Randy Moore interviews candidate for KY Gov. John Hicks

Web Exclusive: Randy Moore interviews candidate for KY Gov. John Hicks

By Randy Moore | August 28, 2019 at 4:18 PM CDT – Updated August 28 at 4:18 PM

OWENSBORO, Ky. (WFIE) – We now have 14 News web exclusive interviews with all three candidates in the race for Kentucky Governor.

You know about Republican Governor Matt Bevin and Democrat Attorney General Andy Beshear, but you might not know much about Libertarian candidate John Hicks.

Hicks lives on the west side of Louisville. He is an I.T. specialist with experience as a public school teacher and community newspaper publisher and editor.

Hicks met with Randy Moore at the 14 News Owensboro studio.

He says with polarization going on with the Republican and Democrat parties, now is the the perfect time for the emergence of the Libertarian Party.

“The two party system just basically pits people against each other. It divides you up into two groups and makes you hate on each other. And that’s a way to keep people distracted so the powers that be that control these parties get their work done. I think people are beginning to see that and that’s why they are coming to the Libertarian Party,” said Hicks.

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KENTUCKY LIBERTARIAN PARTY THIS LINK

PLEASE JOIN US NOW AND BE THE CHANGE FOR KENTUCKY!  WE NEED SOMEONE WHO CARES ABOUT US, NOT THEIR BANK ACCOUNTS AND SPECIAL INTERESTS!  THIS MAY BE THE LAST CHANCE WE HAVE TO GET THIS RIGHT!  DON’T LET ANOTHER DEMOCRAT OR REPUBLICAN SET US UP FOR FAILURE AGAIN!  DON’T BELIEVE THE LIES!

These marijuana cases will no longer be prosecuted by the Jefferson County (KY) attorney

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Joe Sonka, Louisville Courier Journal Published 9:15 a.m. ET Aug. 28, 2019

Possession of a small amount of marijuana will no longer be prosecuted in Jefferson County when that is the only or primary charge, the county attorney’s office will announce Wednesday.

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell is expected to detail the new strategy at a 10 a.m. news conference, according to a source with knowledge of the situation.

The policy will call for his office to no longer prosecute possession of marijuana cases involving one ounce or less, so long as that is the only charge or the most serious charge against the defendant.

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office also will decline to prosecute cases involving possession of drug paraphernalia when that is clearly only used for marijuana consumption.

Is CBD oil legal?: Here’s everything you need to know about CBD oil in Kentucky

However, the new policy will not affect marijuana cases involving trafficking, cultivation, driving under the influence, public consumption or intoxication.

O’Connell is expected defend the policy as a means to find the most efficient use of his office’s limited resources and work toward equal enforcement of laws along racial lines, citing statistics showing that black individuals are disproportionately arrested for marijuana possession compared to white individuals.

A Courier Journal investigation of 21,607 marijuana possession cases in 2017 found that African Americans accounted for two-thirds of those charged, with black drivers cited for possession at six times the rate of white people.

This disparity on marijuana charges along racial lines occurs despite national studies showing that both groups smoke marijuana at roughly the same rate.

Check out: Central Kentucky – and possibly Southern Indiana – is getting a CBD oil production

In June, Louisville Metro Council passed an ordinance by a 15-9 vote making arrests for possession of half an ounce or less of marijuana the lowest law enforcement priority for officers.

Kentucky statutes classify marijuana possession as a misdemeanor punishable by up to 45 days in jail and a $250 fine, though a law passed in 2012 allows individuals to have such charges voided from their record after 60 days.

This story will be updated.

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Libertarian candidate enters Kentucky governor’s race

Libertarian Party of Kentucky

Billy Kobin, Louisville Courier Journal Published 2:12 p.m. ET May 14, 2019 | Updated 2:48 p.m. ET May 14, 2019

After a federal judge temporarily blocked a new section of a state law related to filing deadlines, a Libertarian Party candidate has officially joined the 2019 race to become Kentucky’s next governor.

John Hicks officially became a candidate Monday, according to the Kentucky Secretary of State’s office.

Hicks is a Louisville native and information technology consultant who made a bid to represent the 43rd District in the Kentucky House of Representatives in November. He lost the race to Democrat Charles Booker.

Hicks, 72, is also a U.S. Army veteran who served in Vietnam, and he previously taught in Jefferson County Public Schools and published a community newspaper in Fern Creek.

The Libertarian candidate’s running mate is Ann Cormican, a native of Paris, Kentucky, who works at the Toyota Kentucky manufacturing facility in Georgetown. 

Cormican also made an unsuccessful bid last November to represent the 72nd District in the Kentucky House of Representatives.

The pair almost failed to make it on the statewide ballot in Kentucky’s gubernatorial race.

State legislators approved a measure, House Bill 114, in March that retroactively moved up the filing deadline for third-party and independent candidates from April 1 to January 11.

More: Kentucky lawmakers vote to limit the secretary of state’s power

Hicks said he had filed his candidacy before April 1 but after the January deadline.

The Libertarian Party of Kentucky took the matter to federal court, arguing the measure denied its candidates access to the statewide ballot in 2019.

On May 9, a U.S. District Court judge in Covington agreed and temporarily blocked the section of the state law related to filing deadlines.

Fixing a “broken electoral system” and not “controlling the private life” of Kentuckians are among the Libertarian ticket’s priorities, Hicks told the Courier Journal.

An instant runoff system for elections is one electoral reform that Hicks said could benefit Kentucky.

“I think we’re going to be the moderate party,” Hicks said. “We’re certainly in a position where we can work with members of both major parties in the Legislature.”

Ann Cormican

Ann Cormican (Photo: Provided by John Hicks)

Hicks and Cormican already won the Libertarian Party’s state primary back in March, meaning they will appear on ballots in November. (The Libertarian Party is not included in the May 21 primary involving Republican and Democratic candidates.)

Hicks said he is agrees with many of Gov. Matt Bevin’s policies but is “skeptical” of the incumbent’s policies of “subsidizing private industry” and trying to intervene in “moral matters.”

And Bevin’s criticism of those he disagrees with also concerns Hicks.

“A lot of Gov. Bevin’s policies have been right on,” Hicks said. “But his rhetoric has been terrible.”

Reach Billy Kobin at bkobin@courierjournal.com or 502-582-7030. Support strong local journalism by subscribing today: courier-journal.com/subscribe.

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(KY) Please Call Your Legislators!

ky 2019

To ALL Kentucky Citizens,

The time is now to contact your Legislators concerning the Cannabis Bills, and any other Bills which you are concerned about!  The phone number to call is:

1-800-372-7181

Here are the current Cannabis Bills:

SB 80 / Dan Malano Seum / Establishes the “Department of Cannabis Control” which will oversee lawful consumption of Cannabis in Kentucky by adults 21 and over.

HB 136 / Establishes a very strict “Medical Cannabis” bill for bonified Patients.

SB 83 / Perry B. Clark “Shauna’s Law”  Relating to a drug free workplace / Seeks to mandate an appeals process for those employer’s who enforce drug-testing upon their employee’s which will address those persons who have been found in violation of the drug-free workplace policy by testing positive on random drug screens for legal Hemp products such as CBD. It would set aside that violation if proven that a legal product had been used.

SB 82 / J. Higdon / to make the penalty for possession of a personal use quantity of marijuana a prepayable non-criminal fine;

SB 57 / J. Higdon / to allow discretionary expungement of Class D felonies with a ten-year waiting period;

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https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2019/01/13/kentucky-will-march-to-the-capital-once-again/