Important Bills to watch in Kentucky

Every so often I post emails containing the Bills being worked on in Kentucky, from the Legislature.  I thought I would post a list for the Medical Marijuana and adult use Cannabis Bills, and a few other Bills of interest as well.  There are several hundred this year and there is no way anyone could keep up with all of them.  I encourage you to go to the link and browse them for yourself.  It can be interesting and informative reading!

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By clicking on the above LINK you will access the website of the Kentucky Legislature.

Then you can access Bill Watch and register to track the bills that interest YOU.

Bill Watch – This free service enables registered users unlimited tracking of legislation during the Kentucky Legislative Session.


Cannabis Bills include:

SB 80 (BR 906) Sponsors:  Dan Malano Seum  / An Act To Regulate Cannabis.

HB 166 (BR 184) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT relating to medical cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

SB 118 (BR 1392) Sponsor: Multiple / AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

HCR 34 (BR 447) Sponsors: Multiple / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION calling for the expediting of research regarding the safety and efficacy of the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

SB 23 (BR 163)  Sponsors:  Julian M Carroll; Reginald Thomas; Denise Harper Angel; / AN ACT relating to cannabidiol use.  Create a new section of KRS Chapter 218A to permit a physician to recommend the use of cannabidiol or cannabidiol products;

Hemp Bills include:

HCR 35 (BR 878) Sponsors:  DJ Johnson; Kimberly Poore Moser / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging Congress to amend the federal Controlled Substances Act to remove hemp from the definition of marijuana.

Other Issues:

HB 35 (BR  173)  Sponsors:  C. Wesley Morgan / AN ACT relating to public assistance.  Amend KRS 205.200 to create a substance abuse screening program for adult recipients of public assistance, food stamps, and state medical assistance.

HCR  106 (BR  1116)  Sponsors:  Multiple / A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging Congress and the President of the United States to enact a long-term reauthorization of the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

HB 243 (BR 313) Sponsors:  Toby Herald; Adam Koenig / AN ACT relating to the consolidation of counties.

HB 242 (BR 331) Sponsors:  Toby Herald / AN ACT relating to school districts.

SB 2 (BR 308) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT proposing an amendment to Section 54 of the Constitution of Kentucky. / The General Assembly shall have power to Limit the amount to be recovered for injuries resulting in death. / allow the General Assembly the power to limit damages for injuries resulting in death or for injuries to persons or property, and to provide a uniform statute of limitations;

HB 124 (BR 139) Sponsors: Addia Wuchner;  Kimberly Poore Moser / AN ACT relating to enhanced standards and criteria for substance use disorder treatment and recovery services and programs and declaring an emergency.

HB 213 (BR 1202) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to data-sharing of prescription drug monitoring information.  Amend KRS 218A.245 to allow KASPER data-sharing agreements with different types of jurisdictions.

HB 148 (BR 440)  Sponsors: Addia Wuchner; Kimberly Poore Moser /AN ACT relating to prescription medications in hospice programs.   Create a new section of KRS Chapter 381 to shift ownership of controlled substances from a deceased hospice patient to a hospice program so the hospice program may dispose of the controlled substances.

HB 115 (BR 260)  Sponsors:  Robby Mills / AN ACT relating to reporting prescriptions to terminate a pregnancy.  Amend KRS 213.101 to require a physician to report a prescription for mifeprex, misoprostol, or any other drug or combination of drugs that are intended to end a pregnancy…

SB 5 (BR 216) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to pharmacy benefits in the Medicaid program.  Create a new section of KRS Chapter 205 to require the Department for Medicaid Services to directly administer all outpatient pharmacy benefits; prohibit renewal or negotiation of new contracts to provide Medicaid managed care that allow administration of outpatient benefits by any entity but the Department for Medicaid Services;

HB 85 (BR 126)  Sponsors:  Scott Wells; / AN ACT relating to elimination of the certificate of need.  Amend KRS 13B.020 to delete reference to certificate of need hearings; amend KRS 79.080 to replace the Kentucky Health Facilities and Health Services Certificate of Need and Licensure Board with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services;

HB 167 (BR 400) Sponsors:  Multiple / AN ACT relating to abandoned infants. Amend KRS 405.075 to establish a definition and allow the use of a “newborn safety device” related to the anonymous surrendering of a newborn infant in the Commonwealth.

