The Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet and Operation UNITE are launching a new substance abuse call center that will connect people across the state with drug treatment, Gov. Matt Bevin announced today

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Woody Maglinger
502-564-2611
Woody.Maglinger@ky.gov

*Correction: The helpline will go live on Dec. 1, 2017.

Gov. Matt Bevin, Justice Cabinet and Operation UNITE Unveil New Drug Treatment Helpline

The KY Help Call Center will connect people with resources statewide

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Nov. 17, 2017) – The Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet and Operation UNITE are launching a new substance abuse call center that will connect people across the state with drug treatment, Gov. Matt Bevin announced today.

Beginning Dec. 1, Kentuckians struggling with a substance use disorder, either themselves or within their families, can call 1-833-8KY-HELP (1-833-859-4357) toll-free to speak with a specialist about treatment options and available resources. The specialist will conduct a brief screening assessment in order to connect callers with the most relevant treatment services as quickly as possible.

“This epidemic is gripping people in every corner of our state and every part of our society,” said Gov. Bevin. “If people don’t know about the ability to get help, then help is not going to be given to people. This phone number will connect callers to a live person who understands this exact issue and will link them to community resources that can help.”

Operation UNITE already fields about 1,000 inquiries each month from desperate residents seeking help with a substance use disorder. The new KY Help Call Center will provide referrals across the state to both public and private treatment providers.

Options will include everything from medication-assisted treatment to faith-based care, and the live specialist will help callers work through all the variables, such as location and cost.

“There are so many people across the commonwealth who have nowhere to turn when confronted with their own addiction or that of a loved one,” said Nancy Hale, President/CEO of Operation UNITE. “They are desperate for answers. They are desperate for help. This call center will guide people toward recovery. It will give them hope.”

The partnership with Operation UNITE is the latest initiative in the state’s “Don’t Let Them Die” campaign. Gov. Bevin unveiled that campaign earlier this year, encouraging all Kentuckians to take proactive steps to combat the lethal opioid crisis, which claimed more than 1,400 lives in 2016.

Kentucky Justice Secretary John Tilley said those in the grip of addiction often have brief moments of clarity when they are most receptive to help.

“We must seize on those rare opportunities to save lives,” Secretary Tilley said. “This call center brings us closer to on-demand treatment than ever before, and it allows callers to locate the resources that work best for them. The bottom line is that recovery happens, and I’m grateful that our state is leading the charge against this national pandemic.”

UNITE is staffing the KY Help Call Center with specialists in Prestonsburg, Ky., and the Kentucky Justice Cabinet is funding it through anti-drug appropriations in the current budget — approximately $500,000 per year for the next two years.

Callers can speak to a specialist from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (ET), Monday through Friday. During non-business hours, callers may leave a message and the call center staff will get back in touch with them.

More information is available at DontLetThemDie.com and OperationUNITE.org.

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In chaotic scene, Rand Paul demands to see the House GOP’s Obamacare repeal bill

By Lauren Fox and Phil Mattingly, CNN

Updated 3:25 PM ET, Thu March 2, 2017

Rand Paul 3.2.17

Senator demands to see ‘secret’ Obamacare bill 01:59

Story highlights
  • Some House Republicans were being granted a chance to review an Obamacare repeal draft
  • GOP leadership has taken a new level of caution with their Obamacare legislation

(CNN)  Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul marched to the House side of the Capitol Thursday morning, knocked on a locked door and demanded to see a copy of the House’s bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which he believed was being kept under lock and key.

Aides in the room told the senator — before dozens of reporters in a crowded hallway — that there was no bill to see. In fact, it wasn’t the room where GOP members of the Energy and Commerce Committee were told to meet with staff to review the current draft of their bill at all. But that did little to dissuade Paul, openly critical to the House Republican leadership’s preferred path on the process, from making his underlying point.

“This should be an open and transparent process,” Paul said. “This is being presented as if it were a national secret, as if this was a plot to invade another country, as if this were national security. That’s wrong.”

    Paul ventured to the House Thursday afternoon after reports surfaced that House Republicans on the Energy and Commerce Committee were being granted an opportunity to review the current draft of the Obamacare repeal legislation and ask questions behind closed doors.

    Opposed to the House legislation’s principles, Paul said he wanted to see the bill himself even though he didn’t serve on the committee.

