Debate on Foreign Policy, War and Peace, scheduled for September 30th in Lexington and will include Democrat, Republican, Green Party and Libertarian Party Leaders in Kentucky

Debate in LEXINGTON KENTUCKY: Foreign Policy, War and Peace

 

Kentucky Green Party  Image result for Libertarian party kentucky  Image result for democrat party kentucky  Image result for republican party kentucky

 

See Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1804070499806582/

The panel debate will be on Friday, September 30 from 7:00 to 9:00 pm in Lexington on the campus of the Bluegrass Community & Technical College (BCTC) on Cooper Drive – Oswald Bldg. Auditorium, Room 230.

Four of the 6 participants have already confirmed, so the show will definitely go on and they include the following:

Ken Moellman, Libertarian Party

Bernadene Zennie, Green Party

Jason Belcher, a Democrat who will represent the positions of Hillary Clinton and the DNC,

T.J. Litafik, a Republican who will represent the positions of Donald Trump,

Others who have been invited are Senator Rand Paul (R) and someone designated by the Jim Gray (D) campaign as well. If Sen. Paul cannot make it, he is invited to send a surrogate.

There will be a neutral moderator and a timekeeper. All media are invited to cover the action. Initial questions will have time limits of 3 to 4 minutes per person, and will deal with topics such as the following:

“The US has approximately 700 to 900 military bases all over the world. No other country does. Is that the way things should be, and why or why not?”

 
Was the invasion of Iraq in 2003 by former President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney a good idea, or was it a case of illegal aggression?

 
Many Democratic and Republican members of Congress and candidates are expressing hostility to Russia. Is that wise?

What should the US be doing with regard to the conflict in Syria, which has been going on for the last 5 years?

Was President Obama’s bombing of Libya in 2011, which was supported by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, a case of international aggression?

Should our defense budget be decreased, increased or kept about the same?”

There will also be cards for members of the audience to write questions on, if time allows. Panelists will be encouraged to rebut things other panelists say.

 

Moderator: Dr. Michael Benton, BCTC
Sponsors: BCTC Students for Peace & Earth Justice
Central Kentucky Council for Peace & Justice

Yours in Peace,
Geoff Young
Member, Peace Action Task Group
Central Kentucky Council for Peace & Justice
(859) 278-4966

U.S. Attorney General addresses opioid, heroin addiction during Richmond town hall

BY CRITLEY KING CNHI News Service

Lynch

RICHMOND — U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch spoke to a crowded auditorium at a Town Hall meeting in Richmond as part of the Obama Administration’s newly designated National Prescription Opium and Heroin Epidemic Awareness Week.

The audience, mainly consisting of young people, was addressed on the dangers of heroin and opioid addiction, the pathways that lead to destruction, and the redeeming hope that help is available.

“I want to hear your questions, I want to hear your comments, I want to hear your ideas about how we can solve this (crisis), and about how we can prevent this,” said Lynch on Tuesday at Madison Central High School. “It’s not just putting people in jail, its about stopping it before it happens. And making sure people that do have a problem get treated.”

In her opening comments, Lynch asked the nearly 500 students if they had been considering where they would go to college, what careers they had planned for their futures, whether as journalists, doctors, law enforcement, teachers or fashion bloggers.

Then, Lynch told the students to look around at their classmates and friends and asked them to consider that last year, in Kentucky, approximately 12,000 died from opioid and heroin abuse overdoses.

“Imagine if all of you and others who fill these chairs were suddenly gone,” said Lynch. “And then that each of you had a friend, just one of your friends each, all gone. That’s what happened last year in Kentucky. That’s why this is so important.”

The chief law enforcement officer in the U.S. spoke about not only the problem of substance abuse and how to stop it, but also how to prevent it from even starting.

Lynch also put out a call to action to the students.

“We are talking to young people like you, because you have a role in this effort,” she said. “We want you to understand the issues, we went you to understand how serious it is, and we went to give you the information you need to make good choices in your own life. We also need you to look out for each other.”

During a question and answer session with local high school students, Kayla Greene, who lost her son to overdose, Tonya Snyder, MCHS social worker, Alex Elswick, a recovered addict, and MCHS student Julia Rahimzadeh, joined Lynch onstage.

Later in the day, Lynch traveled to make remarks at the University of Kentucky. Both events were part of the awareness week and the President’s Cabinet and Federal agencies’ focus on work being done/new efforts to address the national prescription opioid and heroin epidemic, according to a release by the Office of the Press Secretary.

The release also noted that Federal agencies are currently taking actions such as:

Expanding substance abuse treatment in the TRICARE system so that it includes intensive outpatient programs and treatment of opioid disorders with medication-assisted treatment.

Working with the Chinese government to combat the supply of fentanyl and its analogues from entering the U.S.

Increasing patient limits from 100 to 275 for practitioners prescribing buprenorphine to treat opioid use disorders.

Support programs that increase access to healthcare, substance abuse treatment, and educational opportunities in rural areas, such as telemedicine and distance learning.

Currently, the President is seeking $1.1 billion in new funding to combat opioid abuse.

During a press conference following the town hall meeting, Lynch told The Register, that one of the ways the Department of Justice funding specifically would assist communities on a local level would be through a grant making process that provides assistance to law enforcement through grants for additional officers, resources to help states improve their prescription drug monitoring programs and provide examples of programs that are working efficiently and consistently.

Lynch reiterated that administration wide, when treatment is spoken of, they are referring to improving and increasing the availability of treatment facilities and also treatment within local hospitals.

Critley King writes for The Richmond Register.

CONTINUE READING…

The Law of Unintended Consequences: Illicit for Licit Narcotic Substitution

Image result for heroin plant

Originally written July 15, 2014 at LINK below

Martin R. Huecker, MD and Hugh W. Shoff, MD, MS

 

The dealers will not use it. Heroin dealers have explicit knowledge of the addictive properties of their product. The heroin addict is no longer the desperate character living under a bridge. She is a 17-year-old high school senior who runs out of her grandmother’s oxycodone. He is the stockbroker who weighs the economics of purchasing one oxymorphone on the street for $100 or ten doses of heroin for $200. Because these people are ingesting and injecting products of unknown composition and unfamiliar potency, they can potentially overdose. If lucky, they end up in the emergency department rather than the morgue.

