Kentucky considering roadside driver drug tests

 Mike Wynn, @MikeWynn_CJ 11:54 p.m. EDT September 16, 2015


Above:  Schwendau, assistant director of Highway Safety Programs.

Right now, officials are only testing the kits for accuracy and reliability, administering them to volunteers after an arrest is complete. If they prove reliable, lawmakers say they will consider legislation next year to expand their use as a common part of police work.

Schwendau says police might soon use the swab kits in the same way they rely on roadside breath tests to identify drunken drivers, adding one more step to “remove that question of doubt” during a traffic stop.

Defense attorneys are more skeptical, warning that the tests could lead to invasive searches or give officers false pretense for arrests.

“They are chipping away at our rights — I just don’t know how else to put it,” said Larry “The DUI Guy” Forman, an attorney in Louisville who specializes in impaired driving cases.

Damon Preston, deputy public advocate at the Department of Public Advocacy, cautions that the courts still need to determine the reliability of the kits and what circumstances warrant their use in the field.

“The ease or simplicity of a sobriety test should never infringe upon the rights of persons to be free from unwarranted or invasive searches of their bodies,” he said.

The side of safety

The swabs don’t show a person’s level of impairment — only that drugs are present in their system. Supporters say Kentucky law would not allow them as evidence in court, and to build a case, police would still rely on the same process they currently use in investigations.

That typically involves a field sobriety test followed by an evaluation from a drug recognition expert, who is trained to monitor the suspect’s behavior and physical condition to determine their level of intoxication. Police also collect blood samples, which are much more conclusive.

Schwendau said the roadside tests could help police narrow down which drugs to test for in a blood sample. He said the kits already have proved successful in other states, particularity in California where authorities have upped the ante with digital devices precise enough to provide court evidence. That has saved the state money in the long run because more suspects are pleading out cases, he said.

On his website, Forman advises people to refuse field sobriety tests and breathalyzers to improve their chances of a successful defense in court. If swabs become commonplace in Kentucky, Forman says, drivers should refuse them as well.

One problem, he argues, could occur when people use drugs earlier in the day but are pulled over after the effects have worn off. He cited concerns that the swab could still test positive even though a driver is no longer under the influence.

Forman also questions how variations in temperature or allowing kits to sit in a hot police car for long periods might affect the results.

“It just gets really, really hairy, really fast,” he said.

But Schwendau points out that drivers who are not impaired will be vindicated in later tests. He also worries that while most people know it’s wrong to get behind the wheel drunk, many still think it’s OK to take an extra prescription pill before driving.

“We are doing it to save lives and get risks off the road,” he said. For police, “the best decision I think always is to err on the side of safety.”

Deadly risks

According to Kentucky State Police, authorities suspected that drugs were a factor in nearly 1,600 traffic collisions across the state last year, resulting in 939 injuries and 214 deaths.

In some areas struggling with epidemic drug abuse, high drivers are more common than drunken drivers, according to Van Ingram, head of the Office of Drug Control Policy. A lot of areas are having problems with drivers who are intoxicated on both drugs and alcohol, he said.

House Judiciary Chairman John Tilley, D-Hopkinsville, said lawmakers will want to look at the highway safety office’s pilot project before putting forth any legislation. Still, he reasons that the swabs also could help exclude drivers who might otherwise fall suspect because they swerved accidentally.

Officials have distributed 100 kits for the pilot tests, which they hope to wrap up in October.

Schwendau said he will bring the results to a state task force on impaired driving along with the Governor’s Executive Committee on Highway Safety.

Even if the kits are approved and adopted, police face a cost of $7 per unit.

Schwendau said local communities would have to choose whether to use them since the kits are too expensive for the state to provide. But departments could apply for federal grants, he said.

“It’s not our place to force it on them,” Schwendau said. “We just want to offer them a better tool.”

Reporter Mike Wynn can be reached at (502) 875-5136. Follow him on Twitter at @MikeWynn_CJ.


A summary of two doctors



is reeking havoc on many peoples lives including but not limited to the unfortunate souls who may find themselves in need of this medication.

After House Bill 1 was passed in Kentucky most of the Physicians who were prescribing these medications “duck and ran”.  It did not matter if you were on it for a legitimate reason or if you got it filled to “enjoy” or maybe even to “barter” with, you would no longer be “served”.

At first I thought it was only the people who smoked cannabis who were being targeted.  While it is true that “cannabis abusers” were a primary target, in fact it affected all patients who must use a narcotic for pain or anxiety issues.

An unnamed Psychiatrist told me that the law as it is written DOES NOT prevent him from prescribing the medication “xanax”, however, he chooses not to prescribe it to his patients.  It just has to be properly documented he told me.  Then I asked him if he had ever been investigated by the DEA and he said that he had not.  Maybe that is because he chooses not to prescribe narcotic medication?   There is much more money to be made off of prescribing the SSRI’s and they are handed out like orange juice at breakfast every day to millions of people, including children, even though there is documented evidence against it’s use.  But that is okay because “it isn’t a narcotic”…  Even so there is a severe withdrawal from the SSRI’s as well as there is “narcotics”.  Some are worse than others but any kind of psychological medication is going to make you dependent upon it, if it works at all. 

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (link is external)says that SSRI’s like Paxil and Prozac are no more effective in treating depression than a placebo pill.

I contacted another Doctor’s office for an appointment with an MD and before I could even tell the office clerk my name she asked me if I had ever been prescribed narcotic medications in the past or was I using them now?  When I asked her why she was asking me this she replied that if I was, the Doctor would not see me because “he already had several patients” in his practice that he prescribed for and he could not see anymore.


The whole theory behind any mental (narcotic) medication is to alter your state of mind.  Therefore, it must be a given that when you cut hundreds, even thousands off medication that they have been dependent upon to maintain some clarity in their life, that their mindset can become open to immediate and sometimes dangerous thoughts. 

A lot of these people are not privileged to have “Cannabis” available at all times to use as medication or for replacement.  They cannot afford to buy narcotics on the street and that being said there isn’t much there anymore. 

