Those who overdose on heroin or other opioid drugs in Kentucky’s largest population areas would be immediately detained by first responders and taken to a hospital under a bill that has passed the House.

For Immediate Release

March 20, 2018

Opioid overdose bill goes to Senate

FRANKFORT—Those who overdose on heroin or other opioid drugs in Kentucky’s largest population areas would be immediately detained by first responders and taken to a hospital under a bill that has passed the House.

House Bill 428, sponsored by Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, would specifically apply to overdose victims in Lexington, Louisville, or areas like Northern Kentucky where adjoining counties each have populations over 90,000.

Moser, who is the director of the Northern Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy, said the need for the bill was brought to her attention by first responders who she said are often called to resuscitate the same person for opioid overdose multiple times. Moser said there were over 15,100 emergency medical runs requiring resuscitation due to opioid overdoses in Kentucky last year, not counting more than 2,000 runs in Jefferson County alone.

First responders “brought this issue to me because they are unable to get the folks into treatment when they are resuscitated,” said Moser. “These folks wake up and they are able to just get up and walk away and refuse treatment” even though she said they may still be under the influence of drugs.

“They need to get to a hospital for stabilization, referral to treatment and further treatment and this is what this bill seeks to do,” said Moser.

Failure to receive appropriate treatment for opioid overdose often leads to death, with 1,404 deaths from opioid overdose reported in Kentucky in 2016 alone, said Moser.

“Death is a distinct possibility with opioid overdoses,” she said.

HB 428 passed the House on a 92-3 vote. It now goes to the Senate for its consideration.



For Immediate Release

March 21, 2018

Standards-for-treatment disorders bill goes to governor

FRANKFORT— A bill that would attack Kentucky’s opioid crisis through better state substance use disorder treatment and recovery program standards has received final passage in the Kentucky House.

House Bill 124, sponsored by House Health and Family Services Committee Chair Rep. Addia Wuchner, R-Florence, and Rep. Kimberly Poore Moser, R-Taylor Mill, would require enhanced licensure and quality standards for substance use disorder treatment and recovery after a state review of current statewide standards, subject to available funding. Enhanced standards would cover residential, outpatient and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) services, according to the bill.

Wuchner said she has traveled the state visiting treatment and recovery centers and found that some programs have “a lot of dynamics and a lot of differences.”

“That doesn’t mean that every program has to be the same, but there should be components of that program that are consistent with best practices,” said Wuchner.

HB 124 was amended in the Senate on a 36-0 vote late last week to include FDA-approved MAT treatment for inmates who are opioid-dependent or who have other substance abuse disorders.

“As some of those products that are used for medically-assisted treatment come to market and come to bear, there are more products now that could be used in the corrections environment that minimize diversion, and that’s why this piece was added,” said Wuchner.

HB 124 received final passage in the House today on a vote of 93-0. The bill was initially passed in the House on an 85-2 vote in January. 



Proposal for legal medical marijuana held hostage by Kentucky House GOP leadership

Morgan Watkins, Louisville Courier Journal Published 3:20 p.m. ET March 20, 2018

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes says legislation that would legalize medical marijuana is being held hostage by the state House of Representatives’ Republican leadership.

House Bill 166, which is sponsored by a bipartisan group of lawmakers, would let qualifying patients diagnosed with certain health conditions use medical marijuana, although limits would apply to patients and to the people and businesses growing and selling the drug.

The House Judiciary Committee heard testimony on HB 166 earlier this month but decided to pass over the proposal – a move that allows it to reconsider and rule on the matter later on in the 2018 session, which ends in mid-April. But the number of days during which the legislature can pass laws is dwindling.

“House Bill 166 continues to gain bipartisan support. One in four members of the House are now sponsors,” Grimes, a Democrat, wrote Tuesday afternoon in a post on her official Facebook page. “These legislators realize medical cannabis can help save lives and provide new funding to Kentucky so we don’t have to balance budgets on the backs of our teachers and public employees. Yet, GOP House Leadership is holding the bill hostage in the Judiciary Committee.”

Grimes wrote that the bill’s sponsors shouldn’t have to rely on a discharge petition – which can be filed in advance of an attempt to take a bill from a committee – in order to a force a vote on “something an overwhelming majority of Kentuckians support.”

“If the GOP House Leadership refuses to call a vote, constituents are only left to wonder what motivates them to ignore the will of the people,” she wrote.

State Rep. Joe Fischer, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, told Courier Journal the committee’s members already voted on HB 166 when they decided to pass over it.

Fischer said he would talk to committee members but noted that he hasn’t seen any amendments to the original bill, which did not have enough support to get a ‘yes’ vote from the group. As of 5 p.m. Tuesday, HB 166 wasn’t on the agenda for the committee’s Wednesday meeting, according to Fischer.

“I’ve been accused of holding it hostage, but there was a vote on it,” said Fischer, R-Fort Thomas. “Right now … it was to pass over the bill.”

Rep. Jason Nemes, R-Louisville, made the motion to pass over HB 166 on March 7. At the time, he said he wanted to help improve the measure and bring it back for consideration before the session ends. Since then, he has become a sponsor of the bill.

Grimes issued a separate statement last week that said the medical marijuana legislation had been revised. Jaime Montalvo, of the nonprofit organization Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana, said he has been working with sponsors of HB 166 and a substitute version of the bill is ready.

