Support Sen. Perry Clark: SB57 and SB76 (2017)

NORML

Legislation filed by Senator Perry Clark of Louisville, SB 57, seeks to establish a statewide, comprehensive medical marijuana program.

Senate Bill 57, The Cannabis Compassion Act, establishes regulations overseeing the establishment of state-licensed dispensaries to provide medical marijuana to qualified patients. It also permits patients to home cultivate their own supply of medical cannabis.

Senator Clark said: “Too many Kentuckians have had their lives stymied with criminal records as a result of nonviolent marijuana convictions. That is wrong. It is time to stop making criminals out of citizens due to outdated and ridiculous laws concerning cannabis.”

Under present state law, the possession of any amount of cannabis is classified as a criminal misdemeanor punishable by up to 45 days in jail, a fine, and a criminal record.

Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia have enacted statewide provisions allowing patients access to cannabis therapy. Data from other states finds that the enactment of medical marijuana access is associated with lower rates of opioid abuse and mortality, and does not negatively impact workplace safety, teen use, or motor vehicle safety.

Kentucky patients deserve these same protections.

Click here to contact your Senator and urge their support for this measure.

Additionally, Senator Clark has introduced Senate Bill 76, to legalize the possession and use of limited amounts of marijuana for those over the age of 21.

SB 76, the Cannabis Freedom Act, allows adults to possess up to one ounce of cannabis, to cultivate up to five cannabis plants, to store excess cannabis lawfully grown for personal use at the location where it was cultivated; and to transfer up to one ounce of cannabis to another person age 21 or older without remuneration.

Eight states, encompassing some 20 percent of the US population, have enacted similar adult use regulations. 

Click here contact your Senator and urge their support piece of legislation as well.

Thanks for all you do,
The NORML Team

P.S. Our work is supported by thousands of people throughout the country as we work to advance marijuana reform in all 50 states and the federal level. Can you kick in $10 or $25 a month to help us keep going?

NORML and the NORML Foundation: 1100 H Street NW, Suite 830, Washington DC, 20005
Tel: (202) 483-5500 • Fax: (202) 483-0057 • Email: norml@norml.org

https://legiscan.com/KY/research/SB57/2017

https://legiscan.com/KY/bill/SB76/2017

Senator Perry Clark has pre-filed a bill for the 2017 legislative season that pertains to legalizing marijuana in the state …

 

Marijuana Legalization laws hit the books in Kentucky in 2017.

 

Almost one year after filing the Cannabis Freedom Act, Kentucky State Senator Perry Clark has pre-filed a bill for the 2017 legislative season that pertains to legalizing marijuana in the state.

Filed on December 6 for the January, 2017, legislative season, the new bill is called the Cannabis Compassion Act and is filed as BR 409. Nevertheless, little has changed between the wording of the proposed laws of 2015, 2016, and the new 2017 Cannabis Freedom Act.

Now, voters will get another chance to see if this Kentucky marijuana legalization bill will fizzle out or get accepted into law.

Alternatively, the fact that recent elections have replaced some candidates could mean the newcomers are more receptive to marijuana legalization than their predecessors.

Before the elections, Norml gave most of Kentucky’s congressional members a poor rating for their lack of support for any type of marijuana legalization. The exceptions are Republican pro-marijuana legalization advocates Senator Rand Paul and Representative Thomas Massie.

In particular, it was noted that many Republican Kentuckians in the House of Representatives voted against the 2016 Veterans Equal Access Amendment.

While these elected officials in the U.S. House of Representatives might not be voting for federal legalization of medical marijuana or cannabis, there is still hope that the Kentucky State Senate will have new members that decide to vote for marijuana legalization.

Ballotpedia points out that the Kentucky State Senate had “19 of 38 total seats… up for election in 2016.” The outcome of this election did have some surprises, such as a large number of state senators running for re-election while also being unopposed.

Another interesting note in history is that the current bipartisan makeup of 11 Democrats and 27 Republicans in the Kentucky State Senate has remained the same before and after the election.