Heroin seems to be becoming the new mainstream “street drug”.  It is cheap, it gets you high, it will take away the pain or anxiety (for a moment at least) and you don’t have to depend on a Physician to prescribe it, a pharmacy to fill it, or the DEA to accuse you of Doctor shopping for it .  

The problem with that is that Heroin kills.   And it works pretty damn fast. 

Heroin surges as Kentucky cracks down on pain pills

Heroin deaths have climbed exponentially as pain pill addicts look for new high

SPECIAL REPORT BY LAURA UNGAR AND CHRIS KENNING | The Courier-Journal | Story by Laura Ungar

One could theorize that the passage of HB50 which included a provision to “provide funding for the purchase and administration of naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension”,   for Heroin overdoses was a calculated response to what they knew was going to happen when they discontinued “narcotics” at the Doctor’s office…more Heroin deaths.   Per the Interim Joint Committee on Judiciary on July 27, 2015…

Minutes of the 2nd Meeting of the 2015 Interim

July 27, 2015

The mandatory use of KASPER has resulted in three things: overall decreased prescribing of controlled substances, decreased inappropriate prescribing, and decreased “doctor shopping”. All three of these were goals of the bill, and all three have been successfully achieved. House Bill 217 was passed a year later, which cleaned up some parts of House Bill 1 and married the regulations to the statutory provisions. Representative Tilley asked members to note that those who are prescribing in high quantities are being monitored. Statistics have shown that since the passage of House Bill 1, heroin use increased. There has been an increase in heroin-related deaths.


However, HB50 has still not been passed and as of this day, HB50 still sits in the “House” where it has been since January 6th of this year I am assuming that no one has reaped the benefits of an emergency “administration of naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension”, as a component of substance abuse treatment programs”… and how many have died in the past year from Heroin? That is like putting the Cart before the Horse, isn’t it?  We have more people on Heroin than ever before and at the same time people who require “Scheduled medications” for treatment do not have access to them.  No Physician is going to risk their license being taken away just because you have pain or anxiety problems. 

Furthermore, KRS 218A.172 specifies :

Any person who violates the provisions of this section shall be guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.
Effective: June 24, 2015 History: Amended  2015  Ky.  Acts  ch.  33,  sec.  1,  effective  June  24,  2015.

In fact, the suppression of legally available narcotic drugs has done nothing more than aggravate an already out of control problem causing death when there was no reason to cause death. “First do no harm” is supposed to be the rule of the day…Well, it seems that idea just went to hell because they are now effectively creating a genocide of sorts. 

Does anyone out there think it may have been planned to happen this way? 

After being without medication for about four months now I am seeing where I was not addicted to it per say, I was dependent upon it because of my illnesses which I have been dealing with for over thirty years.  Since “quitting” my medication I have had continuing problems with acute anxiety on a daily basis, weight gain, loss of ability to physically maneuver as well i.e., walking and sitting causes a lot of pain and I find myself being able to walk shorter and shorter distances, RLS symptoms with inability to sleep normally which can cause too much sleeping or staying awake, constant worrying, more depressed, general disgust for the world at large.  I cannot afford “street drugs” even if I wanted them and I also cannot afford to maintain myself on Cannabis.  So where does that leave those  persons who are like myself?   I have been offered a list of “non scheduled” drugs, all of them I had tried before and had caused a problem and/or came with “Black Box Warnings“,  several of which I had been warned NOT to use by other Doctors.

At this point I am taking one day at a time, waiting on the “Kava” to arrive in the mail.  I do not see myself trusting my needs to any Physician’s RX pad again.  Doctor’s used to have a say in what they prescribed or didn’t prescribe to their patients.  One of those medications included Cannabis RX’s in various forms.  Everything now has to be CONTROLLED!  Especially us. 

And what better way to do it than to “monitor all of our doctor visits, our medications, impose urine testing and take away (for all practical purposes) the Doctor’s right to prescribe medication and our right to receive it, without intimidation at the same time they continue to push other drugs on us which are known for their ability to inflict death, mental disorders and pain and at the same time they are calling us drug addicts for needing medications?

Many good products which were sold OTC have been removed from the shelves of our pharmacy.  One of them was Quinine. 

From 1969 to 1992, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) received 157 reports of health problems related to quinine use, including 23 which had resulted in death. LINK.

Note that (only) 23 people died over a period of 30+ years from using Quinine before it was removed from the shelves.  How many people have died from SSRI’s?   What about Lipitor?

We have a new drug to try out that the FDA has approved (for now) for use to treat hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) – a condition characterized by low sexual desire.  This drug works by affecting the brain. 

By modulating serotonin and dopamine activity in certain parts of the brain, flibanserin may improve the balance between these neurotransmitter systems in the regulation of sexual response. 

I would suggest that you don’t get to where you ‘like’ it because we don’t know how long we will be allowed to use it!  Probably just long enough to create another baby boom – They need to produce some new slaves.  We are all worn out.

Informational Links

The exact cause of substance abuse is not clear, with theories including: a genetic disposition; learned from others – or a habit which if addiction develops, manifests as a chronic debilitating disease.

The Commonwealth’s Response to Kentucky’s Pill Mill Problem

Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting (KASPER) system

House Bill 1 Evaluation Study Results

Who may request a KASPER report?

Typical “Consent for treatment” with pain medications

[NASPER] builds upon the success of existing PDMPS [prescription drug monitoring programs] by encouraging the creation of and bolstering support for state-based, PDMPs through which schedule II, III or IV drugs could be tracked by state regulatory agencies. Through these secure, HIPAA-standard protected databases, physicians would have access to important information regarding their patient’s prescription drug histories. Of great importance, the bill’s interoperability requirements assure that the databases would, for the first time, make possible tracking across state lines by state entities. The availability to physicians of important patient drug information represents a significant step forward in improving patient care and reducing the abuse and misuse of pain-related controlled substances.”

President Bush’s endorsement of H.R. 1132/S. 518 followed less than a month later.

The U.S. House and Senate passed by voice vote H.R. 1132/S.518, the National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting (NASPER) Act of 2005. This legislation authorizes $60 million in new federal grants to assist states in creating new programs and expanding existing ones. Supposedly, this legislation is aimed at identifying prescription drug addiction, and treating the abuse. The bill originally was a physician-patient centered, public-health bill but now includes the expanded involvement of law enforcement. Sadly, it allows local, state, and federal agents direct use of this nationwide database of information on every prescription written for U.S. citizens and their pets.  If your dog is prescribed anything that is on the controlled substances list, your name, address, and phone will be entered into this monitoring program.