HR 98 (BR 1061) Sponsors:  Multiple / A RESOLUTION urging the United States Congress to propose an amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America promoting equality of citizenship by establishing that artificial entities, such as corporations, associations, or other similar groups, are not persons and can be regulated, and that money is not speech and can be regulated.

SB 4 (BR 110) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT proposing to amend Section 95 of the Constitution of Kentucky relating to the election of state officers.  Propose to amend Section 95 of the Constitution of Kentucky to hold the election of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Treasurer, Auditor of Public Accounts, Attorney General, Secretary of State and Commissioner of Agriculture, Labor and Statistics in even-numbered years, every four years, beginning in 2024;

HB 195 (BR 1056) Sponsors: Multiple / Amend KRS 344.010 to include definitions for “sexual orientation” and “gender identity”; amend KRS 344.020, relating to the purpose of the Kentucky’s civil rights chapter, to include a prohibition against discrimination because of sexual orientation and gender identity.

HB 303 (BR 1059) Sponsors: Multiple / Amend KRS 337.010, relating to the definition of “employees” of retail stores and service industries, to increase the applicable threshold of business that applies to from $95,000 to $500,000; amend KRS 337.275 to raise the state minimum wage to not less than $8.80 an hour on August 1, 2018, not less than $10.35 an hour beginning on August 1, 2019, not less than $11.90 an hour beginning on August 1, 2020, not less than $13.45 an hour beginning on August 1, 2021, and not less than $15.00 per hour beginning on August 1, 2022;

SB 48 (BR 265) Sponsors: Multiple / AN ACT relating to child marriage. Amend KRS 402.020 to establish a new minimum age for marriage; amend KRS 402.030 to establish the power of courts to declare a marriage void when one party is under 18 years of age; amend KRS 402.210 to prohibit individuals under the age of 17 years from marrying; establish the process for a 17- year old to petition a court for permission to marry and the criteria for granting the petition; repeal KRS 402.260 which provides for the estate of minors who marry to be placed in receivership until they reach the age of 18 years.


Senate advances bill to change election dates

For Immediate Release

Jan. 11, 2018

Senate advances bill to change election dates

FRANKFORT – Legislation that would move the election of Kentucky’s governor and other statewide officers to even-numbered years passed the state Senate today by a 24-11 vote.

Senate Bill 4 sponsor Sen. Christian McDaniel, R-Taylor Mill, said the legislation would save about $15.5 million in taxpayer money, triple voter turnout in downballot races and simplify the election system by aligning Kentucky’s election cycle with presidential elections.

McDaniel said it is at least the fifth session a bill to change Kentucky’s election cycle has been filed in the last decade.

“While it might have a little bit of a different number every time we see it, the principles remain the same,” he said in reference to the different bill numbers the legislation has been assigned over the years.

Sen. Reginald Thomas, D-Lexington, spoke against the bill. He said SB 4 would blur the line between state and federal issues.

“I don’t think we should confuse who is running for president … with who is going to be our governor,” Thomas said. “This bill goes the wrong direction.”

Sen. Tom Buford, R-Nicholasville, stood to explain his vote in favor of the SB 4.

“There was a gentleman named Charles de Gaulle who said, ‘Politics is too serious of a matter to be left to politicians.’ Let’s let the people decide what they want for a change.”

Since SB 4 is a constitutional amendment, the legislation will require a supermajority in the state House before it could be placed on the ballot in November to be decided upon by the people.

— END —

(KY) This Week in Frankfort

January 12, 2018

This Week in Frankfort

January 8-11

FRANKFORT — The General Assembly’s 2018 session passed one of its early milestones this week as the first bill to clear a chamber this year was approved by the Kentucky Senate on Wednesday.

The legislation, known as Senate Bill 3, brought back an issue lawmakers have considered before: adding language to the state constitution that specifies certain rights that should be afforded to crime victims. These rights would include notice of all criminal court proceedings involving the accused, reasonable protection from the accused, timely notice of the release or escape of the accused and the right to full restitution to be paid by the convicted.