Kentucky ranks third in the nation in drug overdose mortality rate per 100,000 persons, with opioid pills making up the majority.1 In response to these statistics, the State of Kentucky passed House Bill One (HB1) in April 2012, effective October 2012. Also known as “the pill mill bill,” HB1 contains provisions intended to limit opioid prescriptions by pain management physicians and by other acute care providers such as emergency physicians. To prescribe narcotic pain medications, physicians must perform a full history and physical, prescribe only a short course, educate the patient on risks of controlled substances, and obtain a report from a statewide prescription monitoring program (PMP) (Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting [KASPER]).2

As a result, the number of registered KASPER users in Kentucky has gone from 7500 to 23,000 from December, 2011 to November, 2012. Reports are up from 3300 to 17000 in the same time frame.3 According to the same press release, Kentucky witnessed a decrease of 10.4% total prescriptions in the first six months since HB1 was enacted.3

Mandating PMP reports, as sixteen states currently do, leads to an increase in reports, but so far no statistical difference in opioid overdose mortality.1,4,5,6 In fact, this legislation may not even lower the rate of opioid consumption, rather may shift which opioids are being prescribed.6

Researchers in Ohio looked at the impact of real time PMP information on opioid prescriptions. With PMP data, providers changed prescriptions in 41% of cases; 61% giving fewer opioids but 39% prescribing more opioids.7

House Bill One was intended to and has reduced opioid prescriptions in Kentucky. Forty-four pain clinics in Kentucky closed overnight.8 Preliminary analysis at a large, metropolitan emergency department has shown a decrease in prescriptions for hydrocodone and oxycodone, along with a decrease in ED administration of these medications. This type of “pill mill” legislation has been passed in Louisiana, Florida, Texas and California with varying results.9

Florida had a sharp decrease in opioid prescriptions after similar legislation. Having 90 of the top 100 physicians on the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) 2010 list of top opioid purchasers, Florida saw the number decrease to 13 in 2011, and zero as of April 2013.10 In 2011, Ohio passed a “pill mill bill” to crack down on pain management clinics.11 This legislation led to seizing of 91,000 prescription pills with 38 doctors and 13 pharmacists losing their medical licenses. In the end, 15 medical professionals were convicted on diversion charges.11 With all of this, pill overdose deaths began to decline, but heroin overdoses “skyrocketed.”11

The unintended but foreseeable consequence of such measures has been increase in distribution, abuse, and overdose of heroin. Heroin has gained market share in a similar way in the past. In 2010, Purdue Pharma began manufacturing a reformulated OxyContin after a $600 million fine for misrepresentation.12 Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc. followed in 2011 with an Opana ER reformulation. This resulted in making the pills harder to crush into powder for snorting or injecting.13,14 States such as Florida, Ohio, Minnesota, and Utah have seen patients turn to heroin after crackdown on prescription opioid availability.11,14

The New England Journal of Medicine warned us of what would be a two-fold increase in heroin use after the reformulation of Oxycontin.15 In the 2010 ODLL report, the United States DEA also attempted to warn health care organizations that Oxycontin users might switch to heroin.16,17 The first paper we know of to report this warning was published 3 years later in 2013.16 This paper, a qualitative study of the transition of opioid pill users to heroin users, provides insight into the economic and convenience factors associated with the switch. The researchers interviewed a small sample of heroin users, forty-one in all. All but one of the 19 heroin users aged 20–29 started with pills and progressed to heroin – “termed pill initiates.”16

Numerous popular news reports directly implicate decreased opioid pill availability in the rise of heroin abuse and overdose.16 However, very little discussion of this phenomenon has entered the emergency medicine literature.

The drug cartels have capitalized on the United States opioid appetite and now decreased supply of pills. The route from Mexico to Detroit, then south through Ohio, ends up in northern and central Kentucky. The Kentucky State Police recovered 433 samples of heroin in 2010. In 2012 the number was 1349.13 In Lexington, KY, the eight total heroin arrests in 2011 exploded into 160 in the first 6 months of 2013.18,19 Undercover narcotics officers in Lexington find it easier to buy heroin than marijuana.

Heroin-related overdoses in Kentucky increased from 22 cases in 2011 to 143 cases in 2012, and 170 in the first 9 months of 2013.8,20,21 Kentucky’s percentage of overdose deaths involving heroin went from 3.2 in 2011 to 19.5 in 2012 and up to 26 in 2013.8.21 This phenomenon has occurred in Florida, California, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Washington and Ohio.11,2224

The emergency medicine literature has minimal recent discussion of heroin overdose management in the ED; nor have we discussed secondary prevention. Supportive therapy suffices in the ED, with liberal naloxone use and airway protection. State and federal actions to curb heroin deaths can be effective. Good Samaritan laws, present in only one third of states, protect from prosecution those lay individuals attempting to help themselves or companions in overdose situations.

Also present in only one third of states are laws to expand community access to reversal agents such as naloxone. Twenty-two states have laws requiring or recommending education for opioid prescribers. Medicaid expansion to cover substance abuse treatment has occurred thus far in less than half (24) of states.1

As more states enact measures intended to reduce total opioid prescriptions, legislators and healthcare providers alike must be aware of the predictable and devastating rise in heroin sales, abuse, and overdose. Funding for this legislation should include monies allocated toward substance abuse treatment programs and availability of naloxone. Similarly, pill mill bills could universally be coupled with Good Samaritan laws in anticipation of the increase in parenteral opioid overdoses. Funds could be allocated to lay population education via public service announcements. Stricter punishments for drug traffickers could accompany such legislative changes. Many of these measures have been presented as interventions to combat prescription opioid abuse and can now be applied to the subsequent heroin abuse and overdose dilemma.9

At the first line of medical care, emergency physicians must be involved in efforts to minimize collateral damage in this long-term process of curing America’s addiction to opioid drugs and their horrible consequences.