As of 2013, Manchikanti is the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians,  founded in Paducah Kentucky in 1998, as well as the Society of Interventional Pain Management Surgery Centers. He is also a member of the Kentucky Carrier Advisory Committee and the Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting Task Force, also known as KASPER.[16] He has also led the effort to establish the National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting (NASPER) Act, which is designed to help with the prescription drug abuse problem by having a central reporting system for doctors and pharmacists to keep track of these prescriptions. In 2005, NASPER was enacted into law, with almost all US states creating their own prescription drug monitoring programs.[17]

(The Controlled Substances Act-This law is a consolidation of numerous laws regulating the manufacture and distribution of narcotics, stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens, anabolic steroids, and chemicals used in the illicit production of controlled substances.)

The Commonwealth’s Response to Kentucky’s Pill Mill Problem

201 KAR 9:270. Professional standards for prescribing or dispensing Buprenorphine-Mono-Product or Buprenorphine-Combined-with-Naloxone

Finally, the rule contains very specific guidance by KBML relating to the use of urine drug testing in chronic pain management.

In the ordinary regulation setting the standards for prescribing controlled substances, 201 KAR 9:260, the Board requires that during the course of long-term prescribing or dispensing of controlled substances for the treatment of pain and related symptoms associated with a primary medical complaint, the physician shall utilize urine drug screens in a random manner at appropriate times to determine whether the patient is taking prescribed medications or taking illegal substances or medications not prescribed by the physician.

As usual you can follow the money…

The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) has selected Health Information Designs, LLC (HID) to develop a database that will collect and store prescribing and dispensing data for controlled substances in Schedules II, III, IV, and V and drugs of concern (tramadol).

In 1999 The Cabinet for Health and Family Services was given the challenge to establish Services was given the challenge to establish a program to fight the rising incidence of the diversion of legal prescription drugs into the diversion of legal prescription drugs into the illegal market.

US  congressman representing Kentucky’s 5th District secured federal funding to establish Operation UNITE—a nonprofit organization working to rid 32 Kentucky counties of illegal drug use through Unlawful Narcotics Investigations, Treatment and Education (UNITE)

I’m sure there is more on the money trail but I’m too damn tired to find it!


Opiate Users Needed for Research Studies (Lexington, KY)

Do you currently use drugs like Lortab, Percocet, Oxycontin, or heroin to get high?

Researchers at the University of Kentucky are conducting a study to examine the strength and effects of prescription opioids. You may be eligible to participate if you are between the ages of 18 and 50, you have taken opioid drugs intranasally (by snorting them), and you can stop using opioids without feeling sick. Participation will require a 5-6 week inpatient stay. Qualified volunteers will be paid for participation. All information is kept strictly confidential. For a confidential interview to see if you qualify, please call: 1-866-933-4UKY.


the last union mine in Kentucky has been shut down

By Dylan Lovan
The Associated Press

Posted Sep. 5, 2015 at 1:03 PM
Updated Sep 5, 2015 at 1:04 PM


In this 1939 photo, their day's work done, miners who reported for duty for the Harlan Central Coal Company near Harlan, Ky., leave the mine under the guard of troops who escorted them through a picket line.

HARLAN, Ky. — Kentucky coal miners bled and died to unionize. Their workplaces became war zones, and gun battles once punctuated union protests. In past decades, organizers have been beaten, stabbed and shot while seeking better pay and safer conditions deep underground.

But more recently the United Mine Workers in Kentucky have been in retreat, dwindling like the black seams of coal in the Appalachian mountains.

And now the last union mine in Kentucky has been shut down.

“A lot of people right now who don’t know what the (union) stands for is getting good wages and benefits because of the sacrifice that we made,” said Kenny Johnson, a retired union miner who was arrested during the Brookside strike in Harlan County in the 1970s. “Because when we went on those long strikes, it wasn’t because we wanted to be out of work.”

Hard-fought gains are taken for granted by younger workers who earn high wages now, leading the coal industry to argue that the union ultimately rendered itself obsolete. But union leaders and retirees counter that anti-union operators, tightening environmental regulations and a turbulent coal market hastened the union’s demise in Kentucky.

The union era’s death knell sounded in Kentucky on New Year’s Eve, when Patriot Coal announced the closing of its Highland Mine. The underground mine in western Kentucky employed about 400 hourly workers represented by the United Mine Workers of America.

For the first time in about a century, in the state that was home to the gun battles of “Bloody Harlan,” not a single working miner belongs to a union. That has left a bad taste in the mouths of retirees: men like Charles Dixon, who heard the sputter of machine gun fire and bullets piercing his trailer in Pike County during a long strike with the A.T. Massey Coal Company in 1984 and 1985.

“I had my house shot up during that strike,” said Dixon, the United Mine Workers local president at the time. “I was just laying in bed and next thing you know you hear a big AR-15 unloading on it. Coal miners had it tough buddy, they sure have.”

The shots fired at Dixon’s home recall the even deadlier organizing battles of the 1920s and ’30s, many in Harlan County.

One ambush shooting in 1937 ended with the death of union organizer Marshall Musick’s 14-year-old son, Bennett, when “a shower of bullets tore through the walls of the house,” according to union leader George Titler’s book, “Hell in Harlan.”

Organizing battles raged in Appalachia throughout the last century, most notably the 1921 Battle of Blair Mountain in West Virginia, where thousands of striking miners fought a shooting war with law enforcement and replacement workers, ending in dozens of deaths. One year earlier, 10 people had died in Matewan, West Virginia, in a skirmish over eviction notices served to miners who had joined the union.

In Harlan County, Kentucky, the 1931 Battle of Evarts ended in four deaths. More recently, the strife of the mid-1970s Brookside mining strike here was captured in the Academy Award-winning documentary, “Harlan County U.S.A.”

Johnson, who appeared in the film when he was 22 years old, returned this summer to the scene of his first picket line arrest along state Highway 38 in Harlan County.