This meant that there was no shift in the number of Democrats or Republicans at the Kentucky State Senate before or after the November 8 elections, but there will be a few newly elected officials voting on the Cannabis Compassion Act in 2017.

On the other hand, Kentucky might need to worry about Republicans voting against marijuana legalization because many members of the GOP are not as anti-marijuana legalization as they were in the recent past.

For example, Atlantic quoted Bill Bennett, former Education Secretary under George W. Bush, at a panel discussion at the Conservative Political Action Conference, titled “Rocky Mountain High: Does Legalized Pot Mean Society’s Going Up In Smoke?” During the panel discussion in 2014, Bill Bennett said there “used to be a strong conservative coalition opposed to drugs.”

However, in 2014, it was clear to Bill Bennett and other GOP members that the conservative anti-marijuana legalization viewpoint was dissipating in the face of mounting public support for legalization. Bennett concluded with the sentiment that Republicans are “fighting against the tide” on the legal marijuana issue.

In the past, the issues with marijuana legalization in Kentucky in 2016 centered on behind-closed-doors meetings about the proposed law.

Two Kentucky state senators that were commonly quoted as being unsure about passing a marijuana legalization law in the state were John Schickel and Jimmy Higdon. Both of these senators are still in elected positions, and this means they will have another chance to vote on marijuana legalization in January, 2017.

For example, the last update about the 2016 marijuana legalization law in Kentucky was around September, according to WFPL. At that time, it was determined that the 2016 Cannabis Freedom Act was “assigned to a committee but never received a hearing.”

Kentucky state senator Jimmy Higdon was quoted at that time saying that he was not sure how the bill would manifest, and also said marijuana legalization might only be implemented for “end-of-life situations.”

Although Senator Jimmy Higdon’s remarks stand out, an attempt to push the 2017 Cannabis Compassion Act may not be futile despite it being denied in the past. For instance, it appears the Kentucky State Senate was expecting there to be another marijuana legalization bill to vote on in 2017.

In July, North Kentucky Tribune spoke with Kentucky state senator John Schickel, and he was paraphrased as saying that while the Cannabis Freedom Act “never made it to the Senate floor for a vote,” the issue is still considered relevant and “legislators want to further research the issue prior to the start of next year’s session in January [2017].”

As previously reported by the Inquisitr, other pre-filed bills for Kentucky to vote on in 2017 include increasing penalties related to narcotics.

CONTINUE READING…

Marijuana Foes Losing Direction in Kentucky

 
With Thomas Tony Vance and Angela Gatewood.
 
Thomas Tony Vance

 

An Informational Town Hall meeting on Medical Cannabis was held on November 8. 2015 in Alexandria, KY sponsored by Veterans of Foreign Wars Campbell County Post 3205 Auxiliary and Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access. Having given the keynote speech at that event I was surprised and somewhat curious when immediately afterward the opponents of marijuana legalization organized and held one on December 1, 2015. The ‘Marijuana Summit’ was published as giving both sides of the issue.

 
I attended the event. They offered a ‘Legislative Breakfast’ and all our local legislators were there. They seemed to be very close with the organizers of the event. During breakfast Mr. Tony Coder, the Assistant Director of Drug Free Action Alliance, presided over a lively discussion of the issues. Senator Perry Clark, who attended, responded to the notion that since we already have a heroin problem we don’t need to legalize another drug. Ignoring the obvious attempt to link heroin with marijuana Senator Clark pointed out the report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association of a 25% drop in opioid drug overdose deaths in states that have medical cannabis programs and that that percentage is increasing.

The response was a change of subject.

I was struck by the snarky way Mr. Coder regaled us with the story of him breaking California law and lying to obtain a medical marijuana card to prove how easy it was to get one. At this point I was able to get a word in and posed him this query.