    “I’m not allowed to read the working product so I can comment on it?” he said.

    Outside the small House office, the chaotic scene continued with a handful of Democrats demanding they, too, see the legislation, which aides continued to say was not even in the room. Two Democrats on the Energy and Commerce Committee and House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, a Democrat from Maryland, asked aides if the bill was ready, only to be rebuffed.

    “I want to see the bill. I want to read the bill,” New York Democrat Paul Tonko said, noting that as far as he knew, Republicans were still planning to move forward with a markup on the legislation next week.

    At one point, the GOP staff allowed Hoyer, Rep. Joe Kennedy and a dozen or so reporters into the room to inspect it themselves. It was, in fact, bill-less.

    Hoyer proceeded to hold an impromptu news conference near a bust of President Abraham Lincoln a few feet away from the misidentified room. He then held an imaginary conversation with the 16th president about what Hoyer said was the poor state of the Republican Party.

    Rep. Greg Walden, the chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, downplayed perceptions of secrecy in a statement Thursday.

    “Reports that the Energy and Commerce Committee is doing anything other than the regular process of keeping its members up to speed on latest developments in its jurisdictions are false. Simply put, Energy and Commerce majority members and staff are continuing to discuss and refine draft legislative language on issues under our committee’s jurisdiction.”

    Leadership has taken a new level of caution with Obamacare repeal and replace reconciliation drafts after a leaked version of the bill in progress was circulated to news outlets last week.

    House aides told CNN that the review process was simply part of regular procedure of giving their members an opportunity to review the current draft and ask committee staff questions. The committee — along with a second panel responsible for the repeal legislation — is tentatively shooting to consider their respective pieces of legislation as soon as next week.

    The leaked draft — which aides say was outdated — drew condemnations from conservatives who pledged to oppose any final bill and set off a new round of internal divisions that threatened to endanger the repeal process before it even gets off the ground.

    CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO…

    In Depressed Rural Kentucky, Worries Mount Over Medicaid Cutbacks

     

    November 19, 20166:00 AM ET

    Phil Galewitz

     

    For Freida Lockaby, an unemployed 56-year-old woman who lives with her dog in an aging mobile home in Manchester, Ky., one of America’s poorest places, the Affordable Care Act was life altering.

    The law allowed Kentucky to expand Medicaid in 2014 and made Lockaby – along with 440,000 other low-income state residents – newly eligible for free health care under the state-federal insurance program. Enrollment gave Lockaby her first insurance in 11 years.

    “It’s been a godsend to me,” said the former Ohio school custodian who moved to Kentucky a decade ago.

    Lockaby finally got treated for a thyroid disorder that had left her so exhausted she’d almost taken root in her living room chair. Cataract surgery let her see clearly again. A carpal tunnel operation on her left hand eased her pain and helped her sleep better. Daily medications brought her high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol level under control.

    But Lockaby is worried her good fortune could soon end. Her future access to health care now hinges on a controversial proposal to revamp the program that her state’s Republican governor has submitted to the Obama administration.

    Next year will likely bring more uncertainty when a Trump administration and a GOP-controlled Congress promise to consider Obamacare’s repeal, including a potential reduction in the associated Medicaid expansion in 31 states and the District of Columbia that has led to health coverage for an estimated 10 million people.

    What Happens If Kentucky Dismantles Its Health Insurance Exchange?

    Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, who was elected in 2015, has argued his state can’t afford Medicaid in its current form. Obamacare permitted states to use federal funds to broaden Medicaid eligibility to all adults with incomes at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level, now $11,880 for individuals. Kentucky’s enrollment has doubled since late 2013 and today almost a third of its residents are in the program. The Medicaid expansion under Obamacare in Kentucky has led to one of the sharpest drops in any state’s uninsured rate, to 7.5 percent in 2015 from 20 percent two years earlier.

    Kentucky’s achievement owed much to the success of its state-run exchange, Kynect, in promoting new coverage options under the health law. Kynect was launched under Bevin’s Democratic predecessor, Steve Beshear, and dismantled by Bevin this year.

    Bevin has threatened to roll back the expansion if the Obama administration doesn’t allow him to make major changes, such as requiring Kentucky’s beneficiaries to pay monthly premiums of $1 to $37.50 and require nondisabled recipients to work or do community service for free dental and vision care.