He had stood there, near the Highsplint mine entrance, with other union members and gasped as state troopers set up a machine gun across the street. After about four hours of noisy picketing, a tall trooper stuck a baton between Johnson’s legs and raised it up to his groin.

“We just came to lend them a hand that day, and ended up going to jail,” said Johnson, now 63 and battling health issues.

Johnson, Dixon and union leaders worry that the union’s disappearance in Kentucky has opened the door for coal operators to lower worker standards.

“When the coal industry rebounds to the extent that it does, and non-union operators take a look around and see that there’s no union competition, and they’ll see that they can begin to cut wages, they can begin to cut benefits, they can begin to cut corners on safety, they’ll do that,” said Phil Smith, a national spokesman for the miner’s union.

Smith pointed to operations run by former Massey Energy chief Don Blankenship, who closed union mines in the 1980s and now faces criminal conspiracy charges in the 2010 deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia that killed 29 workers.

But industry leaders argue that higher wages and safer mines in recent decades have reduced the desire for workers at non-union mines to organize.

“Anymore, I just don’t think there’s that level of discontent between the company and working coal miners, which I think is a very good thing,” said Bill Bissett, president of the Kentucky Coal Association, an industry group. “If anything, they’ve won, which I think they’ve worked themselves out of a job, in that respect.”

Bissett said mines have become safer despite the union’s diminished presence in Kentucky.

“We’re in some of the safest time in the history of U.S. mining right now and a time when the UMWA is at their lowest level,” he said.

More vigorous federal enforcement and the closing of older Appalachian mines in a turbulent coal market have also contributed to declining injuries and deaths.

Union membership remains substantial in West Virginia, with more than 30,000 members, largely because that state wasn’t affected by the environmental regulations on high-sulfur coal that essentially halted mining in western Kentucky in the 1990s. Smith said those western Kentucky mine shutdowns led to the loss of about 20,000 union members in two years.

Patriot Coal cited the slumping market when it told workers the Highland Mine had to close.

“You could’ve heard a pin drop,” said mine worker Scottie Sizemore.

A safety officer at Highland for just a few months, Sizemore had left another coal job and his family behind in Harlan County, 300 miles away.

Union miners at the Highland mine were making about $24 an hour and working four 10-hour shifts a week. Workers at non-union mines typically work long shifts six days a week, and benefits vary from mine to mine. Sizemore, who was not in the union at Patriot, has since moved back to Harlan County to work for a smaller mining company. He took a hefty pay cut.

Wages were less of a priority than safety during the Brookside strike of the 1970s. Organizers were pushing the mine’s owner, Eastover Coal Company, to sign a contract establishing a United Mine Workers local there.

Returning to the scene of his arrest four decades ago, Kenny Johnson looked past a small bridge that leads to a mining operation. Coal is still being mined there today, just not by union miners.

Johnson recalled the hard lessons he took from that clash.

“I realized that day that it was very serious and that people would fight you, even to the point of having you put in jail for standing up for some of the ideals that coal miners hold dear,” he said.

As he spoke, a young, burly miner drove across the bridge, smudges of coal dust on his face. He angled his truck across, a few feet away from where Johnson was standing.

As he accelerated away, a cloud of dust kicked up behind him.


no jail for kim davis! “She has a very strong conscience and she’s just asking for a simple remedy, and that is, remove her name from the certificate…"

Kentucky Clerk Kim Davis Jailed After Refusing to Issue Marriage Licenses to Same-Sex Couples



Conviction of conscience is our right as U.S. Citizens in order to influence our Government into governing according to “our” beliefs, the beliefs of every American Citizen.  In this case, the issue is very divided among us. 

Although I believe in the right to marry for everyone, I also believe in living free and being able to assert “Freedom of Speech” and Religion in this Country.  As Americans we have the right to freedom of Religion, and religious liberty as well as “Freedom of Speech“.  However, per wiki, “legal systems, and society at large, recognize limits on the freedom of speech, particularly when freedom of speech conflicts with other values or rights.”

So there you have it in a nutshell.  The law which would apply in Kim Davis’ dilemma to try to force her into something she does not believe in, even though it was a known fact that she did not believe in “Gay Marriage” when she was “elected” by “the people” of Rowan County Kentucky.   The voter’s of Rowan County elected her based upon her personal and political beliefs at the time of her election.

Davis served as Rowan County chief deputy clerk, reporting to her mother, Jean W. Bailey, for 24 years.  

As shown below she won the general election with 3,909 votes.  The population was 6,845 at the time of the 2010 U.S. census

Where were all the voter’s at?  Only half of them have spoken.

Evidently the people of Rowan County wanted her to be in office because 3,909 people elected Kim Davis and now the “people” are complaining about how she Is doing her job. 

Rowan County 100% Reporting

Rowan County, Kentucky County Clerk Democratic primary, 2014:

Kim Davis

Elwood Caudill, Jr.

Charlotte Combess

Rowan County, Kentucky County Clerk general election, 2014

Kim Davis

John C. Cox


At the time of her election, Davis told the Morehead News,

“My words can never express the appreciation but I promise to each and every one that I will be the very best working clerk that I can be and will be a good steward of their tax dollars and follow the statutes of this office to the letter.”

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said the move would set a bad precedent.

“I think it’s absurd to put someone in jail for exercising their religious liberty,”

This case has attracted not only State and National but international news as well.  As an Activist, and after reviewing the Rowan County Kentucky issue surrounding the “Kim Davis” situation again,  in all conscience , I must take her side.  She was elected into the office at a time when gay marriage was illegal and still is according to the Kentucky Constitution.  She was elected in a conservative State in 2014. 

Decided on June 26, 2015 by a Federal case, Obergefell overturned Baker and requires all states to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples and to recognize same-sex marriages validly performed in other jurisdictions.  Obergefell v. Hodges, 576 U.S. ___ (2015).

Per the Rowan County website Kim Davis

“As county clerk I am responsible for providing many services to the people of Rowan county. These duties include general categories of clerical duties of the fiscal court: issuing and registering, recording and keeping various legal records, registering and purging voter rolls, and conducting election duties and tax duties.”