California has had medical marijuana since 1996. You say that’s a scam and Californians can access marijuana any time they want. Ok, I’ll give you that, (when I said that he looked surprised, then I continued), however that means the citizens of California have had easy access to marijuana for 20 years. You have to answer this. Where are the bodies? Where are all the bad things you all say will happen if marijuana is legalized?

Another change of subject.

Mr. Coder repeated his easy access claim during the next session on marijuana prohibition history. I quickly pointed out that he proves my point.
Change of subject.

The 3rd session was a speech by Mr. Ed Shemelya, the National Coordinator for the National Marijuana Initiative, a retired police officer who worked extensively with the High Intensity Drug Task Force and gives speeches for a living. He did point out, among a load of numbers that if 2 of the 6 states that will have legalization on the ballot pass it in 2016 it is, as he put it, “all over folks!”
Oh I wish it were true!

I had to leave at the halfway point. The first session after lunch was about hemp which is legal and really only a problem for the helicopter eradication program. The last was about the last 2 Monitoring the Future surveys concerning teen access and use which has not changed significantly with legalization. The interesting thing here is that with the exception of medical need supervised by a Doctor, no State has or will legalize marijuana for anyone under 21, so it’s really a moot point.

They always come back to protecting the children. I wonder? Marijuana has been used by women for menstrual cramps and morning sickness for 4000 years. In all that time there is no anecdotal evidence of birth defects or problems in birth resulting from marijuana use during pregnancy. Given the role we now know the cannabinoid system plays in maintaining good health and the fact of marijuana’s zero toxicity, one can envision a future in which ones Cheerios come, “fortified with THC for your protection”.

The ‘Marijuana Summit’, although misguided was certainly sincere, however we would be better served by them joining in as legalization comes and helping to craft effective policy rather than opposing it completely and having no say in the policy eventually enacted.

 

SOURCE

Sen. Perry B. Clark introduces two new Bills in Kentucky, one for medical marijuana and another for Hemp – Kentucky Legislature gets fired up on Hemp and Cannabis in the last week to introduce new Bills

 

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On Wednesday, March 2, Sen. Perry Clark of Louisville introduced two new Bills, one for Hemp and another for medical marijuana.

 

Senate Bill 262 is AN ACT relating to industrial hemp.

 

The “Industrial Hemp Freedom Act” is an extension of the “Cannabis Freedom Act” and seeks to to allow industrial hemp farming as permissible under federal law.  It would require that to require the Department of Agriculture to promulgate administrative regulations to administer the industrial hemp licensure program among other things. 

(LINK TO PDF SB 262 HERE)

 

As well, Senate Bill 263 was introduced by Sen. Perry Clark on March 2.

Senate Bill 263 is AN ACT relating to medical cannabis.

This is a medical cannabis bill which is meant for patients only as opposed to SB 13, deemed the “Cannabis Freedom Act” which would repeal prohibition for both medical and recreational users of Cannabis in the State of Kentucky.

This bill seeks to establish a comprehensive system for medical cannabis, including provisions for medical verification of need, persons allowed to cultivate, use, and possess the drug, organizations allowed to assist in providing the drug, regulation by the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control, interaction on the part of state and local governments, including law enforcement, with persons and entities coming within the purview of the Act, and the establishment of required reporting and review procedures; rename the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control; amend various KRS sections to conform; name the act the Cannabis Compassion Act.

Although this Bill requires patient access only and verification of need, it DOES allow for patients to grow their own medicine.  At least the patients grow rights are maintained which would mean equal access to medication by the patients.

Although this can in no way be construed as a REPEAL Bill it could be seen as the “lesser of the two evils” as opposed to HB584 which is a much stricter version of a medical marijuana Bill which was filed by Rep. Denver Butler of Louisville on March 1st.  HB584 is definitely the most strict of the marijuana Bills introduced as it does not provide for a patient to be able to grow their own medicine.  The growing rights would be controlled by “cultivators” who could sell only to manufacturers, processors, or distributors.  As was pointed out in a previous article about this Bill, the way the program would be set up is akin to a Monopoly and should be discouraged.