CONTINUE READING…

Mike Lewis and the Growing Warriors

By Andrew Baker  – Sep 20, 2016

 

mike-lewis-and-the-growing-warriors

One of the things I love most about our industry is that it’s constantly being shaken up. Everywhere you look, there’s an individual or a company taking things to a previously unprecedented level. What’s even more amazing is the pace at which things are moving; a pace that’s only going to increase in speed as the industry becomes more open and recognized.

To help illustrate what I mean, think about this: If you have kids that are, say 5 years old or younger, there is a good chance that you won’t need to teach them how to drive. At least not the way you or I learned. It’s entirely possible that our kids will never have to grab a steering wheel or press a gas pedal.

Don’t worry, I’ll wait while you go ahead and put your brain back together.

But you see, these types of technological advancements aren’t being made in exclusivity. Strides like what I described above aren’t possible simply because the automobile industry is so advanced. The technology that would go into a self-driving car could be repurposed, tweaked just a little bit, and put to use in something like virtual reality. It can, and often does, work the other way around as well.

The cannabis industry is no exception, as we’re starting to see. I really enjoy tech — and I’m obsessed with entrepreneurship — so the flood of cannabis startups is an exciting thing to watch. Typing all this out makes me realize two things. One, I haven’t tackled this sort of topic in any of my previous posts. Two, I’m eager to do so for you guys.

But that’ll have to wait.

What? You thought all of that was to lead up to me covering some sort of futuristic weed tech? Nope. I just needed a good segue to what I’ll be talking about in today’s post. Who, actually, not what.

His name is Mike Lewis and he’s shaking things up in a simple but powerful way and he’s doing it with just his hands and his voice.

Mike Lewis! Who? Mike Lewis!

Aside from any readers I have out of Houston, who got the song reference?

In all seriousness though, Mike Lewis is a name you’ll come to know quite well if you don’t already. We’ll start with the basics. Mike is a proud husband, father, veteran of the United States Army and Kentucky farmer. In 2012, he established Growing Warriors, the first veteran-oriented food security organization. 

There are about one million veterans and active duty military personnel receiving benefits from the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), more commonly referred to as food stamps. It’s also no secret that the unemployment rate among veterans is unacceptably high. (To be fair, it is declining at a considerable rate.)  Mike’s answer to this issue? Teach them how to grow and preserve their own food while banding together within their communities. This was accomplished by forming partnerships with cities, veteran hospitals, educational institutions, and community based organizations in order to provide veterans with hands on, curriculum-based learning opportunities. Since it’s inception, Growing Warriors has been able to help dozens of veteran families produce tens of thousands of pounds in organic produce.

Keep in mind that I’m just giving you a brief introduction. Mike’s, and the Growing Warriors’, efforts extend across multiple states and I could easily fill out the rest of this post by diving deep into everything they’re doing. For today, though, I want to bring your attention to what Mike and the Growing Warriors are doing for our industry, specifically the industrial hemp side of things.

Harvesting Liberty With Growing Warriors

If you haven’t seen it yet, check out this short documentary film, Harvesting Liberty. Backed and presented by Patagonia, this film aims to address and shed light on the legalization of industrial hemp in the United States. Seriously, stop reading this, open that link in another tab, take the next 12 minutes of your day to watch it, then come back here to finish up and talk to me about what you think.

A couple of years ago, President Obama signed the Agriculture Act of 2014 — the Farm Bill — into effect. There’s a section of this act titled Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research. Basically, this section allows for universities and state departments of agriculture — in states where hemp is legal to grow — to grow hemp for research or pilot programs. Back in the 1800’s, Kentucky dominated the industrial hemp market. So, it’s quite fitting that a group of Kentucky farmers, Mike and the Growing Warriors, were given permission to cultivate 5 acres. 

As soon as they got their seeds, Mike “threw ‘em the ground really quickly before anybody changed their mind.”

American Hemp Flag

I found two things to be really interesting while watching that documentary and doing further research afterward.

First, the way Mike and his team go about processing the harvested hemp into useable materials. Get this: it’s done entirely by hand. When you think about it, that actually makes sense. Industrial hemp hasn’t been cultivated in America since it was listed as a Schedule I controlled substance, so of course there’s no hemp processing machinery just laying around waiting to be used. Even if there was, Mike wanted to use traditional methods to weave what he had in store. More on that in a moment, though.

They begin by using a process known as retting. Put simply, retting is the natural process of allowing moisture and microorganisms to remove the sugars in the stalk that hold all the fibers together. Once the plant has been retted completely, it’s moved to the barn for drying. What follows is called breaking, or decorticating. The hemp stalk is run through a hand powered machine that crushes the stalk and separates each of the fibers. Once separated, the fibers are spun together using spinners that are, once again, hand powered.

The second thing that really caught my interest (and by that I mean it had me grinning from ear to ear) is what they decided to make with the materials that came from this first harvest.

An American Flag. (Not sorry if I’m spoiling anything because I told you to stop and watch the documentary!)

“We made this American ingenuity with people from all walks of life. Life and society are not uniform or standardized in any way. This flag represents the bumps and ridges in our society and the great things that happen when we accept differences and work to solve problems. It represents all of us and our future.”

Nationwide Legalization of Industrial Hemp

On the 4th of July, Mike delivered that flag to Congress along with a speech in support of the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015/2016. This act proposes the nationwide legalization of industrial hemp cultivation, something I’ll be digging into in a later article.

Mike takes a stance that you don’t see often in this industry and its activists. While he’s obviously in full support of legalization and bringing industrial hemp farming back to America, he also recognizes the need to take it slow. There’s a lot of mistakes left to be made and we need to let those kinks get worked out before attempting to blow up the market. Not only that, but there’s a ton of misinformation out there when it comes to hemp. Most of the public still doesn’t understand that hemp isn’t the same as its THC-laden counterpart cannabis.  

There’s a lot that can be said about Mike Lewis and all the work he’s putting out into the world. If I had to pick one thing, it would be that he’s solid proof that you don’t have to be a high tech startup out of San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, or Denver to effect real change on the cannabis industry. Those types of businesses have their place and I’m rooting for them. I just think it’s important that you don’t forget that there’s a place for you outside of an office space, if that’s where you’d rather be.

Interested in growing hemp or getting involved? You can learn more over at the National Hemp Association and the Hemp Industries Association.