Embedded image permalink

Prior to her arrest, Kim Davis said the following on Thursday,         

“God’s moral law conflicts with my job duties,” Davis told the judge before she was taken away by a U.S. marshal. “You can’t be separated from something that’s in your heart and in your soul.”

After Rowan County clerk Kim Davis was taken into federal custody Thursday for repeatedly refusing to issue marriage licenses to gay couples, every deputy clerk but Davis’ son have said they would grant licenses.

Because she is an elected official, Davis, a Democrat, can’t be fired from the position for refusing to comply with the court order. If she is found guilty of misconduct, Davis could be imprisoned for up to a year, according to the Louisville Courier-Journal. The state legislature can also vote to impeach her, the paper noted, though that seems unlikely since most Kentucky voters oppose same-sex marriage.

There has been an honest and compliable offer to append the situation.  Per ABC news,

“Kim Davis thinks she has a solution to her problem.

The Kentucky county clerk, jailed for failing to follow a judge’s orders to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, wants her name removed from the marriage certificates, her attorney Matthew Staver told ABC News. “

On September 3, the Anti-Defamation League commented:

No one should ques­tion or chal­lenge Ms. Davis’s                           reli­gious beliefs.

It is therefore my opinion that because she was elected in a time when same sex marriage was illegal in Kentucky and there was no reason for her to believe at the time that same sex marriage would be legal in Kentucky during her reign as County Clerk,

…the fact that she is an elected County Clerk which was put into office by the people of Rowan County,

…That EVERYONE should have a right to express their religious beliefs and right to “Free Speech”,

…and that the no one should have to succumb to a Federal law which goes against their religious or free speech beliefs, or against their Constitutional rights as Citizens of this Country,

I believe that she should be freed immediately and her name REMOVED from the marriage license application in Rowan County Kentucky in order to preserve her personal rights as a Citizen.

As well this will ascertain the rights of the same sex couples to marry which is according to Federal law, yet also preserves HER right to believe otherwise.

As long as her name remains on the marriage licenses it is possible that those who have married under her name in Rowan County may not have a valid marriage license per the Federal Judge.

We need to protect our Constitutional rights as well as States rights, as well as conforming to Federal law.  This is how I agree that it can be accomplished without doing no harm to anyone involved.

It is interesting to note that the Kentucky Constitution defines Marriage as “one man” and “one woman” only.  

In the not so distant future, if we allow our State Constitutions to be preempted by Federal law, the State’s will loose all rights and become like “Counties” instead of “States”.  Are we going to cave in to the Federal Government and let that happen?

Kentucky is one of only four “Commonwealth States”.  This designation, which has no legal meaning, emphasizes that they have a “government based on the common consent of the people”

Is the Kentucky Commonwealth nothing more than a “nomenclature“?

Kentucky Constitutional Amendment 1[1] of 2004, is an amendment to the Kentucky Constitution that makes it unconstitutional for the state to recognize or perform same-sex marriages or civil unions.

The referendum was approved by 75% of the voters.

The voter’s have spoken.


Officials hope fiber will replace coal in eastern Kentucky

By ADAM BEAM Associated Press



In the 1970s, as the oil crisis spurred an increase in mining, Victor Justice taught people in eastern Kentucky how to mine coal.

Forty years later, his son is teaching them how to write code to build websites.

As the coal industry disappears across Appalachia, politicians and entrepreneurs have been trying to find something to replace it. On Monday, hundreds of people gathered in Hazard to hear one solution: A 3,400-mile network of fiber optic cables that state and private sector officials say will create one of the country’s fastest networks in one of the nation’s worst areas for access to high speed Internet service.

“We’re betting our future on the coming of this dark fiber,” Rusty Justice said of his company, Bit Source, which builds websites.

State and federal officials christened the network Monday, the product of about three years of negotiation that spanned political and geographic rivalries in a state that has plenty of each. The network will cost about $324 million to build. Taxpayers will pay about $53.5 million, with the rest coming from private investors. Kentucky will own the network, which will begin in eastern Kentucky but eventually reach into all of the state’s 120 counties. But the Australian-based investment firm Macquarie Group and its partners will build the network and operate it for the next 30 years.

On Monday, a packed auditorium watched as the CEO of a technology company demonstrated how he can build networks that can download video in less “five milliseconds.” And in an area that has a shortage of OB-GYNs, people watched a pregnant woman lay down on an exam table while a doctor in Lexington, about 100 miles away, gave her an ultrasound with telemedicine technology.

It’s the kind of benefits officials say the broadband network can bring to eastern Kentucky, which has suffered for years with little cellphone service and limited access to high-speed Internet.

“Broadband is not just about Facebook or HD Netflix,” said Jared Arnett, executive director of the Saving Our Appalachian Region, a group charged with transitioning eastern Kentucky’s economy. “This is about economic opportunity.”

Construction will begin this year and is scheduled to be finished by the middle of 2016 in eastern Kentucky. Other parts of the states will take longer to build. Republican U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers and Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear called it the most important infrastructure project in the state’s history, more so than the Interstate highway system. But they cautioned that the network will only help if people use it. The network is just a means for information to travel. Businesses, school districts, hospitals, local governments and others have to build the products that would make the network worthwhile.

Earlier this month, Beshear created a governing board to oversee the construction of the network. And his state finance cabinet has put together a fiber planning guide for local communities to use as they prepare for how to use the network.

“We know that broadband is not a silver bullet. There is none. But it levels the playing field. It gives us a chance,” Rogers said. “It takes away the historic barriers to better jobs: the difficult terrain, the isolation that we’ve endured these generations.”

Bit Source is based in Pikeville, the center of what was once the state’s largest coal producing county. It’s the same county where, 40 years ago, Rusty Justice’s father worked for the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program to train people how to operate heavy machinery and other skills needed in the coal industry.

Now Justice said he is seeing those same workers ask him for a job. Justice offered to hire 10 people, preferably out-of-work coal industry workers, and train them how to code. He got 974 applications. The company opened in March and, after 22 weeks of training, has been building websites for companies and local governments.

“We now have a small, embryonic tech sector alive and well in Pikeville,” he said.