(LINK TO PDF OF SB 263 HERE)

 

 

RELATED POSTS:

COMPARING THE “CANNABIS ACTS” IN THE KENTUCKY LEGISLATURE…

Kentucky to potientially become buds with bud

Posted by Julia Dake | Jan 28, 2016

Julia Dake, Staff Writer

No pun intended, but I think it’s high time weed became legalized in Kentucky.

Marijuana legalization has made some significant headway over the past few years, now legal for recreational use in four states and medicinal use in 25. Pretty soon another state, namely Kentucky, could be added to the list, either for medicinal and recreational use.

The Cannabis Freedom Act, a bill filed by state Senator Perry B. Clark of Louisville, would repeal Kentucky’s current ban on marijuana and legalize sales to people 21 and over, while those under age 21 could use it with a doctor’s prescription.

Taxes generated from the sale of marijuana would go toward a variety of government programs, including need-based scholarships to Kentucky students pursuing a college degrees. These taxes would also generate revenue for Support Educational Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK), which provides money for Kentucky’s school districts and grants to police departments to purchase gear.

In addition to the fact that we live in the 21st century, the tax revenue would greatly benefit Kentucky students seeking a college education. Tuition costs rise every year, putting college out of reach for some, and further stressing those already enrolled. So given the chance to alleviate some of the financial burden on students, why are some legislators so hesitant?

Legalizing weed would also promote tourism in Kentucky, seeing that we would be the first state on the Eastern seaboard where recreational marijuana would be legal. This would become an added incentive for people visiting our state, and would help the hospitality and tourism industries flourish. Not to mention, the state is ideally suited to grow marijuana. We used to be one of the top hemp producing states, which suggests that we just might be a pretty good at growing its more heady cousin.

Critics of marijuana legalization argue that not enough research has been done and that legalization could lead to the potential for marijuana monopolies, making it difficult to regulate. While these are valid concerns, proponents of the Cannabis Freedom Act have added clauses that would create a three-tier system, preventing any one entity from monopolizing all the facets of marijuana cultivation and sales. Senator Clark insists that marijuana would be regulated exactly like alcohol is, requiring an ID to purchase through licensed dealers.

The bottom line is Kentuckians are using marijuana every day and a lot of money is changing hands. So why not set it up so a portion of that money goes to help the state?

CONTINUE READING…

Kentucky legislature should legalize recreational marijuana

 

EDITORIAL

Kentucky has the opportunity to follow the successful policies of states like Colorado and Oregon by passing the Cannabis Freedom Act to legalize recreational marijuana.

The bill, introduced by state Sen. Perry Clark from Louisville, would effectively legalize recreational marijuana in the Commonwealth and regulate the drug similarly to alcohol, with permission to grow the plant and sell it in retail stores. It would allow use for Kentuckians 21 and over, possession of up to one ounce on one’s person and cultivation of up to five plants. Public use would still be prohibited.

Marijuana legalization is undoubtedly successful in Colorado, where a whole new industry developed because of the cash crop. A report from the Drug Policy Alliance measured the societal effects of legalizing marijuana in Colorado for a one-year period after the drug became legal in January 2014.

Some of the statistics likely surprised many, as the state experienced a decrease in crime rates, a decrease in traffic fatalities, an increase in tax revenue and an increase in jobs and economic output.

In other words, almost everything detractors said would happen did not. The state did not fall into a drug-fueled anarchy; rather, it has experienced a boon in both tourism and industry.

This bill could be the perfect economic opportunity for Kentucky, which is struggling to find a bankable industry as the state’s iconic coal industry experienced major cuts and layoffs in recent years to become a shell of its former self.

Admittedly, the bill likely has very little chance of passing considering recreational marijuana’s low level of support in Kentucky, but medical marijuana is becoming a more likely possibility.

“There’s been some real tear jerking stories told by people who have to go to great lengths and risk being charged with a crime in order to get marijuana to treat some disease or affliction,” said associate professor and Courier-Journal veteran Al Cross.