If Senate Bill 3 is approved by lawmakers, then Kentucky voters would get to decide whether this change is made to the state constitution.

The legislation is part of a national movement to establish Marsy’s Laws, named in memory of Marsy Nicholas, who was killed in the 1980s by her ex-boyfriend in California.

Another top issue this week focused on the possibility of moving the election of Kentucky’s governor and other statewide officers to even-numbered years. Supporters say this would save the state money on election costs and increase voter turnout. A House Committee has approved House Bill 23 on this matter, while the full Senate has approved similar legislation, Senate Bill 4.

If either bill is approved by both chambers, a proposed constitutional amendment on the matter would be decided on by Kentucky voters.

Other bills that took steps forward this week include:

Senate Bill 7, which would establish the Kentucky Rare Disease Advisory Council and Trust Fund to promote research, treatment and education on rare diseases. The bill was approved by the Senate on Thursday and sent to the House for consideration

House Bill 88, approved by the House State Government Committee on Thursday, would allow unclaimed state property to be the only source of funding for operation of the Office of the State Treasurer. The measure is aimed at giving some relief to the state budget. The bill now goes to the full House for consideration.

HB 84 would improve efforts to accommodate the wishes of people who want to be organ and tissue donors. The bill would require coroners and medical examiners to contact the Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates if a deceased person’s body is suitable for organ or tissue donation. The bill was approved Wednesday by the House Licensing, Occupations & Administrative Regulations Committee and now goes to the House for consideration.

Senate Bill 8 would provide civil immunity for damaging a vehicle if a person enters the vehicle with the reasonable, good-faith belief that a dog or cat is in immediate danger of death if not removed. The legislation passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday and now heads to the full senate for consideration.

The Senate and House will not convene on Monday, January 15th in observance of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Lawmakers will return to the Capitol on Tuesday, January 16. That same day the governor will give his State of the Commonwealth address in which he is expected to lay out details on his proposed budget. The biennial budget is a top priority this session and once the governor hands over his proposal, the House and Senate will begin making changes so that the final budget proposal reflects their priorities.

If you’d like to share feedback on issues under consideration with state lawmakers, please call the General Assembly’s toll-free message line at 1-800-372-7181.


(3/10/17) Senate President Pro Tempore David Givens Week in Review

Senate President Pro Tempore David Givens
Week in Review

A flurry of activity stemming from committee meetings and the passage of bills marked a short but intense Week 6 of the Kentucky General Assembly. Although the Senate was only in session from Monday to Wednesday of this week, committee meetings still met during the later part of the week to give final hearings to a few select bills.

Quite a few pieces of legislation have already made it to Governor Bevin’s desk to await his signature. Senate Bill 17, relating to student rights to political and religious speech, was given final passage by the House this week. Senate Bill 101 would allow pharmacists to administer more immunizations to children, and Senate Bill 117, allowing veterans who meet certain criteria to obtain special teaching certificates, were also finally passed by the House.

The Senate also enrolled House bills to be sent to the Governor’s desk for his signature, including: House Bill 14, which makes committing an offense against a first responder a hate crime; House Bill 93, strengthening penalties for assaulting a law enforcement animal, also known as “Ernie’s Law”; and House Bill 189, increasing transparency within area development districts.

Senate Bill 50 would allow school districts that choose to start the school year no earlier than the Monday closest to August 26 to follow a “variable student instructional year.” Schools which start the school year a little later in August than other schools, would not have to meet a 170-day requirement for the school year, as long as students still receive 1,062 hours of instruction each year, which is considered the equivalent of 170 school days. Senate Bill 50 was passed by the Senate 33-1 on February 9 and approved 77-18 by the House on March 8. It now awaits the Governor’s signature.

Senate legislation that would allow medical review panels to review medical malpractice lawsuits before they go to court was also sent to the Governor last week.  Senate Bill 4 would establish a process for medical review panels to review cases and issue opinions that could be used as evidence in court if a case proceeds. It does not prevent any citizen’s access to the courts. The bill was approved by the Senate 23-13 on January 5 and approved 51-45 by the House on March 1. It was delivered to the Governor on March 6.