CONTINUE READING…

New U.S. Agriculture policy could halt some Kentucky hemp growth

 

Image result for green remedy cbd

 

By Charles Mason, Bowling Green Daily News,

Possibly half of Kentucky’s nascent industrial hemp industry could be harmed by a policy suggestion offered by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Thomas Vilsack and other federal officials.

The policy suggestion is part of a larger discussion over the future of industrial hemp in America, which exists in legal limbo. States with legislation in place can allow it be grown under research conditions, but cannabis is still outlawed as a controlled substance.

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said Thursday that Kentucky is the biggest industrial hemp state in the United States.

“We want Kentucky to be the epicenter for industrial hemp,” Quarles said during a telephone interview.

This set of paragraphs in a federal publication has created some concerns about the future viability of Kentucky’s program.

“The term ‘industrial hemp’ includes the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part or derivative of such plant, including seeds of such plant, whether growing or not, that is used exclusively for industrial purposes (fiber and seed) with a tetrahydrocannabinols concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis,” according to the “Statement of Principles on Industrial Hemp” released Aug. 12 in the Federal Register.

Under the parameters, the feds would redefine industrial hemp to include only “historically proven” applications – fiber and seed – excluding other potential applications. The statement from the feds – which is not legally binding – goes on to say that ‘‘tetrahydrocannabinols includes all isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers of tetrahydrocannabinols.”

The Federal Register statement also noted, “… 2014 legalized the growing and cultivating of industrial hemp for research purposes in states where such growth and cultivation is legal under state law, notwithstanding existing federal statutes that would otherwise criminalize such conduct.”

The language in the Federal Register also has a Louisville businessman concerned.

Chad Wilson of Bowling Green, who has a business in Louisville, admits it is early in the process of these national discussions. He sees the Kentucky family farmer and his or her crop options being endangered by the federal policy suggestion.

Wilson is the marketing director for Green Remedy of Louisville, which distributes natural remedies derived from non-industrial hemp applications.

“We created this Kentucky company to help the Kentucky farmer,” Wilson said Thursday during a telephone interview. “We have a right to a better quality of life.”

Kentucky permits 167 research plots for industrial hemp by growers not affiliated with an educational institution and the about 2,200 acres planted is expected to grow in the coming years. Kentucky’s research pilot program is in its third growing season. The program exists because the current Farm Bill offers an exemption to allow the research plots, Quarles said.

“We are trying to create stability for the investors. They are concerned about this policy paper,” Quarles said of the state’s industrial hemp program.

Quarles recently wrote Vilsack and other federal officials to express concerns about the federal government’s approach to narrow Congress’ definition of industrial hemp.

That approach excludes cannabidiol (CBD), which advocates claim has health benefits. Green Remedy’s products derive from CBD.

Quarles said more than half of the industrial hemp acreage cultivated this year by pilot program participants in Kentucky is being used to harvest CBD.

“Freedom, flexibility and latitude to try new methods and applications are essential to the success of any agricultural research pilot program. Industrial hemp research pilot programs are now different,” Quarles wrote Vilsack; Deputy Assistant Administrator Louis Milione of the federal Drug Enforcement Agency; and Associate Commissioner Leslie Kux of the federal Food and Drug Administration on Sept. 12.

The Federal Register statement noted that the USDA, DEA and FDA were still sorting out legalities of permitted industrial hemp programs authorized by states.

The statement wasn’t all potential bad news for Kentucky.

Quarles applauded the decision to allow hemp growers and processors to be eligible for federal loans, grants and other programs.

However, he took exception with the narrowed definition that would shut out non-industrial hemp product applications such as use of hemp parts as food ingredients, as materials for artistic use; or as ingredients for pharmaceutical, nutraceutical or other health-related purposes.

Quarles told the federal administrator that CBD shows “great promise” as an economically viable agricultural product.

“Kentucky’s General Assembly is one of many state legislatures that has expressed their support for continuing and expanding CBD applications and research,” Quarles wrote.

The CBD portion of the plant is the backbone of Wilson’s three-year-old company. Wilson said he used to look at cannabis in the narrow view of marijuana and people getting high, but through personal education about industrial hemp and its non-industrial medicinal applications, “they call me the hemp preacher now,” he said Thursday in a telephone interview.

Green Remedy has less than five employees and Wilson declines to cite specifically what his business is worth except to say that he’s made a “substantial investment” and contracted growers to provide the CBD his business uses.

“This is an opportunity for the middle class to step up and start a business,” Wilson said. “You don’t do something like this and then pull the rug out.”

Wilson and Quarles are both concerned that foreign hemp seed might transcend domestic efforts.

The Statement of Principles calls for prohibiting transfers of hemp seeds and plants across state lines, despite Congress’ “clear intent” to allow such interstate transfers, Quarles noted in the letter.

“I cannot understand why the importation rules should be more restrictive for interstate transfers than for international transfers,” Quarles wrote.

CONTINUE READING…

 

RELATED:

Because CBDs are being investigated by drug companies, the FDA has granted CBDs status as being “investigated as a new drug.”

The man chosen by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration to run the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice is a retired Texas official who oversaw a 2008 raid on a polygamist sect, resulting in more than 400 children being seized by his agency.

 

Image result for Carey D. Cockerell retired Texas official

Kentucky Justice Secretary John Tilley announced that Carey D. Cockerell, the former head of family and child protection in Texas, has been named as the new commissioner for the state Department of Juvenile Justice.

 

 

LEXINGTON — The man chosen by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration to run the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice is a retired Texas official who oversaw a 2008 raid on a polygamist sect, resulting in more than 400 children being seized by his agency.

Carey D. Cockerell begins his new role next month, the Lexington Herald-Leader reported. The Justice and Public Safety Cabinet said Cockerell’s appointment “is part of an ongoing revamp to ensure the highest level of performance and accountability” at DJJ.

“Juvenile justice is undergoing a top-to-bottom transformation in Kentucky, and Mr. Cockerell brings the knowledge and expertise to shepherd reforms with transparency and accountability,” Kentucky Justice Secretary John Tilley said Friday in a statement. “We were impressed by his commitment to public safety and his compassion for our youth.”

