Police used hidden video camera, microchips to track marijuana found at ex-sheriff’s farm

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By Bill Estep

bestep@herald-leader.com

September 18, 2017 11:49 AM

Former Jackson County Sheriff Denny Peyman allegedly supplied marijuana plants to two other men to grow on Peyman’s farm, a state police detective testified Monday.

Peyman was a participant in the state’s experimental effort to develop hemp as a commercial crop for farmers.

Darren Allen, the state police detective, said he suspected that Peyman and the two men allegedly involved with him thought police would think the marijuana was hemp.

Allen testified that state police spotted suspected marijuana plants at Peyman’s farm during aerial surveillance in July. The plants were in a tree line and were surrounded by weeds about 350 yards from the industrial hemp on Peyman’s farm in the southern part of Jackson County, Allen said.

State police sneaked to the plants without Peyman’s knowledge, took samples, mounted hidden cameras near the plants and a nearby parking spot, and put tracking microchips in six of the 61 plants at the site, Allen said.

Police covertly checked the plot on Sept. 5 and found that the marijuana had been harvested. The video showed two men who were allegedly involved with Peyman harvesting the plants the day before, Allen said.

Police got a warrant to search Peyman’s barn and house on Sept. 6 and arrested him after finding suspected marijuana plants. The plants were in a hidden room in his barn, Allen said.

There were 71 plants. It is possible that some of the original 61 split while being harvested, Allen aid.

Allen testified that five of the microchips he had put in the suspected marijuana plants at the back of Peyman’s farm were found in plants in the barn.

Tests showed that the plants had a higher level of the “high”-producing chemical than industrial hemp plants involved in Kentucky’s pilot program are allowed to have, Allen said.

The two men who were allegedly growing the pot on Peyman’s farm, Edward Hoskins and Arthur “Fuzzy” Gibson, told police they understood that Peyman was in danger of losing his farm and wanted to get into the marijuana business to save the farm, Allen said.

Both men said Pyeman supplied them the plants found growing on his farm, and that they were growing the pot for him, Allen testified.

Jackson District Judge Henria Bailey Lewis ruled that there is probable cause to forward Peyman’s case to a grand jury for a possible indictment.

She set a hearing for Nov. 7 for Peyman to answer the indictment if the grand jury charges him.

Peyman is charged with cultivating marijuana and trafficking in steroids. He is free on bond.

Sean Southard, a spokesman for the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, said Peyman left the state’s pilot industrial hemp program after he was arrested.

Bill Estep: 606-678-4655, @billestep1

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Former Kentucky jail guard convicted of beating inmate who later died

 

 

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A former Kentucky jail guard was convicted of beating an inmate and leaving him lying with blood on his face, until another jail employee saw the victim and he was rushed to a hospital and pronounced dead, officials said on Friday.

A federal jury deliberated for an hour and a half before returning the verdict late on Thursday against William Howell, a former deputy jailer at Kentucky River Regional Jail in the town of Hazard, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a statement.

The panel found Howell guilty of excessive force and of ignoring the inmate’s injuries and he faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison for each criminal count when he is sentenced on Aug. 16 at a federal court in London, Kentucky.

Howell, 60, and another guard beat inmate Larry Trent, 54, on July 9, 2013, after he was booked on a charge of drunken driving.

It started when the two guards opened Trent’s cell door to remove a sleeping mat. Trent ran out and the jailers punched, kicked and stomped on Trent before taking him back to his cell, where Howell kicked Trent in the head while he lay on the ground, the Department of Justice statement said.

An autopsy found Trent died of a fracture to his pelvis that caused hemorrhaging and from blunt force trauma to his head, chest and limbs.

Damon Hickman, the other guard, pleaded guilty last year to depriving Trent of his legal rights and falsifying records for his role in the beating, according to court records. He has not yet been sentenced for those convictions.

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http://perrycounty.ky.gov/da/Pages/jail.aspx

2-year DVO issued against Glasgow police sergeant

Posted: Tuesday, June 17, 2014 11:16 am

By the Daily News |

A Metcalfe County judge issued a domestic violence order of protection against Glasgow Police Department Sgt. Jarrod Steele, department spokeswoman Julie Anne Williams said.

The order is in place for two years and prohibits Steele from possession of any guns while not on police duty, Williams said.

Glasgow Police Chief Guy Turcotte put Steele on paid administrative leave until further notice.

This is the second Glasgow officer in two weeks to face domestic violence accusations.

Officer Joseph Ford’s estranged wife, Katja Ford, 38, filed June 10 for an emergency protective order, Barren Circuit Court records show. The following day, she filed for divorce. 

The file containing the protection order is not open for public inspection. Kentucky State Police served a domestic violence summons on Ford earlier.

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Ky. county, corrections dispute jail inspection

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Published: December 24, 2012

The Associated Press

GLASGOW, Ky. — The Kentucky Department of Corrections is standing by the conclusion of one if its employees after a county magistrate accused the person of writing a false inspection report about the Barren County Jail.

Corrections spokeswoman Lisa Lamb told the Glasgow Daily Times ( http://bit.ly/V6zWyb) that she was aware of Magistrate Chris Steward’s accusation about Jail Inspector Tracey Reed. Lamb said the department has “absolute confidence” in the abilities of the agency’s employees.

Reed conducted a routine, unannounced inspection of the Barren County Detention Center on Nov. 27. The official report following the inspection noted that the jail had “slight overcrowding,” which didn’t require action from the DOC.

In a Dec. 18 meeting, Steward said county jail inmates must have complaints about something and therefore Reed’s report should not be deemed credible.

Information from: Glasgow Daily Times, http://www.glasgowdailytimes.com

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2012/12/24/2454922/ky-county-corrections-dispute.html#storylink=cpy