(KY) Please Call Your Legislators!

ky 2019

To ALL Kentucky Citizens,

The time is now to contact your Legislators concerning the Cannabis Bills, and any other Bills which you are concerned about!  The phone number to call is:

1-800-372-7181

Here are the current Cannabis Bills:

SB 80 / Dan Malano Seum / Establishes the “Department of Cannabis Control” which will oversee lawful consumption of Cannabis in Kentucky by adults 21 and over.

HB 136 / Establishes a very strict “Medical Cannabis” bill for bonified Patients.

SB 83 / Perry B. Clark “Shauna’s Law”  Relating to a drug free workplace / Seeks to mandate an appeals process for those employer’s who enforce drug-testing upon their employee’s which will address those persons who have been found in violation of the drug-free workplace policy by testing positive on random drug screens for legal Hemp products such as CBD. It would set aside that violation if proven that a legal product had been used.

SB 82 / J. Higdon / to make the penalty for possession of a personal use quantity of marijuana a prepayable non-criminal fine;

SB 57 / J. Higdon / to allow discretionary expungement of Class D felonies with a ten-year waiting period;

legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2019/01/13/kentucky-will-march-to-the-capital-once-again/

Kentucky Will March To The Capital, Once Again…

gatewood rainbow farm

Rainbow Farm was located in Vandalia, Michigan & was a cannabis friendly community. They had great concerts & speakers. The government came in later & killed the owners & stole the farm from the legal birth right of the son, Robert, 1 week before 9-11 (September 3rd & 4th,2001). Tom Crosslin & Rollie Rolhm were the owners & each one of them were systematically gunned down & tortured after being out numbered 300 to 1. In order to stop a memorial day concert, that was to start a signature campaign to legalize cannabis in the state of Michigan.

                                          ——————————–

1/13/2019

ShereeKrider

The Country as a whole has come a long way since the incident above in 2001, but it still has a very long way to go.  We have 11 “legalized States” and 33 “medicinal States” to date according to NORML.  More than the majority of Americans believe it should be made “lawful”.  Many sick people including children are suffering needlessly and we have the ability to help rectify the situation.

We should not still have to be going to the Capital in Frankfort to beg for something that we should have had in Kentucky more than seven years ago.  In fact, it never should have been “unlawful” to possess in the first place.

Gatewood Galbraith, “The greatest Governor that Kentucky never had”, spoke to this issue many times and had he been elected we would not still be in this same fight today.  He said, “You have got to get political.  Because if you don’t get political then I’m gonna die in the streets!” 

The number of people who are dying in the streets has exponentially increased in the past 5+ years in earnest.  The crisis was started by the Government and their Pharmaceutical cronies who promoted highly addictive opioid drugs for daily use to patients who were suffering and  they bit the bait.  After everyone was sufficiently addicted to the pharmaceuticals the Government claimed an “opioid crisis” and immediately withdrew these needed medications by way of intimidating the Physicians and forced drug testing to the point that the Medical Establishment could no longer take the chance of losing their Practice’s, and so they immediately withdrew needed medicines from Patients who legitimately needed them, as well as other’s who had become addicted for other reasons – and there are many reasons…  This in turn caused people to literally die in the streets due to a dire need to medicate and the ample supply in the streets of much more potent and deadly drugs than what the Physicians had been prescribing them to begin with.

Some of us were strong enough and smart enough to turn to Cannabis which saved our lives, even though it is illegal.  A lot of us have lost close friends and family members to this ‘war on drugs’.  Many of us grieve daily because of it.

There have been Senators, Representatives and Citizen Activists, working hard to see Cannabis regulation and lawfulness is passed in the very State that in WWII the Government pleaded with people to grow Hemp for their War efforts.  The people responded to their requests in a time of need.  However, the Government turns their heads the other way when the Citizens request that they help them establish a safe and lawful way to use Cannabis, medically and otherwise.  Not only would this help the multitudes of patients who direly need this medication, it would also establish a lawful product that can be taxed and used for the greater good of the State we reside in, including new businesses and employment.  As a result, even those who chose not to partake in Cannabis would benefit from the legalization and taxation of the  product – much like alcohol – with much less lawlessness than alcohol promotes…

It would establish a lawful alternative to Alcohol and Tobacco and other illicit drugs, such as street level opioids which are destroying families and responsible for unending deaths even as we speak.  Yet, to date, our Kentucky Government has refused to act upon this issue. 