Read more here:

Regarding kendra sams – "lodged" at laurel county corrections" in kentucky…


Ms. Kendra Sams,  29  years old, was being lodged at the Laurel County Corrections.

According to Facebook posts she suffered a seizure on July 12th which caused her to fall from the top bunk in her cell and land on the floor.  She was not given medical attention at that time.

At some point she was transferred to Casey County Corrections where her illness became acute.  Her Mother was apparently contacted and she was then transported to the Hospital.

Facebook Timeline Posts:

Roger Hoskins

August 18 at 12:18pm · Garrard, KY ·

I’m waking up to some heart breaking news out of the family and asking for all who can please pray

Roger Hoskins

August 18 at 3:10pm · Edited ·

Please be praying for Kendra Sams she’s going into surgery right now … This young lady didn’t deserve any of this and I’m confident that the story will be told soon…. Please now all the family ask is to be praying

Roger Hoskins added 2 new photos.

August 18 at 7:15pm · Garrard, KY ·

These picture are of Kendra Sams and this is not even the Justice this young lady has suffered .. She’s has much more going I inside her… And is in critical condition at UK hospital … She’s in bad shape according to family who is with her when I am updated on her condition I will pass it along .. The family ask for prayers and this should have never ever happen to anyone else

Roger Hoskins

August 18 at 7:49pm · Garrard, KY ·

Update on Kendra they have 3 drain tubes in her and not sure one will work right but already pulled 2 ounces of infection out of her back but keeping her sedated until tomorrow to do more test … No one is allowed to see her till tomorrow so please keep praying

Roger Hoskins

Yesterday at 3:36am · Garrard, KY ·

They have started a feeding tube on Kendra and a temp of 102 … Doctors said that the next 72 hour will be very critical… So keep prayers coming and I have had a lot ask what happened… Right now the families focus is on Kendra … All they need is prayers but I promise this story will be told .. Thank for all the praying that’s going on and as always it’s in Gods hands ..

Roger Hoskins

Yesterday at 1:37pm · Garrard, KY ·

The story is coming out …. Please pray for Kendra the doctors are hoping she last throughout the day

Roger Hoskins added 4 new photos.

Yesterday at 3:19pm · Edited ·

This all started at Lcdc and she was sent to Casey county jail with the out come being her fighting for her life …. On July 12th she had a seizure a few weeks later she was sent to Casey county detention center will little or no medicinal help … Her mother was called to come get her and this is now her daughter returned home to her …. Don’t know if she will see tomorrow… Please pray….

Roger Hoskins

17 hrs · Edited ·

So thankful for Facebook this night as my post for Kendra has brought some light on all this but most of all I wanna thank the people who are brave and step up in behalf of Kendra … That is why Facebook is a valuable tool … As of 2 am there is no changes in her … I wanna thank each person who has shared this and by all means please continue to do so … This family deserves answers ! This could be your family member……………I will not disclose their name but here is a tid bit of information ……………..

My sister was in the cell with this girl in Casey co jail! She needed medical attention from day 1 this could be anyone’s family member please share this lets raise awareness

Michelle Jackson

11 hrs ·

Update on Kendra!!!!!!
She is still in critical condition they are having trouble keeping her BP up still and now they’re having to give her blood (1pint) so far… Please keep prayers coming.. TIA

— with Roger Hoskins and 8 others at UK ICU.

Michelle Jackson

3 hrs ·


— with Roger Hoskins and 9 others at UK ICU.

Michelle Jackson's photo.

Roger Hoskins

2 hrs ·

Please keep sharing my post maybe someone seen something and will step forward for Kendra Sams … This needs media attention to get to the bottom of this

Roger Hoskins

6 hrs · Edited ·

The family knows she is not perfect but to see this after being in 2 jails and her mother was called to come get her only to go into uk hospital is sad this is Kendra Sams if anyone was in her cell with her in laurel or Casey county please get ahold of this family … We are looking for answers to what happened .. This is truly sad … We have tried to contact all media but no help as yet so family has no choice but turn to social media .. Any information is appreciated …please share


It is currently 8/20/15 at 10:30pm and I am awaiting a call from Roger Hoskins who is willing to fill in the gaps in this atrocity which has happened under the watch of  “Kentucky Corrections “.

We can only hope and pray that Kendra Sams receives the justice that the State of Kentucky owes her because of this horrific ordeal.  She is not out of ICU yet.   She is currently still fighting for her life.

It never should have happened. 

ANYONE who is incarcerated is entitled to receive healthcare under the Justice Department.

For some in the South, defying medical marijuana laws is the Lord’s work

By Quint Forgey, News21 August 19 at 6:30 AM

Image result for For some in the South, defying medical marijuana laws is the Lord’s work

Editor’s note: This is one in a series of articles on the legalization of marijuana, produced in partnership with the 2015 Carnegie-Knight News21 national student reporting project.

CHESTER, S.C. — She lives in the wooden house her grandfather built more than a century ago in Chester, S.C., a rural community about a two-hour drive southeast of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

The cluttered home is dimly lit and not air-conditioned, with the low hum of floor fans filling in rare lulls in conversation. Two chihuahuas, Cricket and Joe, scuttle around Ada Jones’s feet as she peers down through her eyeglasses at the iPad in her hands.

The tablet looks conspicuously out of place among the black-and-white photos hanging on the walls and the dangling, beaded divider into the next room. It serves as her connection to the outside world, as well as the outside world’s connection to Jones.

If someone needs medical marijuana, they contact her over the Internet.

Jones encourages those who reach out to her to purchase marijuana illegally and make their own cannabis oil. If they’re unsuccessful, she puts them in contact with a supplier who can sell them a more refined product.

“It’s almost like playing God,” Jones said. “If somebody contacts me, I have to look at them and wonder. I wonder if that’s police first, not if I can help their kid. I try not to do that, but you have to because you’re scared.”

Jones helps everyone she can, whether they be young mothers of epileptic children or older patients suffering from chronic pain. Her specific brand of civil disobedience, like so many other facets of Southern life, is captained by her faith.

“They talk about the South being the Bible belt, and praise the Lord we are,” Jones said. “I cannot not help somebody. I have to. As a Christian, that’s what I’m here for.”