During last year’s gubernatorial debate at EKU, then Republican candidate Matt Bevin said that if a bill legalizing medical marijuana were to reach his desk, he would sign it into law.

In 2014, the Kentucky General Assembly approved the prescribing of cannabis oil by doctors at the University of Kentucky and University of Louisville.

If the bill passes, Kentucky will become the fifth state, along with the District of Columbia, to pass an initiative legalizing recreational marijuana.

opinions@kykernel.com

CONTINUE READING…

My reply to the "Opinion" From December 30, 2015 or "pot Should Stay Illegal In Kentucky"…

Above:  Mary Thomas-Spears talks with Sen. Perry Clark at the “Comfy Tree Symposium” in Louisville in 2014

To:  Bowling Green Daily News,

         813 College Street
        P.O. Box 90012
       Bowling Green, KY 42102

Website Link

Opinions:  “Pot should stay illegal in Kentucky”

From:  Rev. Mary L. Thomas-Spears, Bowling Green, Kentucky  42101

Dear “Pot should stay illegal in Kentucky”,

That was all like a bad scene straight out of Reefer Madness, or the equivalent of BS propaganda.  Yet all very well said for a pot dealer???!

I couldn’t help but notice you did not bother to take the time to sign your name or to take any credit for that medieval excrement – Your opinion which you felt so valuable.  It would cut into your profit margin if you had to suddenly become legitimate, wouldn’t it?

If Marijuana/Pot/Cannabis Prohibition was repealed in Kentucky and/or the U.S. it would put the pot dealer in the Black Market out of business and you wouldn’t be working for the FDA’s DEA anymore.

After all, Congress was only given authority over Currency, Foreign War and the market place, which is why they created “Prohibition”, to control and divide the market place, in order to maximize their profit margins, through supply and demand, and the Black Market they claim to be fighting against while in essence owning it.  So you work for them, right?

Opinions like yours are in fact, proof, that “opinions are like a$$holes…   They are undeniable evidence of the disgusting amount of (or level of) illiteracy and mis-education, or as Dr. Gupta put it, “brainwashing”, on the highest levels, within and outside of the Commonwealth, in my opinion.

We can thank William Randolf Hearst and his desire to print the news on wooden paper, as he owned millions of acres of trees for creating the propaganda and printing it on to begin with, and all these years later, despite all the published facts, research, science and truth to the contrary of this Marijuana Madness propaganda, we can thank you for attempting to continue the BS.

After all, up until then all of our news was printed on Hemp (= Cannabis Sativa L = Marijuana).

I am sure if my friend, colleague, mentor and Attorney, Gatewood Galbraith were here today in the flesh he would agree with me on everything I have said or will say.  While adding a few colorful comments or opinions of his own, of course,  like,

“I wish all you would stop getting high long enough to read my book!”  “I’d even give you a free copy so that you might educate yourselves on the fact that Marijuana is already legal, as I explained to Greg Stumbo!”

It all comes down to understanding the words and their legal meanings, the Constitution and your Rights and Freedoms along with precedence of Rulings handed down by the Supreme Court like Leary vs. The United States,  as I explained in “Last Free Man in America meets the synthetic subversions”.

In his book he also explains that ending Marijuana Prohibition in Kentucky would save the Commonwealth approximately $500 Million Dollars and year, just in healthcare and related costs alone.

The actual figures coming in from other States who have already passed similar laws are in fact very favorable as well as being in support of Gatewood’s estimate or prediction.

Gatewood Galbraith also explains in his book that Marijuana, like Ibogaine (which is also prohibited in the U.S.), is known to, in fact, break addiction.  Evidence that Y(our) Government is not against addiction or are not fighting addiction as them claim they are.