Cockerell was commissioner of the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services from 2005 until he retired in 2008.

In March 2008, three months before his retirement, Cockerell’s agency seized 468 children during an overnight raid of the Yearning for Zion Ranch, a West Texas complex that was home to the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

The agency later said it had received a tip about physical and spiritual abuse at the ranch. However, the Texas Supreme Court ruled a month later that the agency had erred, improperly removing children from their families.

“On the record before us, removal of the children was not warranted,” the court ruled.

The state’s raid angered religious and civil-liberties groups and led to hearings by Texas lawmakers.

Mike Wynn, spokesman for Kentucky’s Justice Cabinet, said Cockerell would not be available for an interview Friday. The Bevin administration knew about the 2008 raid when it hired Cockerell, Wynn said.

“We’re aware of his background,” Wynn said. “We think that he has an exceptional record. He has a reputation for reform.”

Under Texas law, Cockerell’s agency did not need a court order to seize children from the ranch, Wynn said. The decision was upheld shortly after the raid in a hearing before a district judge. However, the Texas Court of Appeals and Supreme Court soon overruled that judge, finding that the state had “failed to meet its burden of proof” before it broke up hundreds of families, according to court records.

 

CONTINUE READING…

Geoff Young filed a civil lawsuit against the Kentucky Democratic Party, the Fayette County Democratic Party, and five powerful Democrats yesterday…

Media Release – For Immediate Release – August 20, 2016

 

 

Lexington, KY

Geoff Young, a Lexington politician who lost the Democratic primary for the U.S. House of Representatives in Kentucky’s 6th District to Rev. Nancy Jo Kemper on May 17, filed a civil lawsuit against the Kentucky Democratic Party, the Fayette County Democratic Party, and five powerful Democrats yesterday. His accusations include conspiracy to commit election fraud and the violation of his due process rights.
Young is also asking District Judge Gregory Van Tatenhove to freeze the assets of the state and county parties until his lawsuit is finally resolved.
The first page reads as follows, and the complete, 47-page civil complaint is available via the Dropbox link below.

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF KENTUCKY

GEOFFREY M. YOUNG, pro se, Plaintiff ] CASE NO. 3:16-CV-62-GFVT

454 Kimberly Place ]
Lexington, KY 40503 ] COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES
Phone: (859) 278-4966 ]
Email: energetic@windstream.net ] AND REQUEST FOR AN
]
v. ] EMERGENCY INJUNCTION;
]
SANNIE OVERLY, CLINT MORRIS, ] JURY TRIAL DEMANDED
]
ANDY BESHEAR, ALISON LUNDERGAN ] 1. Electoral fraud – sham elections
]
GRIMES, JACK CONWAY, THE STATE ] 2. Denial of due process – sham or no
]
CENTRAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ] procedures for resolving disputes
]
OF THE KENTUCKY DEMOCRATIC PARTY ] 3. Official misconduct in the first degree
]
AND THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF ] 4. Deprivation of honest services
]
THE FAYETTE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC ] 5. Violation of Executive ethics codes
]
PARTY, Defendants ] 6. Nullifying valid statutes
]
] 7. Intimidation by means of sanctions
]
] 8. Threats of physical force

Plaintiff alleges as follows:

JURISDICTION AND VENUE
1. Jurisdiction is conferred on this Court by Title 18, U.S.C. § 241, Conspiracy Against Rights; 18 U.S.C. § 242, Deprivation of Rights Under Color of Law; 18 U.S.C. § 245, Federally protected activities; and 18 U.S.C. § 1346, Deprivation of Right of Honest Services. Venue is proper in the Eastern District of Kentucky because all the Defendants reside or hold
COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES – Page 1 of 47
https://www.dropbox.com/s/1oowarjxlu85wdi/Complaint%20KDP%20Federal%20Denial%20due%20process%20Aug1916.doc?dl=0
For more details or an interview in any format, please contact:
Geoff Young
454 Kimberly Place
Lexington, KY 40503
Phone: (859) 278-4966
Email address:
energetic@windstream.net
Former campaign web site: young4ky.com

GEOFFREY YOUNG ON FACEBOOK

It’s time for another Presidential Election in the U.S.A. (Lord, what are we supposed to do now?)

The following is a short synopsis of the current situation as I see it concerning the Presidential Elections.

After watching Donald J. Trump at the Republican National Convention (RNC) and Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in July, I am still at a loss on who would be the best Candidate to put our Votes behind in the upcoming Presidential Elections. 

As of yet, the U.S. Marijuana Party as a group has likewise not decided who we should promote for the White House as well.

Bernie Sanders did his best at the DNC to push the Democrats over to Hillary Clinton, in his speech.  I am not sure how that is going to work out for them.

Hillary Clinton has had virtually continuous access to the White House since her Husband, Bill Clinton was elected President in 1993.  This is 2016 and I do not see anything that can be construed as positive changes for the American People in a long, long time.  You could argue that when “Bill” was in the White House things were different.  However, after gaining a few years wisdom on the matter, there are things that I could disagree with during his reign, that at the time I thought he was one of the best President’s we ever had.  And, sadly enough, he probably was.

William Jefferson “Bill” Clinton, American politician who was the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Clinton was previously Governor of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981 and 1983 to 1992, and the Arkansas Attorney General from 1977 to 1979. A member of the Democratic Party, ideologically Clinton was a New Democrat, and many of his policies reflected a centristThird Way” political philosophy.

The Omnibus Crime Bill, which Clinton signed into law in September 1994,[87] made many changes to U.S. crime and law enforcement legislation including the expansion of the death penalty to include crimes not resulting in death, such as running a large-scale drug enterprise. During Clinton’s re-election campaign he said, “My 1994 crime bill expanded the death penalty for drug kingpins, murderers of federal law enforcement officers, and nearly 60 additional categories of violent felons.”[88] It also included a subsection of assault weapons ban for a ten-year period.

Here are a few more items from the “Bill Clinton Era that are notable;

Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act (Brady Act) of 1993. When signed into law in November of that year, the Brady Act included a GCA amendment that created the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS).

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)

The Glass–Steagall separation of commercial and investment banking was in four sections of the 1933 Banking Act.