    Budget pressures are set to rise next year in the 31 states and the District of Columbia where Medicaid was expanded as the federal government reduces its share of those costs. States will pick up 5 percent next year and that will rise gradually to 10 percent by 2020. Under the health law, the federal government paid the full cost of the Medicaid expansion population for 2014-2016.

    In a state as cash-strapped as Kentucky, the increased expenses ahead for Medicaid will be significant in Bevin’s view — $1.2 billion from 2017 to 2021, according to the waiver request he’s made to the Obama administration to change how Medicaid works in his state.

    Trump’s unexpected victory may help Bevin’s chances of winning approval. Before the election, many analysts expected federal officials to reject the governor’s plan by the end of the year on the grounds that it would roll back gains in expected coverage.

    A Trump administration could decide the matter differently, said Emily Beauregard, executive director of Kentucky Voice for Health, an advocacy group that opposes most waiver changes because they could reduce access to care.

    “I think it’s much more likely that a waiver could be approved under the Trump administration,” she said. “On the other hand, I wonder if the waiver will be a moot point under a Trump administration, assuming that major pieces of the [Affordable Care Act] are repealed.”

    Lockaby is watching with alarm: “I am worried to death about it.”

    Life already is hard in her part of Kentucky’s coal country, where once-dependable mining jobs are mostly gone.

    In Clay County where Lockaby lives, 38 percent of the population live in poverty. A fifth of the residents are disabled. Life expectancy is eight years below the nation’s average.

    Clay’s location places it inside an area familiar to public health specialists as the South’s diabetes and stroke belt. It’s also in the so-called “Coronary Valley” encompassing the 10-state Ohio/Mississippi valley region.

    About 60 percent of Clay County’s 21,000 residents are covered by Medicaid, up from about a third before the expansion. The counties uninsured rate for nonelderly adults has fallen from 29 percent to 10 percent.

    Still, the increase in insurance coverage hasn’t made Clay’s people healthier yet. Local health officials here say achieving that will take a decade or more. Instead, they cite progress in smaller steps: more cancer screenings, more visits to mental health professionals and more prescriptions getting filled. Harder lifestyle changes that are still ahead — such as eating better, quitting smoking and regular exercise — will take more than a couple years to happen, said Aaron Yelowitz, associate professor of economics at the University of Kentucky.

    One hopeful spot is the Grace Community Health Center in downtown Manchester, where patient visits are up more than 20 percent since 2014. Those without insurance pay on a sliding scale, which can mean a visit costs $50 or more.

    That was too much for Ramiro Salazar, 47, who lives with his wife and two children on a $733 monthly income. With Medicaid, he sees a doctor for his foot and ankle pain, meets regularly with a psychologist for anxiety and gets medications — all free to him. Medicaid even covers his transportation costs to doctors, vital because a specialist can be 40 miles away.

    Salazar is worried about Bevin’s plans, especially the additional costs. “I probably couldn’t afford it as I’m unemployed,” he said. “It would hurt me pretty bad.”

    Any development that could take away health coverage from people with mental health issues worries Joan Nantz, a psychologist who works part time at Grace and whose appointment calendar is booked three weeks out because of patient demand. More than 90 percent of her clients are on Medicaid.

    “If something happens to this program, I can’t begin to think what impact it would have on society,” she said. Without counseling, people with mental health issues will resort to illegal drugs and be more likely to commit crimes and domestic violence, Nantz said.

    Just five primary care doctors in Manchester treat adults in Clay and surrounding counties. Manchester Memorial Hospital has tried to recruit more without success.

    “We had a painful primary care shortage here five years ago and now it’s worse,” said Dr. Jeffrey Newswanger, an emergency room physician and chief medical officer at the hospital. “Just because they have a Medicaid card doesn’t mean they have doctors.”

    The emergency room is busier than ever seeing patients for primary care needs, he said.

    Newswanger sees both sides to the debate over Medicaid. The hospital gained because more patients are now covered by insurance, and the ER’s uninsured rate dropped to 2 percent from 10 percent in 2013.

    “Eliminating the expansion altogether would be painful for the hospital and a disaster for the community,” he said.

    But, Newswanger also appreciates some of Bevin’s proposals.