Many Southern states have a long and failed history with medical marijuana, mired deep in forgotten statutes and a lost generation of patients. Only recently, as the marijuana movement sweeps through statehouses, have those laws become political tinder for a new debate in the Old South.


2015 Federal Funding Law is a Win for Kentucky

“$175, 465 million for National Guard Counter-Drug Operations, including support for the Kentucky National Guard to eradicate marijuana from the Daniel Boone National Forest. The Kentucky State Police reported nearly a half million plants were eradicated in Kentucky last year.”


Press Releases

2015 Federal Funding Law is a Win for Kentucky

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Washington, D.C. , Dec 17, 2014 | Danielle Smoot (606-679-8346) | 0 comments

U.S. Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05) praised members of the U.S. Congress for passing the consolidated federal funding bill for fiscal year 2015, to avoid a government shutdown, rein in government overreach, and fund most government agencies through September 30, 2015. As Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, Rogers worked tirelessly to ensure the legislation was a win for Kentucky. President Obama signed the Omnibus bill into law on Tuesday, December 16.

“This law includes funding for important programs that are priorities for communities in southern and eastern Kentucky,” said Rogers. “For example, the legislation provides specific economic development assistance for coal mining communities, funds much-needed rural housing loans, and supports a number of initiatives to fight the epidemic of prescription drug abuse. It also decreases the backlog of military veterans’ claims and reins in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Let me be clear: this law does not include any new funding for the President’s Executive Amnesty plan. We will address his amnesty plan with the new Congress in 2015.”
Additional items to note in the law that will benefit Southern and Eastern Kentuckians:

Drug Abuse
The legislation supports a holistic, multifaceted approach to the scourge of prescription drug abuse, including funding for our federal law enforcement officers on the front lines, critical drug abuse treatment programs, and educational efforts to help states implement model drug laws that reduce diversion and abuse.
$20 million is provided for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to partner with the states hardest hit by the prescription drug epidemic in developing and implementing strategies to combat addictions and abuse.
It includes the following funding for treatment, law enforcement, education and other drug-related issues: 


  • $91 million for Drug Courts, plus an additional $1.4 million for technical training for the judges who administer these important courts
  • $5 million for Veterans Treatment Courts to meet the unique needs of those who have bravely served in the U.S. Armed Forces

Law Enforcement

  • $367 million for DEA’s diversion control program, with encouragement to intensify support for its Distributor Initiative
  • $7 million for an anti-meth task force, plus $7 million to help state and local law enforcement agencies clean up meth labs
  • $7 million for an anti-heroin task force
  • $175, 465 million for National Guard Counter-Drug Operations, including support for the Kentucky National Guard to eradicate marijuana from the Daniel Boone National Forest. The Kentucky State Police reported nearly a half million plants were eradicated in Kentucky last year.
  • $245 million for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA). The Appalachian HIDTA, covering parts of Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia, has been a national leader in the fight against prescription drug abuse. In partnership with Operation UNITE, AHIDTA recently launched a pilot voluntary program in southern and eastern Kentucky to distribute free oral drug testing kits for parents who suspect their children are abusing drugs at home.


  • $1.25 million to help states develop and implement legislation to reduce drug abuse. 

The legislation includes a number of other provisions aimed at spurring federal action to reduce the abuse and misuse of prescription drugs. For example, the legislation: 

  • expresses opposition to the approval of the powerful painkiller, Zohydro, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and requires the agency to report to Congress on its ability to track usage of the drug once it is on the market,
  • encourages the FDA to finalize guidance on Abuse Deterrent Formulations in order to incentivize innovation in this emerging field for manufacturing prescription narcotics, and
  • encourages the Department of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities to participate in the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) prescription drug take-back program. 

The legislation demonstrates the Congress’ commitment to reining in the EPA and beating back the Administration’s devastating anti-coal policies. 

  • It cuts EPA funding by $60 million below the 2014 level, causing the agency to reduce its staffing to the lowest level since 1989.
  • The Obama Administration is prevented from moving forward with a policy that would preclude U.S. investments in coal-fired generation plants overseas. By putting a halt to this regulation, the legislation ensures that U.S. coal will have a vibrant market in emerging economies around the world.
  • It prevents the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers from changing the definition of “fill material,” which would be harmful to several U.S. industries, including the coal mining industry.
  • The bill rejects a proposal from President Obama to spend $66 million on new or expanded job-killing regulatory programs at the EPA.
  • $571 million is included for Fossil Energy Research to ensure that the U.S. is developing in the necessary technology to maintain coal as a part of its energy portfolio for the long term.
  • It directs the EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers to submit monthly status reports on any Section 404 mining permit applications under review. These monthly reports will allow the House Appropriations Committee to oversee how many mining permit applications have been submitted, the number of days under review, and whether they are being approved.
  • The law maintains Office of Surface Mining State regulatory grants at $68 million to allow states to implement programs without increasing fees on the mining industry. It also rejects the President’s proposal to hire more Federal regulators to increase Federal oversight inspections of State programs.
  • The law prevents the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers from regulating certain agricultural areas, including farm ponds and irrigation ditches, under the Clean Water Act.

Economic and Community Development
The legislation includes funding for a number of federal programs that support the efforts of southern and eastern Kentucky communities to create new opportunities through access to pre-school and post-secondary education, access to low-income housing opportunities, and supports grants for important programs in the region. It includes:
Support for Economic Development

  • $10 million for the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) to develop a comprehensive strategy to assist coal mining communities
  • $90 million for the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), including $10 million for broadband development in distressed Central Appalachian counties
  • $2.5 million for the Small Business Administration (SBA) to make micro-loans in small and rural communities to create new job opportunities
  • $230 million to help Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) build their capacity to serve low-income individuals and communities that otherwise lack access to affordable financial products and services
  • $3 million for the HubZone Program, which helps small businesses in rural communities gain preferential access to federal procurement opportunities
  • $3.4 billion for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) to keep families safe and healthy through initiatives supporting energy assistance
  • $674 million for Community Services Block Grants, which help the region’s Community Action Agencies further their mission to provide critical services
  • $372 million for Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT), a program that provides funds to local governments to help offset losses in property taxes due to nontaxable federal lands within their jurisdictions
  • $12.7 million for a competitive grant program to provide technical assistance for improved water quality or safe drinking water in rural communities

Support for Rural Housing

  • $900 million for Section 502 Direct Loans, which helps low-income individuals or households purchase homes in rural areas
  • $27.5 million for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Section 523 Self-Home program, which helps very low-income families construct their own affordable homes
  • $900 million for the HOME program, which provides formula grants to states and localities that can be used to build, buy and/or rehabilitate affordable housing for rent or home ownership or provide direct rental assistance to low-income people
  • A flat-rent provision was also included, allowing local market factors to be considered when flat-rent rates are determined. This will keep rental rates low for many of Kentucky’s Fifth District Residents.