Why has Kentucky Government taken such a path in governing of the people?

“Petrochemical-Pharmaceutical-Military-Industrial-Transnational-Corporate-Fascist-Elite-Bastards”  LINK

For a more in-depth read on why and how our Country has fell into the hands of the NWO you can view this LINK.  “The Elkhorn Manifesto” is an archived page of the Kentucky Marijuana Party, written in 1996 by R. William Davis, and collaborated with Gatewood Galbraith. 

Here we are, once again, in the year of Our Lord, 2019, begging for our leaders to hear our plea’s.  And once again, they will try to ignore us! 

As far as I am concerned, the lawfulness of Cannabis should first have been rightfully returned to the people through REPEAL of Federal Treaties and Statutes which made it unlawful to begin with.  Possibly as far back as the 1914 Harrison Narcotics Tax Act.  However, the situation has been taken into the hands of the individual States and their “States Rights” because the Federal Government refused to stand up for the rights of our people.  Instead they have enlisted a “New World Order” to do their dirty work which seeks to contain society at large – world wide control of the masses, control of all plants, food, medicines,  WATER, etc., to be placed under strict guidelines to which we must abide by the rules or suffer the consequences.

We have become damned if we do submit to the law and damned if we do not follow it as well. 

There is  research already out there and patients are being helped and in some cases literally saved from an early death by using Cannabis.  Many people have been saved from addiction by using Cannabis. 

We cannot wait another year to change the Cannabis Statutes in Kentucky.  We need it now.  We needed it 20 years ago.

There are currently two Bills in Kentucky Legislature – one in Senate and one in the House.  Both bills should be passed and this is my reasoning for this:

SB 80 / Dan Malano Seum / Establishes the “Department of Cannabis Control” which will oversee lawful consumption of Cannabis in Kentucky by adults 21 and over.  This Bill gives limited and controlled freedom back to the people in that it does allow for growing on our own property and consumption as well as sets the stage for business to be lawful throughout Kentucky.  This legislation could be enacted fairly quickly and jumpstart the economy here.  It is imperative that we implement this legislation this year if we seek to make our State livable again.

HB 136 / Establishes a very strict “Medical Cannabis” bill for bonified Patients.  Because of the nature of illnesses and the fact that many Children could be served by this Bill it is imperative that “medicinal Cannabis” be made available in Kentucky to those who are in need, medically, whether they be adult or child.  Many people who are not familiar with Cannabis and it’s use would serve to be protected as patients by this medical legislation.  The problem is that with the measures necessary to comply with the Bill as it is written it would most certainly be a slow process to set up across the State and reach all patients equally.   However, we should proceed immediately on this Act as well.

Additionally, a drug-free workplace Bill for the use of legal Hemp CBD products, currently sold on the open market:

SB 83 / Perry B. Clark “Shauna’s Law”  Relating to a drug free workplace / Seeks to mandate an appeals process for those employer’s who enforce drug-testing upon their employee’s which will address those persons who have been found in violation of the drug-free workplace policy by testing positive on random drug screens for legal Hemp products such as CBD.  It would set aside that violation if proven that a legal product had been used.  This Bill must be passed in order to preserve the integrity of the Hemp market as well as employee’s rights.

IF our Legislator’s  and Governor do not seek to enact the Bill’s which we as a People have requested  for our health and well-being in general, then the political system of the Commonwealth of Kentucky needs to be immediately and completely changed and replaced.  This would also include other issues of great importance in Kentucky such as the Pension Crisis.

The corruption in Kentucky runs far and wide and seeks to be ended this year.  The time is now for change…not later.  We cannot wait another year to be lawful!

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http://antiquecannabisbook.com/Appendix/AppendixC.htm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1ggjadAnSg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Crosslin

http://rainbowfarmcamp.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5moSy-Ooouk&t=294s

https://www.kentucky.com/news/politics-government/article44148519.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5312634/

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/19RS/HB136/bill.pdf

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/19RS/SB80/bill.pdf

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/19RS/sb83/orig_bill.pdf

https://norml.org/states

https://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherburnham/2018/06/29/kentucky-retirement-systems-a-case-study-of-politicizing-pensions/#514247ce299a

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp_in_Kentucky

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gatewood_Galbraith

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/10/26/rights-and-freedoms-may-in-no-case-be-exercised-contrary-to-purposes-and-principles-of-the-united-nations-how-the-united-nations-is-stealing-our-unalienable-rights-to-grow/

(KY) SB 118–Relating to Medical Cannabis

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, suit and indoor

Thank you Senator Steve West for giving KY patients the freedom to try cannabis.  SB118 will give patients the choice to try cannabis for their condition without fear of prosecution, imprisonment, loss of parental rights…LINK

SB 118(BR-1392)(click bill number to view bill details.)