    “No one values something that they get for free,” he said, and incentives are needed to make people seek care in doctors’ offices instead of expensive ERs.

    Christie Green, public health director of the Cumberland Valley District Health Department that covers Clay County, said making the poor pay more or scrapping Medicaid’s expansion would be a setback to improving people’s health.

    Last year, Green helped Manchester build a three-mile trail along a park and install a swinging bridge across a small creek. Both additions were intended to promote physical fitness in a place where more than a third smoke — both far above national averages.

    Progress is slow. The path is used regularly. But drug addicts congregate daily by the bridge and it rarely gets traffic.

    “There is a lot to overcome here,” Green said.

    This story was produced through collaboration between NPR and Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization. You can follow Phil Galewitz on Twitter: @philgalewitz.

    CONTINUE READING…

    Proposed Medicaid Changes in Kentucky – Tell us what you think about Governor Bevin’s proposed Medicaid changes

    Proposed Medicaid Changes in Kentucky – Tell us what you think about Governor Bevin’s proposed Medicaid changes – LINK

    PLEASE FOLLOW LINK ABOVE TO COMPLETE THIS IMPORTANT SURVEY!  YOUR HEALTHCARE IS AT RISK IN KENTUCKY!  NOW IS THE TIME TO SPEAK UP!

     


     

    United 874K Members and Supporters –
    The three public hearings on the proposed Medicaid waiver have been completed, with approximately 400 individuals in attendance in Bowling Green, Frankfort and Hazard, KY and nearly 100 individuals who spoke. 98% of those who spoke expressed concerns about the proposed waiver. Concerns were expressed about requiring the “medically frail” to pay monthly premiums; about a work or volunteer requirement of 20 hours/week for those on the Medicaid Expansion; loss of retroactive eligibility which could cause a lapse in coverage or a delay in beginning Medicaid coverage; increasing premiums over several years for some Medicaid members, with a 6-month lock-out from services if the premium is not paid; eliminating annual dental and vision check-ups and routine care for the Medicaid Expansion folks
    Clearly those Medicaid members who are deemed to be “medically frail” (by a process yet to be determined, but ostensibly those with SMI. Chronic SUD, complicated medical conditions, are on SSI, or have a disability that interferes with a task of daily living) will be charged a monthly premium, probably in the range of $1 – $8 / month. We are concerned both by the financial burden, but also by the administrative burden created by this requirement. If the premium is not paid, then the medically frail individual will have to pay a copay for every service and every medication! While the 1915 C Waivers are exempt from this current 1115 Waiver Proposal from the Administration, we are concerned about individuals who are currently covered by Medicaid while waiting for a 1915 waiver slot. They would likely be classified as “medically frail” and would be subject to a monthly premium; if not paid, then they would be charged a copay for each health service and each medication they receive.
    Medically frail individuals will not have a work or volunteer requirement and will have the full range of current benefits, including dental and vision. These latter benefits (annual check-up, routine cleanings, etc.) are being removed from the benefit package for all other Medicaid members (excluding children and pregnant women); those basic health benefits will have to be “earned” by the member through their Rewards Account.
    I urge you to spread the word and to encourage those affected by these waiver changes, their families, providers and advocates to submit comments! I am available to answer questions or to be of assistance, if you will contact me.
    I have attached a flyer which gives information about writing or emailing your comments about the waiver to Medicaid Commissioner Miller. THE DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF WRITTEN COMMENTS IS 5:00 P.M. ON FRIDAY, JULY 22, 2016! Volume is important, so please encourage everyone to write in. And send a copy of your comment to kymedicaidchanges@gmail.com so we can be sure that your voice is heard!
    I have also attached a brief description of the waiver proposal and how it would affect various groups of people who are now Medicaid members.
    KY Voices for Health is conducting a very short SURVEY about the proposed changes in Medicaid. Please distribute this link and ask folks to complete the survey! It takes less than 3-4 minutes.

    UK gets $6 million grant to research cocaine addiction

    Saturday, November 21, 2015 

     

    Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2015 12:22 AM

    By Linda B. Blackford Lexington Herald-Leader

    LEXINGTON – A group of University of Kentucky researchers has won a $6 million grant to further develop a potential treatment for cocaine abuse.