 

What I do not like about each of the Candidates:

 

7 of Hillary Clinton’s biggest accomplishments            

 Hilary Clinton – (Democrat) 

After having been in the public spotlight since Bill Clinton’s Election in 1992 and even prior to that in Arkansas, she has had plenty of time and plenty of access to all the most valuable areas in the Executive Branch of the Government and beyond to make change happen. 

Hillary’s own personal access to the White House includes the following:

She served as the 67th United States Secretary of State from 2009 to 2013, the junior United States Senator representing New York from 2001 to 2009, First Lady of the United States during the presidency of Bill Clinton from 1993 to 2001, and First Lady of Arkansas during his governorship from 1979 to 1981 and from 1983 to 1992.  Following the September 11 attacks, she voted to approve the war in Afghanistan. She also voted for the Iraq Resolution, which she later regretted.  She voted against the Bush tax cuts and in favor of the Patriot Act and TARP. Clinton responded to the Arab Spring, during which she advocated the U.S. military intervention in Libya.  

She served as the 67th United States Secretary of State from 2009 to 2013, the junior United States Senator representing New York from 2001 to 2009, First Lady of the United States during the presidency of Bill Clinton from 1993 to 2001, and First Lady of Arkansas during his governorship from 1979 to 1981 and from 1983 to 1992.  LINK to more information.

She arguably has the most experience and the most activism experience as well, in her background.  But there has just been so much drama in her past decisions and she has been in the circle for 25 years already.  You can definitely argue that it is time for change.  Period.

Image result for donald trump

Donald Trump – (Republican)

Corpocracy /ˌkɔrpɒkrəsi/ coined in 1995 by Nickolas Falvo, is a term used as an economic and political form of Oligarchy that is controlled by corporations, corporate interests, or the wealthy owners of corporations. It is different from both corporatism, which is the organisation of society into groups with common interests, and Corporatocracy, which is an economic and political system controlled by corporations or corporate interests while not being necessarily an Oligarchy.

Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is an American businessman, television personality, author, and politician. He is chairman of The Trump Organization, which is the principal holding company for his real estate ventures and other business interests. He is also the presumptive nominee of the Republican Party for President of the United States in the 2016 election.

Here are some quotes from Donald Trump’s opinion –

Millions are helped by Planned Parenthood, but defund it.

Cut defense budget, & entire EPA & Dept. of Education.

1989 full-page newspaper ads: “Bring Back the Death Penalty”.

Green energy is just an expensive feel-good for tree-huggers.

 

Additionally, here are a couple of reported facts;

Disposal of national public lands;

The Republican platform committee met this week to draft the document that defines the party’s official principles and policies. Along with provisions on pornography and LGBT “conversion therapy” is an amendment calling for the indiscriminate and immediate disposal of national public lands

“Congress shall immediately pass universal legislation providing a timely and orderly mechanism requiring the federal government to convey certain federally controlled public lands to the states,” reads the adopted language. “We call upon all national and state leaders and representatives to exert their utmost power and influence to urge the transfer of those lands identified.”

We as a People cannot let this happen on our watch!  It must be stopped!  National Public Lands are supposed to belong to the People of this Country.  If they are sold off to Private investors the land will be at their mercy. 

“…leaving national parks, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, and national forests apparently up for grabs and vulnerable to development, privatization, or transfer to state ownership.”

Cut spending by targeting the Department of Education and Environmental Protection Agency;

Asked on “Fox News Sunday” how he would cut spending, Trump named the Department of Education and the Environmental Protection Agency as potential targets.

Although I believe both “Departments” could use some restructuring I do not believe it is in anyone’s best interest, (except maybe the “Corporations”), to dispose of these Agencies.  They make an honest (?) attempt to regulate two of the most important “Departments” in the U.S.  Without them who would monitor the health of our environment or be responsible for our Children’s learning structure and environment?  While I would also say that private education is the best education and it would be nice if we could eradicate the Department of Education, it just does not seem viable to me to do so at this late date.  Our Children deserve to be educated to the best of the Student’s ability to learn.  Education should be free and equal to all Citizens as long as their participation in their education continues and passing grades are achieved.  This should include at least a basic four year College or University Curriculum. 

I do not claim to be all-knowing, but it sure seems like Trump’s Campaign is just another Corporate Coup to me!

Image result for gary johnson

Gary Johnson  (Libertarian)

no farm subsidies;

In my opinion, the Farmer’s are the very people that we should be subsidizing!  These are the very people who grow and produce our food!  The only reason for not subsidizing Farmer’s would be to let Corporate farming take over the market.  This may reduce the cost of food and maybe raise the quantity, but what quality of food would we be subjected to? 

Built private prisons to replace out-of-state prisoners;

There is only one reason to promote the use of private prisons and that is Corporate prisons.  Private prisons have been used for quite a few years and they have all been a failure.  Cost is not the only issue when it comes to housing our prisoners!  There are a lot of issues with private run prisons and there are a lot of links at KentuckyMarijuanaParty.Com to help you begin to sift through all those issues.  In short, I do not like them.

State primacy over water quantity & quality issues;

Water is our most important natural resource.  It is the lifeblood of the Human Race as a whole.  Water should be regulated first on a Federal level so as to ensure that all of the water which is utilized in our homes and for personal use, i.e., drinking and bathing is safe to use not only at the moment of consumption but so as not to cause health issues later.  I believe that Flint, Michigan is a very good example of what can happen when this resource is left untested – literally.

I am not a fan of the U.N. but it has “recognized the human right to water and sanitation and acknowledged that clean drinking water and sanitation are essential to the realization of all human rights.”  The U.S. should take this declaration seriously and strive fast and hard for the access to clean water to all Citizens in all areas of the U.S.  This should be a top priority!  Since clean, safe water is essential to all of us the Federal Government should set standards and do whatever is necessary to make sure all the States have equal access to whatever services they may require to make sure that this is accomplished.