Title:  AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

Sponsor(s):

West , Stephen
Seum , Dan “Malano”
Clark , Perry B.
Thomas , Reginald
Embry Jr. , C.B.

Current Status:

introduced in Senate
In Senate

Summary:

Create new sections of KRS Chapter 218A to define terms; restrict medical cannabis to certain patients with qualifying debilitating conditions; establish requirements for cultivation, production, processing, distribution, and sale in compassion centers; establish requirements for patients, visiting patients, and caregivers; establish professional protections for practitioners; establish certain protections for cardholders; establish responsibilities for cardholders; allow restrictions on possession, possession while operating a motor vehicle, and smoking; specify that use of medical cannabis by a qualifying patient is to be treated the same as use of prescribed pharmaceutical medications; establish additional protections for medical use; specify that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the costs of use or prohibits an employer from disciplining an employee for workplace impairment; establish a medical purpose defense for some uses of medical cannabis; establish the Department for Medical Cannabis Administration to enforce the program’s provisions;  LINK

https://secure.kentucky.gov/billwatch/BillSummary.aspx?br_rsn=41570&ses_rsn=101

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/recorddocuments/bill/18RS/SB118/bill.pdf

Support Sen. Perry Clark: SB57 and SB76 (2017)

NORML

Legislation filed by Senator Perry Clark of Louisville, SB 57, seeks to establish a statewide, comprehensive medical marijuana program.

Senate Bill 57, The Cannabis Compassion Act, establishes regulations overseeing the establishment of state-licensed dispensaries to provide medical marijuana to qualified patients. It also permits patients to home cultivate their own supply of medical cannabis.

Senator Clark said: “Too many Kentuckians have had their lives stymied with criminal records as a result of nonviolent marijuana convictions. That is wrong. It is time to stop making criminals out of citizens due to outdated and ridiculous laws concerning cannabis.”

Under present state law, the possession of any amount of cannabis is classified as a criminal misdemeanor punishable by up to 45 days in jail, a fine, and a criminal record.

Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia have enacted statewide provisions allowing patients access to cannabis therapy. Data from other states finds that the enactment of medical marijuana access is associated with lower rates of opioid abuse and mortality, and does not negatively impact workplace safety, teen use, or motor vehicle safety.

Kentucky patients deserve these same protections.

Click here to contact your Senator and urge their support for this measure.

Additionally, Senator Clark has introduced Senate Bill 76, to legalize the possession and use of limited amounts of marijuana for those over the age of 21.

SB 76, the Cannabis Freedom Act, allows adults to possess up to one ounce of cannabis, to cultivate up to five cannabis plants, to store excess cannabis lawfully grown for personal use at the location where it was cultivated; and to transfer up to one ounce of cannabis to another person age 21 or older without remuneration.

Eight states, encompassing some 20 percent of the US population, have enacted similar adult use regulations. 

Click here contact your Senator and urge their support piece of legislation as well.

Thanks for all you do,
The NORML Team

P.S. Our work is supported by thousands of people throughout the country as we work to advance marijuana reform in all 50 states and the federal level. Can you kick in $10 or $25 a month to help us keep going?

NORML and the NORML Foundation: 1100 H Street NW, Suite 830, Washington DC, 20005
Tel: (202) 483-5500 • Fax: (202) 483-0057 • Email: norml@norml.org

https://legiscan.com/KY/research/SB57/2017

https://legiscan.com/KY/bill/SB76/2017

Senator Perry Clark has pre-filed a bill for the 2017 legislative season that pertains to legalizing marijuana in the state …

 

Marijuana Legalization laws hit the books in Kentucky in 2017.

 

Almost one year after filing the Cannabis Freedom Act, Kentucky State Senator Perry Clark has pre-filed a bill for the 2017 legislative season that pertains to legalizing marijuana in the state.