The General Assembly is now quickly approaching the end of the 2017 Session. We adjourned on March 8, marking day 26 of 30 of the session, and we will reconvene again on March 14 and 15 before going into the veto period. During that period the Governor has the power to veto bills, but the General Assembly can override vetoes on the last two days of session, March 29 and 30.  If you have questions about the status of bills, please feel free to contact my office or review the Legislative Record online which can be found at

If you have any questions or comments about these issues or any other public policy issue, please call me toll-free at 1-800-372-7181. You can also review the Legislature’s work online at

David Givens

Senate President Pro Tem


Commonwealth of Kentucky
Office of Senator Stan Humphries

For Immediate Release
February 5, 2016
Contact: John Cox



FRANKFORT – The fifth week of the 2016 General Assembly was a time to reflect on the giants that have served before us in the Kentucky State Senate while keeping a focus on the task at hand – being fiscal stewards of tax dollars while navigating the state through an ever-changing world.

The contemplation was prompted by the death of former State Senator Georgia Davis Powers, who laid in state in the Capitol Rotunda on Thursday. What she was able to accomplish in her 92 years of life is a reminder that no matter how slow and deliberate the legislative process can seem, great ideas can – and will – triumph.

Senate Bill (SB) 4 was the first pro-life bill to pass both chambers in over a decade. Senate Bill 4 would require a woman to consult with a doctor either face-to-face or by video-conference at least 24 hours prior to going forward with an abortion procedure. After the bill received concurrence in the Senate Tuesday, it was immediately delivered to Governor Bevin’s office by a large delegation of our Senate members. The Governor signed the bill on the spot, further promoting our efforts to protect the rights of the unborn.

Also passing this week in the Senate was SB 7 which is aimed at defunding Planned Parenthood. I am pleased to say it passed the Senate with bipartisan support.

Other bills advancing to the House of Representatives after passing the Senate include:

· Dubbed the “Jailers with No Jails Act,” Senate Bill 96 would require fiscal courts in counties with no jails to annually pass ordinances that outline the responsibility of their county jailer. The bill would also require jailers to submit to the same fiscal courts a summary of all official duties performed, including information related to inmate transport. The sponsor of SB 96 said he filed it in response to media reports of a few county jailers in counties with no jails drawing salaries “not commensurate” to their duties.

· Pension reorganization legislation, given the designation of Senate Bill 2, was the result of the two years’ worth of work by the Public Pension Oversight Board. Senate Bill 2 would make state retirement systems’ transactions more transparent, hold the systems accountable when contracting out services, and require that pension trustees have actual investment experience. The sponsor said SB 2 is another attempt to provide senators insight into the systems so they can provide appropriate oversight.

· In response to the prohibition of scripture readings in a public school’s stage adaptation of “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” Senate Bill 15 is meant to strengthen the expression of religious or political viewpoints in public schools and public postsecondary institutions. Senate Bill 15 would set forth in statute what some protected activities for students are by enumerating the rights of students to express religious and political viewpoints in public. That would include homework, artwork, speeches, and religious messages on items of clothing. Senate Bill 15 would also enumerate the rights of religious student groups to access school facilities after hours for meetings and to use school-produced media to announce such meetings.

Since we are just over one-third through the session, an increasingly greater amount of our time will be spent on budgetary issues. You can stay up-to-date on the budget negotiations and other legislative actions throughout the session by logging onto the Legislative Research Commission (LRC) website at or by calling the LRC toll-free bill status line at 866-840-2835. For committee meeting schedules, please call the LRC toll-free meeting information line at 800-633-9650. To comment on a bill, please call the toll-free legislative message line at 800-372-7181.

You can write to me anytime at my legislative office at 702 Capitol Avenue, Room 209, Frankfort, KY 40601. I look forward to hearing from you.

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Note:  Senator Stan Humphries (R-Cadiz) represents the 1st Senate District including Calloway, Fulton, Graves, Hickman, Lyon and Trigg counties. For a high-resolution .jpeg of Senator Humphries, please visit