    UK College of Pharmacy professor Chang-Guo Zhan, along with UK professors Fang Zheng and Sharon Walsh, and Wake Forest University professor Mei-Chuan Ko, are researching new therapies for overdose and addiction.

    “Dr. Zhan’s groundbreaking work in this field cannot be overstated,” interim dean Kelly M. Smith said. “There currently is no FDA approved treatment for cocaine overdose or cocaine addiction, and Dr. Zhan and his research team are trying to change that. Developing such therapies would be a major breakthrough for health care.”

    Previously, Zhan’s team designed and tested CocH1, an enzyme that breaks down cocaine in the bloodstream without producing harmful byproducts in the body.

    CONTINUE READING…

    A summary of two doctors

     

    IMG_20150912_102933The KASPER REPORTING SYSTEM IN KENTUCKY

    is reeking havoc on many peoples lives including but not limited to the unfortunate souls who may find themselves in need of this medication.

    After House Bill 1 was passed in Kentucky most of the Physicians who were prescribing these medications “duck and ran”.  It did not matter if you were on it for a legitimate reason or if you got it filled to “enjoy” or maybe even to “barter” with, you would no longer be “served”.

    At first I thought it was only the people who smoked cannabis who were being targeted.  While it is true that “cannabis abusers” were a primary target, in fact it affected all patients who must use a narcotic for pain or anxiety issues.

    An unnamed Psychiatrist told me that the law as it is written DOES NOT prevent him from prescribing the medication “xanax”, however, he chooses not to prescribe it to his patients.  It just has to be properly documented he told me.  Then I asked him if he had ever been investigated by the DEA and he said that he had not.  Maybe that is because he chooses not to prescribe narcotic medication?   There is much more money to be made off of prescribing the SSRI’s and they are handed out like orange juice at breakfast every day to millions of people, including children, even though there is documented evidence against it’s use.  But that is okay because “it isn’t a narcotic”…  Even so there is a severe withdrawal from the SSRI’s as well as there is “narcotics”.  Some are worse than others but any kind of psychological medication is going to make you dependent upon it, if it works at all. 

    A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (link is external)says that SSRI’s like Paxil and Prozac are no more effective in treating depression than a placebo pill.

    I contacted another Doctor’s office for an appointment with an MD and before I could even tell the office clerk my name she asked me if I had ever been prescribed narcotic medications in the past or was I using them now?  When I asked her why she was asking me this she replied that if I was, the Doctor would not see me because “he already had several patients” in his practice that he prescribed for and he could not see anymore.

    Okay!

    The whole theory behind any mental (narcotic) medication is to alter your state of mind.  Therefore, it must be a given that when you cut hundreds, even thousands off medication that they have been dependent upon to maintain some clarity in their life, that their mindset can become open to immediate and sometimes dangerous thoughts. 

    A lot of these people are not privileged to have “Cannabis” available at all times to use as medication or for replacement.  They cannot afford to buy narcotics on the street and that being said there isn’t much there anymore. 

    Heroin seems to be becoming the new mainstream “street drug”.  It is cheap, it gets you high, it will take away the pain or anxiety (for a moment at least) and you don’t have to depend on a Physician to prescribe it, a pharmacy to fill it, or the DEA to accuse you of Doctor shopping for it .  

    The problem with that is that Heroin kills.   And it works pretty damn fast. 

    Heroin surges as Kentucky cracks down on pain pills

    Heroin deaths have climbed exponentially as pain pill addicts look for new high

    SPECIAL REPORT BY LAURA UNGAR AND CHRIS KENNING | The Courier-Journal | Story by Laura Ungar

    One could theorize that the passage of HB50 which included a provision to “provide funding for the purchase and administration of naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension”,   for Heroin overdoses was a calculated response to what they knew was going to happen when they discontinued “narcotics” at the Doctor’s office…more Heroin deaths.   Per the Interim Joint Committee on Judiciary on July 27, 2015…

    Minutes of the 2nd Meeting of the 2015 Interim

    July 27, 2015

    The mandatory use of KASPER has resulted in three things: overall decreased prescribing of controlled substances, decreased inappropriate prescribing, and decreased “doctor shopping”. All three of these were goals of the bill, and all three have been successfully achieved. House Bill 217 was passed a year later, which cleaned up some parts of House Bill 1 and married the regulations to the statutory provisions. Representative Tilley asked members to note that those who are prescribing in high quantities are being monitored. Statistics have shown that since the passage of House Bill 1, heroin use increased. There has been an increase in heroin-related deaths.