After all, the market place functions on supply and demand and addiction fuels or increases the demand, therefore increasing the profits.  This is why they have prohibited both of these plants in the U.S.  As former President Bush said without a flinch “We are a Nation addicted to gasoline”.  So why haven’t they prohibited possession of gasoline?  After all, how many have died throughout the last year alone huffing it or consuming it?  Or as a result of crashes?

Yet, it is a controlled substance like Marijuana, controlled through taxation, which recognizes the substance as legal and through the Tax with which it is controlled under (= 1937 Marijuana Tax Act), did just that (legalize), despite it having been repealed by Leary v. United States, in the Supreme Court, on the Federal level, in a ruling that agreed that He (= We, have a divine, inalienable, sovereign, natural right and freedom to utilize Marijuana), (Marijuana = Cannabis Sativa L “untaxed”).

The Commonwealth of Kentucky has passed its own Marijuana Tax Stamp Laws – Legalizing thru taxation.

WHY??? Why would people of any State pass a law, or vote in a law to pay the State or a Commonwealth to tax them for a right or freedom that has already been granted to them by not only Divine authority but by the highest Court in the land on the highest level?  While basically declaring themselves as Federal informants to a Government who has already abused it’s power and authority by passing not one, but two illegal and unconstitutional Acts of Congress (= the CSA or Controlled Substance Act).

All of this is a part of the “Synthetic Subversion” or war on plants and nature (not just Marijuana), as Corporations like Monsanto and Dupont scramble to own ALL OF THE SEED through Patents and GMO’s (genetically modified organism).

For all of those who still believe that Marijuana (= Cannabis Sativa L) was only prohibited because they couldn’t Patent the plant – Your wrong!  You have forgotten about the Corn, Soy Beans, and Wheat as well as all the farm’s and Farmer’s who have been lost to Lawsuits and suicides connected to “who is growing who’s seed in who’s fields throughout the U.S. and Canada.

The main reason for prohibition is all the legal lies (= Legalization)which openly mandates and sanctions their authority to prohibit in the first place, allowing them to Patent and own all the rights, while controlling the market place, which they now own, or rule, therefore controlling all of the profits while also allowing them to control the nature of the plant.

Keep in mind, THC is the active part of the plant that causes a plant to be labeled as Marijuana, which is also the natural sunscreen of any Cannabis Sativa L plant.

HEMP, which starts out as Cannabis Sativa L in the wild, has now been legally defined by the amount of THC it contains (or doesn’t contain).  This seed can now be controlled with a THC stopper gene, via GMO and we can promise that an entire crop growing in any field, no matter how much sunlight it receives, will, for that season, remain HEMP in the field, no matter where the field is, thus, controlling the harvest.   (In nature, the amount of Sunlight a plant receives determines the amount of THC in any given Cannabis Sativa L plant).

Keep in mind, Cannabis Sativa L., blows in the wind like corn when it pollinates.

By moving all of the Marijuana grows indoors, these same chemical Companies and Corporations that have prohibited Cannabis/Marijuana in the first place through the lobby of Congress, are the same ones that supply big Pharma, are the same ones that make chemical weapons for war, are the same ones controlling our crops and food supply, and can NOW not only control all the seed, they can sell you chemical fertilizers and growing equipment for medical Cannabis, for just long enough to gain all the information they need to take over the medical use of Cannabis.

Look at Canada.  Where medical patients have lost all their growing rights, while waiting in lines and waiting for “approval” for medicine that they cannot afford to buy from the Corporate growers!

First:  Cannabis is already legal, as I have pointed out,

Second:  Prohibition is the problem,

Thirdly:  REPEAL is the only legal answer to end prohibition of Cannabis that is morally correct.

Fourth:  the gateway drug theory is a lie and has been disproven and  has been dispelled by the National Academy of Science over a decade ago in the 1999 report published by the National Academy Press, “Marijuana: Assessing the Science Base“, which stated plainly when examining this question or theory that, if there are any gateway drugs leading to addiction they would be sugar, nicotine and alcohol.  Notice that Marijuana is not at the top of their list of gateway drugs for addiction, and that sugar is not on the Controlled Substance list despite all the disease, illness, and death it causes, not including the addiction.