Filed on December 6 for the January, 2017, legislative season, the new bill is called the Cannabis Compassion Act and is filed as BR 409. Nevertheless, little has changed between the wording of the proposed laws of 2015, 2016, and the new 2017 Cannabis Freedom Act.

Now, voters will get another chance to see if this Kentucky marijuana legalization bill will fizzle out or get accepted into law.

Alternatively, the fact that recent elections have replaced some candidates could mean the newcomers are more receptive to marijuana legalization than their predecessors.

Before the elections, Norml gave most of Kentucky’s congressional members a poor rating for their lack of support for any type of marijuana legalization. The exceptions are Republican pro-marijuana legalization advocates Senator Rand Paul and Representative Thomas Massie.

In particular, it was noted that many Republican Kentuckians in the House of Representatives voted against the 2016 Veterans Equal Access Amendment.

While these elected officials in the U.S. House of Representatives might not be voting for federal legalization of medical marijuana or cannabis, there is still hope that the Kentucky State Senate will have new members that decide to vote for marijuana legalization.

Ballotpedia points out that the Kentucky State Senate had “19 of 38 total seats… up for election in 2016.” The outcome of this election did have some surprises, such as a large number of state senators running for re-election while also being unopposed.

Another interesting note in history is that the current bipartisan makeup of 11 Democrats and 27 Republicans in the Kentucky State Senate has remained the same before and after the election.

This meant that there was no shift in the number of Democrats or Republicans at the Kentucky State Senate before or after the November 8 elections, but there will be a few newly elected officials voting on the Cannabis Compassion Act in 2017.

On the other hand, Kentucky might need to worry about Republicans voting against marijuana legalization because many members of the GOP are not as anti-marijuana legalization as they were in the recent past.

For example, Atlantic quoted Bill Bennett, former Education Secretary under George W. Bush, at a panel discussion at the Conservative Political Action Conference, titled “Rocky Mountain High: Does Legalized Pot Mean Society’s Going Up In Smoke?” During the panel discussion in 2014, Bill Bennett said there “used to be a strong conservative coalition opposed to drugs.”

However, in 2014, it was clear to Bill Bennett and other GOP members that the conservative anti-marijuana legalization viewpoint was dissipating in the face of mounting public support for legalization. Bennett concluded with the sentiment that Republicans are “fighting against the tide” on the legal marijuana issue.

In the past, the issues with marijuana legalization in Kentucky in 2016 centered on behind-closed-doors meetings about the proposed law.

Two Kentucky state senators that were commonly quoted as being unsure about passing a marijuana legalization law in the state were John Schickel and Jimmy Higdon. Both of these senators are still in elected positions, and this means they will have another chance to vote on marijuana legalization in January, 2017.

For example, the last update about the 2016 marijuana legalization law in Kentucky was around September, according to WFPL. At that time, it was determined that the 2016 Cannabis Freedom Act was “assigned to a committee but never received a hearing.”

Kentucky state senator Jimmy Higdon was quoted at that time saying that he was not sure how the bill would manifest, and also said marijuana legalization might only be implemented for “end-of-life situations.”

Although Senator Jimmy Higdon’s remarks stand out, an attempt to push the 2017 Cannabis Compassion Act may not be futile despite it being denied in the past. For instance, it appears the Kentucky State Senate was expecting there to be another marijuana legalization bill to vote on in 2017.

In July, North Kentucky Tribune spoke with Kentucky state senator John Schickel, and he was paraphrased as saying that while the Cannabis Freedom Act “never made it to the Senate floor for a vote,” the issue is still considered relevant and “legislators want to further research the issue prior to the start of next year’s session in January [2017].”

As previously reported by the Inquisitr, other pre-filed bills for Kentucky to vote on in 2017 include increasing penalties related to narcotics.

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Lawmakers discuss pros and cons of medical marijuana

 

 

 

FRANKFORT – A state legislative committee met today to discuss liberalizing marijuana laws for medical purposes.

“We have been literally overwhelmed with correspondence and people wanting to testify before this committee today,” said Sen. John Schickel, R-Union, who chaired the meeting of the Interim Joint Committee on Licensing and Occupations.

He said he asked that the subject of medical marijuana be placed on the agenda after several bills concerning marijuana were assigned to the Senate Standing Committee on Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations during the final weeks of the 2016 General Assembly.