    Link:  http://www.lrc.ky.gov/LRCSiteSessionSearch/dtSearch/dtisapi6.dll?cmd=getdoc&DocId=752229&Index=E%3a\dtsearch_indexes\LRC_WebSite&HitCount=2&hits=11a+123+&SearchForm=

    However, HB50 has still not been passed and as of this day, HB50 still sits in the “House” where it has been since January 6th of this year I am assuming that no one has reaped the benefits of an emergency “administration of naltrexone for extended-release injectable suspension”, as a component of substance abuse treatment programs”… and how many have died in the past year from Heroin? That is like putting the Cart before the Horse, isn’t it?  We have more people on Heroin than ever before and at the same time people who require “Scheduled medications” for treatment do not have access to them.  No Physician is going to risk their license being taken away just because you have pain or anxiety problems. 

    Furthermore, KRS 218A.172 specifies :

    (6)
    Any person who violates the provisions of this section shall be guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.
    Effective: June 24, 2015 History: Amended  2015  Ky.  Acts  ch.  33,  sec.  1,  effective  June  24,  2015.

    In fact, the suppression of legally available narcotic drugs has done nothing more than aggravate an already out of control problem causing death when there was no reason to cause death. “First do no harm” is supposed to be the rule of the day…Well, it seems that idea just went to hell because they are now effectively creating a genocide of sorts. 

    Does anyone out there think it may have been planned to happen this way? 

    After being without medication for about four months now I am seeing where I was not addicted to it per say, I was dependent upon it because of my illnesses which I have been dealing with for over thirty years.  Since “quitting” my medication I have had continuing problems with acute anxiety on a daily basis, weight gain, loss of ability to physically maneuver as well i.e., walking and sitting causes a lot of pain and I find myself being able to walk shorter and shorter distances, RLS symptoms with inability to sleep normally which can cause too much sleeping or staying awake, constant worrying, more depressed, general disgust for the world at large.  I cannot afford “street drugs” even if I wanted them and I also cannot afford to maintain myself on Cannabis.  So where does that leave those  persons who are like myself?   I have been offered a list of “non scheduled” drugs, all of them I had tried before and had caused a problem and/or came with “Black Box Warnings“,  several of which I had been warned NOT to use by other Doctors.

    At this point I am taking one day at a time, waiting on the “Kava” to arrive in the mail.  I do not see myself trusting my needs to any Physician’s RX pad again.  Doctor’s used to have a say in what they prescribed or didn’t prescribe to their patients.  One of those medications included Cannabis RX’s in various forms.  Everything now has to be CONTROLLED!  Especially us. 

    And what better way to do it than to “monitor all of our doctor visits, our medications, impose urine testing and take away (for all practical purposes) the Doctor’s right to prescribe medication and our right to receive it, without intimidation at the same time they continue to push other drugs on us which are known for their ability to inflict death, mental disorders and pain and at the same time they are calling us drug addicts for needing medications?

    Many good products which were sold OTC have been removed from the shelves of our pharmacy.  One of them was Quinine. 

    From 1969 to 1992, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) received 157 reports of health problems related to quinine use, including 23 which had resulted in death. LINK.

    Note that (only) 23 people died over a period of 30+ years from using Quinine before it was removed from the shelves.  How many people have died from SSRI’s?   What about Lipitor?

    We have a new drug to try out that the FDA has approved (for now) for use to treat hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) – a condition characterized by low sexual desire.  This drug works by affecting the brain. 

    By modulating serotonin and dopamine activity in certain parts of the brain, flibanserin may improve the balance between these neurotransmitter systems in the regulation of sexual response. 

    I would suggest that you don’t get to where you ‘like’ it because we don’t know how long we will be allowed to use it!  Probably just long enough to create another baby boom – They need to produce some new slaves.  We are all worn out.

    Informational Links

    The exact cause of substance abuse is not clear, with theories including: a genetic disposition; learned from others – or a habit which if addiction develops, manifests as a chronic debilitating disease.

    The Commonwealth’s Response to Kentucky’s Pill Mill Problem

    Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting (KASPER) system

    House Bill 1 Evaluation Study Results

    Who may request a KASPER report?