Support for Education Programs    

  • $839 million for TRIO programs, which serves and assists low-income individuals and first-generation college students as they progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to college.
  • $301 million for Gear Up Programs, which are designed to increase the number of low-income students who are prepared to enter and succeed in post-secondary education. 
  • $8.5 billion for Head Start, which provides comprehensive early childhood education, health, nutrition, and parent involvement services to low-income families.
  • The law reinstates student aid eligibility for students enrolled in career pathways programs.
  • It provides an opportunity for laid off coal miners and other individuals that do not have a high school diploma or the equivalent to receive federal financial aid, if enrolled in an eligible career pathways program.


    • Directs the DoD and VA to develop an interoperable health records management system, allowing agencies within each Department to be able to communicate regarding patient services and records. 
    • Funds VA medical services at $45.2 billion, including funding for mental health services, suicide prevention and treatment for homeless veterans
    • Includes $2.5 billion for processing the disability claims backlog at the VA
    • Provides $5 million to the VA Office of the Inspector General for the purpose of addressing the VA “wait list” scandal and continue auditing the VA hospital appointment scheduling process and lapses in patient care

    Rogers has served Kentucky’s 5th Congressional District since 1981. With a focus on economic development, job creation, fighting illegal drugs and preserving Appalachia’s natural treasures, he has a reputation for listening to his constituents and fighting for the region he represents. For more information, visit or follow Rogers on Twitter @RepHalRogers or on Facebook @CongressmanHalRogers.  


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    Tags: Homeland Security and National Defense, Education, Illegal Drugs, Economic Development and Job Creation, Wayne County, McCreary County, Pulaski County, Whitley County, Laurel County, Rockcastle County, Knox County, Jackson County, Bell County, Clay County, Harlan County, Leslie County, Owsley County, Lee County, Breathitt County, Perry County , Wolfe County, Knott County, Letcher County, Menifee County, Morgan County, Magoffin County, Floyd County, Rowan County, Lawrence County, Martin County, Pike County, Johnson County, Bath County, Veterans, Boyd County, Carter County, Elliott County, Lincoln County


    drew curtis (Independent) for governor has said he would sign into law a measure allowing the use of recreational marijuana in the state of Kentucky if the legislature approved it.

    By Jack Brammer

    jbrammer@herald-leader.comAugust 10, 2015

    FRANKFORT — Digital entrepreneur Drew Curtis and his wife, Heather Curtis, paid $500 and submitted more than 9,000 signatures Monday morning to enter the race for Kentucky governor and lieutenant governor as independents.

    The secretary of state’s office said a few hours later that the husband-and-wife team from Versailles had submitted at least 5,000 valid signatures of registered Kentucky voters, as required by law, and therefore would appear on the Nov. 3 ballot.

    The major party names on the ballot are Democrat Jack Conway and running mate Sannie Overly, and Republican Matt Bevin and running mate Jenean Hampton.

    Tuesday is the deadline for independent candidates to enter the race.

    Drew and Heather Curtis, both 42, are not the first married couple to run for the state’s two highest elective offices. Steven Maynard and his wife, Bonnie, of Inez ran for governor and lieutenant governor in the 1995 Democratic primary. Paul Patton won the nomination.

    The Conway campaign said it had nothing to say about the Curtis campaign. The Bevin campaign did not respond to a request for comment.

    Speaking at a news conference in front of the Capitol, Drew Curtis said he and his wife were citizen candidates, not politicians.

    Curtis said he didn’t know from which political party he would draw more votes, but he predicted he would win the race and not be a spoiler. He was a Democrat before changing to an independent last year.

    Curtis said that Conway has yet to say no to any question that begins with “would you fund this?” and that Bevin can’t remember his policy positions “20 minutes after he says them.”

    As governor, Curtis said, he would consult with his friends in Silicon Valley and try to use his digital entrepreneurship background to bring broadband Internet access to all parts of Kentucky.

    Curtis is founder of, a news aggregation website. He described it as a combination of The Daily Show and the Drudge Report.

    He said he would “use a lot of social media” to win the race and would not accept campaign contributions from special interests.

    To participate in some of the upcoming debates, Curtis said, he would need to attract at least 10 percent of the vote in public polling. In a recent Bluegrass Poll, Curtis stood at 8 percent.

    On issues, Curtis said he thought the state has enough money to continue funding an expanded Medicaid program in 2017, but he wasn’t sure about 2020.

    He said he would sign into law a measure allowing the use of recreational marijuana in the state if the legislature approved it.

    He also said county clerks should “do their job” and issue marriage licenses to all qualifying couples.

    Curtis said he voted for Democrat Barack Obama for president in 2008 but had forgotten his presidential preference in 2012.

    Of this year’s down-ticket candidates for other state constitutional offices, he said he liked lieutenant governor candidate Hampton, saying they had talked about popular fictional characters “Batman” and The Walking Dead.

    Curtis declined to be pegged as a liberal or conservative, calling himself “an ultra-pragmatist.”

    He said he chose his wife to be his running mate because they have operated a company together for 16 years and make “a great team.”

    Heather Curtis said her husband was “brilliant” and that “he moves mountains.”

    Heather Curtis acknowledged that she first said no when her husband told her he would like to run for governor and wanted her to be his running mate.

    Curtis’ campaign manager is Andrew Sowders. His campaign communications director is Heather Chapman.

    Jack Brammer: (859) 231-1302. Twitter: @BGPolitics. Blog:

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