There has never been a death caused by Marijuana consumption or overdose unless it was a result of it being prohibited (= being shot by a Cop)…  Please find me ONE, I challenge you!

Cannabis Sativa L. (= Marijuana Cannabis/Hemp) is a FOOD first.  It has been proven that we are all Endocannabinoid based life forms, and that Endocannabinoids are passed from Mother to Child in the Breast Milk.

However, this food has been prohibited from our gardens since basically 1937, while disease and illness caused by malnutrition grows out of control.  Yet, the FDA wants YOU to believe that this food is a DRUG.

Well, so is bottled water, so do you want to see a Doctor for a prescription to buy bottled water?

I hear that my friend, Senator Perry Clark, has introduced a new bill that will repeal prohibition of Marijuana in Kentucky.  I have not read the Kentucky “Cannabis Freedom ActBill thoroughly yet.  If Sen. Perry Clark has asked to repeal Cannabis prohibition in Kentucky then he deserves our full support!  Our State Representatives need to step up and do what we have paid them to do and additionally introduce KCHHI (Kentucky Cannabis Hemp Health Initiative) as a companion Bill alongside Sen. Perry Clark’s Bill and PROTECT the People of this State!

Both would REPEAL Cannabis prohibition in Kentucky.

Wake up!  Educate yourselves on the entire truth of how it all does affect you, no matter who you are or what you think you know or believe.  This is the twenty-first Century, the “Information Age”!

Sincerely,

Rev. Mary Thomas-Spears

Please be advised that Rev. Mary Thomas-Spears hand delivered a written copy of this letter to the office of the Bowling Green Daily News on 1/5/2016.  To date, it has NOT been published on their website.

SOURCE LINKS:

http://www.bgdailynews.com/opinion/our_opinion/pot-should-stay-illegal-in-ky/article_fededd94-f296-548c-a9cf-f836e7a78bc9.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1jB7RBGVGk

http://www.canorml.org/cbd.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Randolph_Hearst

http://www.hemphasis.net/Paper/paper.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gatewood_Galbraith

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/last-free-man-in-america-gatewood-galbraith/1121786171

http://ibogaine.mindvox.com/

http://www.cnn.com/2006/POLITICS/01/31/sotu.energy/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marihuana_Tax_Act_of_1937

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leary_v._United_States

http://www.somerset-kentucky.com/opinion/editorials/every-day-is-tax-day-kentucky-s-dope-tax/article_4a216cb6-d3a2-5cd7-8dde-4625f1d70f85.html

http://www.monsanto.com/newsviews/pages/why-does-monsanto-sue-farmers-who-save-seeds.aspx

https://www.rt.com/news/206787-monsanto-india-farmers-suicides/

http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2009-09/scientists-find-thc-gene-hemp

http://gmo-awareness.com/all-about-gmos/gmo-defined/

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/THC

http://sensiseeds.com/en/blog/canada-despite-new-rules-cannabis-patients-can-still-grow-home/

http://www.democratsagainstunagenda21.com/who-funds-un-agenda-21.html

http://dailycaller.com/2014/12/05/prohibition-repeal-is-a-good-model-for-marijuana-legalization/

http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/sourcefiles/IOM_Report.pdf

http://www.ratical.org/renewables/hempseed1.html

http://www.beyondthc.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/eCBSystemLee.pdf

http://search.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/texis/search/?dropXSL=&pr=Prod-static-walk&prox=page&rorder=500&rprox=500&rdfreq=500&rwfreq=500&rlead=500&sufs=2&order=r&rdepth=0&query=marijuana&submit=Search

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/legislator/s037.htm

http://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2016/01/12/update-16-rs-br-161-has-become-sb-13-kentucky-cannabis-freedom-act/

http://www.lrc.ky.gov/record/16RS/SB13/bill.pdf

http://www.constitutionalcannabis.com/kchhi.html

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009087183261