison peddlers.
President Trump knows how to give clear orders.  The day I was sworn in as Attorney General, he sent me a simple, straightforward executive order: reduce crime in America.
At the Department of Justice, we embrace that goal.  And you and I know from experience that it can be done.  Crime rates aren’t like the tides—we can take action to help bring them down.
And over the past year, we have taken action.  In 2017, the Department of Justice brought cases against the greatest number of violent criminals in a quarter of a century.  We charged the most federal firearm prosecutions in a decade.  We also arrested and charged hundreds of people suspected of contributing to the ongoing opioid crisis. 
We secured the convictions of nearly 500 human traffickers and 1,200 gang members, and worked with our international allies to arrest or charge more than 4,000 MS-13 members.
MS-13 didn’t like that, by the way.  I saw a news report last week from Voice of America that the MS-13 gang leaders back in El Salvador have taken notice of these efforts.  They know that hundreds of their members are now behind bars.  So now they’re trying to send younger and more violent gang members to the United States to replenish their depleted ranks.
Nationally we are beginning to see positive signs.  In the first six months of last year, the increase in the murder rate slowed significantly and violent crime actually went down.  Publicly available data for the rest of the year suggest further progress.
These are major accomplishments that benefit the American people. And these are your accomplishments.
At the Department of Justice, we are well aware that 85 percent of law enforcement is state, local, and tribal.  These are the authorities that have the critical street level intelligence regarding the criminal element.
We are most effective when these experienced state and local investigators are paired with the resources and expertise of the 15 percent that are our federal law enforcement.
That is the idea behind our crime reduction strategy: Project Safe Neighborhoods, or PSN. PSN encourages U.S. Attorneys’ offices to work with the communities they serve to customize their crime reduction strategies.
And this is a proven model.  One study showed that, in its first seven years, PSN reduced violent crime overall by 4.1 percent, with case studies showing reductions in certain areas of up to 42 percent.  There are Americans who are alive and well today because this program made a difference.
We understand that every district and even every city is different.  I have directed Russell and our other U.S. Attorneys to target the most violent criminals in the most violent areas and to work with local police chiefs, mayors, community groups and victims’ advocates to develop a custom crime reduction plan.  Listening to the people you serve was a winning strategy for me when I was a U.S. Attorney, and I know it will be a winning strategy for you.
In fact, it already is.  Russell and the men and women in this office have done an exemplary job of using this PSN model.  I’m particularly impressed with the Louisville Metro Intelligence—or LMINTEL—which is an intelligence-gathering collaboration between Chris Evans of the DEA, Amy Hess of the FBI, Stuart Lowrey of ATF, the Marshals Service, Commonwealth Attorney Tom Wine, and Chief Conrad of Louisville police.
In the past year, LMINTEL has led to 140 arrests.  Just last week, thanks in part to LMINTEL, a felon who threatened to kill a Louisville Police Officer got a substantial sentence in federal court.
Our goal is not to fill up the prisons.  Our goal is to reduce crime, just as President Trump directed us to do.
I’m also impressed with Project Recoil, which is a PSN partnership between ATF, this office, and state, county, and local law enforcement.  The goal is to charge violent offenders with the most serious provable offense—and maximize their sentence.  I’ve seen how you’ve put away felons possessing firearms for 10 and even 15 years.  These successes prevent violence and make would-be criminals think twice.
You’re doing great work for the people of Western Kentucky.
We are right to celebrate these victories.  But we still have a lot more work to do reduce violent crime and turn the tide of the opioid epidemic.
That’s why we are also taking steps to decrease the number of overdose deaths.
For example, in August I announced a new data analytics program – the Opioid Fraud and Abuse Detection Unit
. I created this unit to focus specifically on opioid-related health care fraud.  It uses data to identify and prosecute individuals that are contributing to this opioid epidemic.  It can tell us important information about prescription opioids—like who is prescribing the most drugs, who is dispensing the most drugs, and whose patients are dying of overdoses.
The numbers don’t lie—even if the fraudsters do.  And now the fraudsters can’t hide.
I have also assigned experienced prosecutors in opioid hot spot districts to focus solely on investigating and prosecuting opioid-related health care fraud. I have sent these prosecutors to where they are especially needed—including Kentucky.
And in November the DEA reorganized its field divisions for the first time in nearly 20 years. 

The Louisville field office is now upgraded to become the Louisville Field Division, with jurisdiction over Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia.


Now I am announcing today that, over the next 45 days, DEA will surge Special Agents, Diversion Investigators, and Intelligence Research Specialists to focus on pharmacies and prescribers who are dispensing unusual or disproportionate amounts of drugs.
DEA collects some 80 million transaction reports every year from manufacturers and distributors of prescription drugs.  These reports contain information like distribution figures and inventory.  DEA will aggregate these numbers to find patterns, trends, statistical outliers—and put them into targeting packages.
That will help us make more arrests, secure more convictions—and ultimately help us reduce the number of prescription drugs available for Americans to get addicted to or overdose from these dangerous drugs.
I want to personally express my deep appreciation and profound thanks to all the women and men of law enforcement and their families, for sacrificing so much and putting your lives on the line every day so that the rest of us may enjoy the safety and security you provide.  We love you and honor your work.
You can be certain about this: we have your back and you have our thanks.

Speaker:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions

Topic(s):

Drug Trafficking

Violent Crime

Component(s):

Office of the Attorney General

SOURCE LINK