    Typical “Consent for treatment” with pain medications

    [NASPER] builds upon the success of existing PDMPS [prescription drug monitoring programs] by encouraging the creation of and bolstering support for state-based, PDMPs through which schedule II, III or IV drugs could be tracked by state regulatory agencies. Through these secure, HIPAA-standard protected databases, physicians would have access to important information regarding their patient’s prescription drug histories. Of great importance, the bill’s interoperability requirements assure that the databases would, for the first time, make possible tracking across state lines by state entities. The availability to physicians of important patient drug information represents a significant step forward in improving patient care and reducing the abuse and misuse of pain-related controlled substances.”

    President Bush’s endorsement of H.R. 1132/S. 518 followed less than a month later.

    The U.S. House and Senate passed by voice vote H.R. 1132/S.518, the National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting (NASPER) Act of 2005. This legislation authorizes $60 million in new federal grants to assist states in creating new programs and expanding existing ones. Supposedly, this legislation is aimed at identifying prescription drug addiction, and treating the abuse. The bill originally was a physician-patient centered, public-health bill but now includes the expanded involvement of law enforcement. Sadly, it allows local, state, and federal agents direct use of this nationwide database of information on every prescription written for U.S. citizens and their pets.  If your dog is prescribed anything that is on the controlled substances list, your name, address, and phone will be entered into this monitoring program.

    As of 2013, Manchikanti is the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians,  founded in Paducah Kentucky in 1998, as well as the Society of Interventional Pain Management Surgery Centers. He is also a member of the Kentucky Carrier Advisory Committee and the Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting Task Force, also known as KASPER.[16] He has also led the effort to establish the National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting (NASPER) Act, which is designed to help with the prescription drug abuse problem by having a central reporting system for doctors and pharmacists to keep track of these prescriptions. In 2005, NASPER was enacted into law, with almost all US states creating their own prescription drug monitoring programs.[17]

    (The Controlled Substances Act-This law is a consolidation of numerous laws regulating the manufacture and distribution of narcotics, stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens, anabolic steroids, and chemicals used in the illicit production of controlled substances.)

    The Commonwealth’s Response to Kentucky’s Pill Mill Problem

    201 KAR 9:270. Professional standards for prescribing or dispensing Buprenorphine-Mono-Product or Buprenorphine-Combined-with-Naloxone

    Finally, the rule contains very specific guidance by KBML relating to the use of urine drug testing in chronic pain management.

    In the ordinary regulation setting the standards for prescribing controlled substances, 201 KAR 9:260, the Board requires that during the course of long-term prescribing or dispensing of controlled substances for the treatment of pain and related symptoms associated with a primary medical complaint, the physician shall utilize urine drug screens in a random manner at appropriate times to determine whether the patient is taking prescribed medications or taking illegal substances or medications not prescribed by the physician.

    As usual you can follow the money…

    The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS) has selected Health Information Designs, LLC (HID) to develop a database that will collect and store prescribing and dispensing data for controlled substances in Schedules II, III, IV, and V and drugs of concern (tramadol).

    In 1999 The Cabinet for Health and Family Services was given the challenge to establish Services was given the challenge to establish a program to fight the rising incidence of the diversion of legal prescription drugs into the diversion of legal prescription drugs into the illegal market.

    US  congressman representing Kentucky’s 5th District secured federal funding to establish Operation UNITE—a nonprofit organization working to rid 32 Kentucky counties of illegal drug use through Unlawful Narcotics Investigations, Treatment and Education (UNITE)

    I’m sure there is more on the money trail but I’m too damn tired to find it!

    sheree

    Opiate Users Needed for Research Studies (Lexington, KY)

    Do you currently use drugs like Lortab, Percocet, Oxycontin, or heroin to get high?

    Researchers at the University of Kentucky are conducting a study to examine the strength and effects of prescription opioids. You may be eligible to participate if you are between the ages of 18 and 50, you have taken opioid drugs intranasally (by snorting them), and you can stop using opioids without feeling sick. Participation will require a 5-6 week inpatient stay. Qualified volunteers will be paid for participation. All information is kept strictly confidential. For a confidential interview to see if you qualify, please call: 1-866-933-4UKY.

    CONTINUE READING…