“At that time I made a commitment to the people both supporting and opposed to the legislation that we would have extensive hearings during the interim to learn more,” Schickel said. “It is really relevant legislation for our times. We have states all around us that are dealing with it also.”

Sen. Perry B. Clark, D-Louisville, testified about last session’s Senate Bill 263, which would have legalized medical cannabis.

“Where they’ve passed medical cannabis laws none of the cataclysmic predictions have materialized in any form,” he said.

Clark was followed by testimony from Sen. Morgan McGarvey, D-Louisville, who introduced Senate Bill 304 last session. SB 304 sought to legalize medical marijuana for palliative or hospice care.

“If you have eight months to live and something makes you comfortable … why wouldn’t we allow it?” he said. “We prescribe morphine and fentanyl to these same patients – literally drugs that are killing people in Kentucky.”

Dr. Gregory Barnes of the University of Louisville testified about his research into the effectiveness of cannabidiol, known as CBD, in epilepsy.

“It might not only represent a compound that is anti-seizer in character but also a compound that improves behaviors and cognition,” said Barnes. “I think that is a very important point for the committee to understand.”

Jaime Montalvo, founder of Kentuckians for Medical Marijuana, spoke about using cannabis to treat his multiple sclerosis.

“We believe conservatively that this can help over 100,000 Kentucky patients,” he said. “It would create economic growth, and it would potentially get rid of the black market we have today.”

Dr. Danesh Mazloomdoost, a Lexington pain management specialist, cautioned legislators about the dangers of hastily passing medical marijuana legislation.

“We can sensationalize the failures of conventional medicines as a rationale for legalization,” he said, adding marijuana isn’t a fix for these failures.

He said while some, like Montalvo, might find relief from marijuana their stories are not representative of the average medical marijuana recipient.

Kentucky Narcotic Officers’ Association (KNOA) President Micky Hatmaker said 25 other states have expanded access to cannabis for medical purposes either by ballot referendum or legislative intent.

“That is contrary to the process by which all other drugs have been tested and approved,” he said. “All drugs intended for human consumption are required to have been tested and approved by the Food and Drug Administration.”

Hatmaker said the concept of cannabis as medicine began in California in 1996 when they allowed access to cannabis, either smoked or ingested, to treat terminally ill patients and those who suffered from debilitating diseases.

“In spite of the best intentions of these 25 states, raw marijuana either smoked or ingested is not medicine and has never been passed through the rigorous DA approval process to ensure the health and safety of patients,” he said. “The KNOA believes that medications, including marijuana-based drugs, should go through the scientific process, and should be accessed through legitimate physicians.”

— END —

"Cannabis is medicine," Clark said.

mmjky16

 

Even though the next session of the Kentucky legislature is months away, debate on whether to legalize medical marijuana is already underway.

Legislators heard Friday from the law enforcement community and physicians.

State Sen. Perry Clark, whose proposal last year never got out of committee, has promised to keep introducing medical marijuana legislation until his fellow lawmakers see the light.

But he has plenty of hurdles to jump before that happens.

“Cannabis is medicine,” Clark said.

Medical marijuana is legal in 25 states, and Clark wants Kentucky to be next. He argues that no one has ever died from cannabis. Clark contends that misconceptions and false information are being disseminated by opponents.

“In general say their biggest concern increase cannabis use among teens. There is mountains of evidence that this is not going on,” Clark said.

Mickey Hatmakers, who heads the Kentucky Narcotics Officers Association, calls it a getaway drug.

“It is very clear in the states where cannabis has been legalized for medical purposes, marijuana use by 12 to 17-year-olds is the highest,” Hatmaker said.

Because medical marijuana is expected be a hot topic over the next year, the legislative hearing was aimed at getting a head start on the controversy.

UofL researcher Gregory Barnes said the compound CBD in marijuana provides protection from seizures in epilepsy patients.

Jaimie Montalvo, of Kentuckians for Medical Marijuana, said prescribed drugs also have a downside. He has multiple sclerosis.

“As you can imagine, these prescriptions have dozens of side effects liver problems, kidney problems. They cause a lot of issues in our body,” Montalvo said.

A packed house listened to pros and cons.

As of Friday, no bills regarding medical marijuana had been pre-filed for the 2017 Legislature.

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