NAFTA benefits New Mexico; jobs lost are those we don’t want;

Unlimited campaign contributions by corporations;

It is my opinion that only individuals should be able to contribute to any given campaign!  There should be no Corporate interests involved in any election!  We are talking about Government of the people, by the people and for the people, NOT the Corporations!  My belief is that a Corporation is not a ‘Being’ and should not be treated as such – It IS a business!  Businesses always have ulterior motives in any given Election – It is called Sales and Marketing strategy!

In a January 2001 interview with Playboy Magazine, Governor Johnson stated that he opposed campaign contribution limits. “The problem isn’t large contributions. The problem is that we don’t know who contributed. If you limit contributions from an individual to, say, $1000, then I think just the opposite occurs. Then you have politicians beholden to way too many people.” In 2010, Johnson said he favored unlimited contributions by corporations as well.

Gary Johnson on Social Security issues:  Raise the retirement age to 70 or 72;   A portion of Social Security ought to be privatized;  Reform all entitlements, including Social Security;  Open to personal accounts for Social Security;

 

Jill Stein –  (Green Party)

She wants to put much regulation into the ownership of guns which I see as a threat against an important part of our Constitutional Rights. 

“A Democracy is when two wolves
and a sheep take a vote on what’s
for dinner. A Republic is when the
sheep is well armed and can beg to
differ with the vote.

” Benjamin Franklin”

According to Jill Stein:

  • Gun ownership should be appropriately regulated.
  • Gun ownership should be appropriately regulated. 

She must have really strong feelings about this issue since it was inputted twice!

  • More local regulations; more background checks. 

Personally, I do not think we need any regulations in gun ownership.  At this point everyone needs to own one and know how to use it.  Regulations are not going to save your Ass when an intruder decides to do you harm.  The intruder will not read the rules and regulations, I promise you that much!

  • Reduce culture of violence via mental health & legal drugs. 

This is very troubling to me as an individual because forced health care, especially mental health care, is a very slippery slope which can and most likely will turn into a disaster for many patients.  Who gets to decide who needs mandated mental health care?  We already have too much of this type of scenario playing out in the Courts currently.  There is a BILL, H.R. 2646 which was passed out of Committee on June 15, 2016 deemed “Murphy’s Bill” which could very likely be the slippery slope that could lead into a very dire situation for any patient involved in the mental healthcare system. 

In my opinion, the best way to get mental help patients the care that they need is to make sure that Physicians and services are available with easy access.  If a patient feels good about the Physician that they are seeing and has ready access to those services it is a good bet that they will be open to receiving those services.  We cannot mandate healthcare.  If a patient has no right to choose whether or not he receives care then he has no right to determine who or where he receives the care from and what pharmaceutical drugs he may be mandated or forced to take!  This Bill could possibly be a big winner for the pharmaceutical industry as well as the drug testing industry!

History tends to repeat itself, so with that in mind take a look at this historical information and do not ever think that it could not happen here, because it damn sure could!

  • Address community violence with more mental health services.

Again, we cannot mandate mental healthcare!

  • Gun at home more likely to cause injury than to defend home.

This may or may not hold true but it is still a Constitutional right to own firearms and we have a right to protect ourselves, our families and our homes – as well as to help protect anyone within our reach.  It is an individual choice whether or not to keep a firearm in your home. 

With all this being said, it remains who would be the most trustworthy of the Candidates, let alone who would be the best leader of our Country.  Who can we trust the most to do what they say they will do?  Who would be most likely to lead us into a massive war?  Who would be most likely to take away even more of our individual rights through the guise of homeland security and gun control?  There are so many issues at the front of this upcoming Election.  I will continue to listen to the reports, and hopefully, come to a final decision soon,  but this will have to have been the hardest Election that I’ve ever had to make a decision on.

Smkrider

a state law called the Little TVA Act and EPB’s contract with the TVA mean that TVA ultimately regulates and approves all rates and rate structures for EPB.

Congressmen have not received AG letter concerning GEPB rates

  • BY MELINDA J. OVERSTREET moverstreet@glasgowdailytimes.com
  • Aug 11, 2016

EPB rate protestors at Rand Paul meeting

GLASGOW — Spokespersons for U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie and U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell said Thursday that their respective offices had not, to the best of their knowledge, received a letter from Kentucky’s attorney general regarding the Glasgow Electric Plant Board’s electricity rate structure.

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul was in Glasgow on Tuesday for an open meeting with constituents and heard about the letter from audience members. He said his office would serve as an advocate in the sense of connecting local residents to others in the federal government who could help.

A letter addressed to the trio in the commonwealth’s congressional delegation from Attorney General Andy Beshear was provided to some local residents last Friday and made its way to the Daily Times as well, but it had Monday’s date on it. It was unclear as to when it was actually mailed to the intended recipients.

EPB’s rate structure went into effect Jan. 1. It includes a customer charge for EPB’s cost of delivering the power it purchases wholesale from the Tennessee Valley Authority. For the power itself, EPB passes along its wholesale cost from TVA in like manner — with different rates for peak and off-peak hours, with relatively little difference between those two, and a coincident peak demand charge. The summer rate for the coincident peak — the one hour during each month when demand is the highest — is $11 per kilowatt, and it’s slightly less than that in the winter.

Although EPB uses weather forecasts to try to anticipate when that hour may be and issues alerts using multiple modes of communication, it’s impossible to know until the month is done which hour is the one that will bear that cost. Typically, a window of a few hours is provided if a possible CPD could occur on a particular day, but with recent weather patterns, that has happened on multiple days in a row. EPB has also suggested that consumers should just not use any unnecessary electricity during those hours and adjust their thermostats up approximately 4 degrees, but customers have complained that no matter what precautions they take, it still seems their bills jump considerably due to that one charge.

Beshear’s letter said the rate structure penalizes people who are unable to be flexible with their electricity consumption, such as elderly and disabled persons, and/or ones who can’t afford newer, more energy-efficient appliances.

“Most regulators and consumer advocates view residential demand charges as a blunt instrument, described as a ‘gotcha’ rate with unpleasant surprise impacts,” the letter says, noting that in most cases where such a rate structure has been incorporated, it has been only for large commercial/industrial customers.

The Office of the Attorney General’s Office of Rate Intervention has some regulatory authority over municipally owned utilities, but Beshear recognizes in the letter that a state law called the Little TVA Act and EPB’s contract with the TVA mean that TVA ultimately regulates and approves all rates and rate structures for EPB. The Office of Rate Intervention, upon the OAG’s receipt of numerous significant complaints from local customers, initiated a dialogue with TVA, a federal agency, to try to find a suitable resolution, but the letter asks McConnell, Paul and Guthrie to get involved as well.

“As the regulator, TVA is uniquely positioned to recommend and approve modifications to the rate schedule and help alleviate the unfair burden imposed upon the Glasgow residents,” Beshear’s letter says.

In the interim of the congressional delegation’s receiving the letter, Jim Hopson, manager of public relations for TVA, has responded to some of the specific concerns raised in the document.

He said last week that TVA would welcome a dialogue with federal, state and local officials.

“In our role as regulator, TVA works with local power companies to ensure power is provided to consumers in a nondiscriminatory manner at rates as low as feasible,” Hopson said. “We also have a responsibility to listen to the concerns of consumers as well as the officials and agencies who represent them. Electric bills affect everyone, from families to large businesses, and we care about all those who call the Valley home.”

He has noted, however, that it is not TVA’s role to tell local utilities how to design their rates, only to ensure that they use “industry standards” in calculating the bills and that they are fair and equitable.

The Daily Times asked whether any of the other 153 local power companies in a total of seven states to which TVA sells power use similar methods that are based on that one-hour peak demand.

“The rate structure GEPB implemented charges each customer his or her contribution to Glasgow’s peak demand, which is billed to GEPB by TVA,” Hopson responded. “Although this is unique among residential customers within the Valley, there are approximately 10 local power companies that have implemented this same structure for their large commercial and industrial customers.”

Although different classes of customers may be distinguished, such as residential and commercial, and even categories such as sizes of commercial businesses, once you have defined those classes, you can’t treat people within those classes differently, Hopson said.

Beshear’s letter says that, based on correspondence between TVA and EPB, TVA “had reservations about the rate structure prior to approving it.”

The Daily Times asked TVA: “If TVA had reservations before approving the rates, what specifically changed your minds that allowed EPB to proceed?”

Hopson replied that TVA had multiple discussions with EPB over several years prior to approval of EPB’s requested rate structure changes.

“A primary focus of those discussions was to ensure that GEPB accurately determined the costs associated with the new rate design and assessed how those costs would be passed on to consumers. TVA respects local decision-making regarding the timing and implementation of such changes,” Hopson said. “When TVA approved the proposal, the decision was based on conversations GEPB had with their community, their extensive multimedia and educational outreach program, inclusion of TVA’s requested changes and the fact the proposal fairly and equitably shared costs among all consumers.”

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Black market fentanyl use increasing in Kentucky

  • Deborah Highland
  • Aug 15, 2016

    ent3

    Fentanyl, an opioid painkiller 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine, was found in the toxicology screens of 420 people who died in Kentucky last year of drug overdoses.

    That’s a 247 percent increase from 2014, when 121 people who died of drug overdoses had fentanyl in their toxicology screens, according to numbers provided by Van Ingram, executive director for the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy.

    “We’re seeing a huge uptick in fentanyl in Kentucky,” Ingram said.

    Pharmaceutical fentanyl is used in hospitals during surgery and is also provided in pain patches to people with severe, chronic pain, such as a cancer patient. But unlike opioid pain pills that have been diverted to the black market for years, pharmaceutical fentanyl isn’t what street dealers or drug abusers are using, Ingram said.

    “We’re not seeing pharmaceutical fentanyl being diverted but instead it is being produced out of the country and being smuggled in,” Ingram said.

    The drug is being made in clandestine labs primarily in Mexico and China, he said.

    “We’ve not seen a lot of labs in the United States, although there have been a few. The real danger of fentanyl is it is so powerful that skin exposure or powder exposure through the mouth and nose can put law enforcement at great risk,” Ingram said.

    Recently, the DEA sent out a warning to law enforcement agencies urging officers not to conduct field testing on suspected fentanyl and to instead package it and send it off to a crime lab for testing, he said.

    Most often when police encounter fentanyl, it’s found in heroin or being sold as heroin. But with the availability of pill presses, some dealers are using fentanyl to make pills that look like real pharmaceutical products such as oxycodone.

    “If an individual buys pills off the street, there is really no assurance that what it says on the pill is really what they are getting because of the black market use of pill presses and other drugs,” Bowling Green-Warren County Drug Task Force Director Tommy Loving said. “By buying pills on the street, it could actually turn out to be a fatal error in judgment.”

    The DEA has seized pills all over the country that look like one drug but in reality contain illegally produced fentanyl, Ingram said.

    “It’s really scary stuff with people making their own opioids and shipping them across the country,” he said.

    “What we’re seeing is a lot of fentanyl analogs as well. It’s not the same chemical compound you would find in pharmaceutical fentanyl. You don’t know what you’re getting, or how powerful it is,” Ingram said.

    Narcotics investigators in Warren County haven’t seen much of the drug, Loving said.

    “But we’re very much aware of it, and it’s dangerous,” he said.

    “It’s much more potent than heroin and there are different versions of it being manufactured. … A little bit of this powder, if you come into contact with it on your fingers or skin or happen to breathe a little bit of it, can be fatal. And we are looking into obtaining Narcan for all of our detectives in part due to this danger that they may now be exposed to,” Loving said.

    Narcan is a drug that counteracts the effects of an opioid overdose.

    South Central Kentucky Drug Task Force Director Jacky Hunt already has Narcan for his investigators, who unknowingly encountered the drug last year during an undercover drug buy. Officers thought the purchase was of heroin.

    When Hunt received the lab testing results of the substance his agency bought, the drug turned out to be fentanyl instead.

    “My guys handled fentanyl and didn’t even know it,” Hunt said.

    The drug is most often seen with heroin in Kentucky or sold as heroin, Ingram said.

    Ingram’s office has written some grant requests to try to obtain Narcan for law enforcement in an attempt to save as many lives as possible, he said.

    — Follow Assistant City Editor Deborah Highland on Twitter at twitter.com/BGDNCrimebeat or visit bgdailynews.com.

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    Cannabis