Rep. John Sims Jr., D-Flemingsburg, said he did file a discharge petition Tuesday, which was signed by 27 representatives.

“It’s an important bill that has lots of momentum throughout the whole state,” Sims said.

Discharge petitions can prompt the full chamber to vote on whether a committee has held a particular bill “for an unreasonable time,” according to the House’s procedural rules. (HB 166 was sent to the House Judiciary Committee for review in mid-January.)

If a majority of the House agrees a bill has been held too long, the legislation then can be released from that committee. That doesn’t guarantee it will be debated and voted upon by the full House, though.

House Speaker Pro Tem David Osborne, R-Prospect, said Grimes’ assertion that House leaders are holding medical marijuana legislation hostage is “absolutely not true” and suggested Grimes study up on the legislative process.

When asked if House leadership would be interested in bringing the medical marijuana bill to the floor of the chamber for a vote, Osborne said he’s sure they would take appropriate action if it were discharged from the committee.

On Wednesday afternoon, however, Sims — a key sponsor of the bill — said it’s highly likely HB 166 will die when the 2018 session officially ends next month.

“There’s not enough time left to get it through both chambers,” Sims said.

If the bill stalls out as Sims expects, he said legislation to legalize medical marijuana will be reintroduced when the legislature reconvenes next January for the 2019 session.

“We’re not giving up, and the fight will continue,” he said, noting the need to maintain the momentum that has built behind the push for medical marijuana in Kentucky.

Morgan Watkins: 502-582-4502;; Twitter: @MorganWatkins. Support strong local journalism by subscribing today:



Kentuckians for Medicinal Marijuana

More information as it becomes available…

(KY) According to the Office of Drug Control Policy, in 2016, approximately 561,000 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $745,000 worth of assets were seized…

Dear Ms. Krider;

Thank you for contacting me with your thoughts on marijuana. Your views help me represent Kentucky and the nation in the United States Senate, and I appreciate the opportunity to respond to your concerns.

In your correspondence, you expressed your thoughts on rescheduling marijuana from its current status as a Schedule I controlled substance. Kentuckians continue to combat the negative consequences associated with the cultivation and distribution of marijuana in communities across the state. According to the Office of Drug Control Policy, in 2016, approximately 561,000 plants were eradicated in the Commonwealth, over $745,000 worth of assets were seized, and more than 85 weapons were taken off the streets as a result of the marijuana eradication operations. Kentucky carries the dubious distinction of ranking as one of the top marijuana producing states in the nation. Traffickers have been known to trespass on both private and public lands, often resulting in damage to private property and many of the Commonwealth’s most cherished natural habitats.

That is one reason why I encouraged Gil Kerlikowske, then-Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, to tour Kentucky. Known as the country’s “drug czar,” Director Kerlikowske focused his attention on better understanding the scope of Kentucky’s drug problem in order to make an informed decision on how best to continue the federal government’s commitment to combating drugs in the Commonwealth within current resource limitations.

There is no doubt that drug abuse persists as a serious problem in all 120 counties of the Commonwealth, and the effects of such abuse have proved devastating for our local communities. Because of the harm that substances like marijuana and other illegal drugs pose to our society, I oppose their legalization. That said, I will keep your thoughts in mind as the 115th Congress progresses.

Thank you for contacting me about this important matter. If you would like to receive periodic updates about issues such as this, please sign up for my eNewsletter at and become a fan of my page on Facebook, by visiting or follow my office on Twitter @McConnellPress.



(HB 166) Medical Cannabis Revenue Now Directed Towards Pensions

Medical Cannabis Revenue Now Directed Towards Pensions

Medical Cannabis As New Source of Revenue for KY & Pensions?

Since the 2nd week of #KYGA18 HB166 has been the most viewed & monitored bill in Frankfort. The people want and need medical cannabis.

So why is HB166 not moving forward even with having been granted 3 committee hearings, and having the votes to pass out of the Judiciary committee & House?

The answer is House of Representative members do not want to vote or pass something so controversial if the Senate refuses to accept it.

Right now the KY Senate is overwhelmed with the pension & budget issue. We’re being told they will not take on any new bills, period!

That’s where the KY Teachers, Government Retirees and pensioners come in.

We have now added language to HB166 to help generate A NEW SOURCE OF REVENUE to help fund the pension deficit. (*we’ll attach a picture of the bill language below)

Revenue from wholesale excise taxes & canna-business licenses will be used to fund various pensions to 80%.

We need your help to create this new revenue source, and to bring a better quality of life to thousands of patients.

There’s only a few more days of session left.

Call your legislators today BEFORE 6PM EST

(800) 372-7181

Leave a message saying:

“We found a new source of revenue for our pensions, and respectfully ask you to bring HB166 up for a vote on Monday. VOTE YES ON HB166!”


March 7, 2018 Today In Frankfort; Praying for HB 166 !

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As I sat here patiently waiting for the Kentucky Legislature to take a vote on HB 166, I was thinking of a way to say,


to ALL of the people who took a stand this year in Kentucky!

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Jaime Montalvo   Justin Lewandoski   Eric Michelle Crawford   Pat Dunegan   Jennifer Dunegan   Dan Seum   Sally Oh   Dan Malano Seum   Tony Ashley   Elihu Shepherd   Tim Simpson   Henry Fox   Gina Daugherty   Chad Wilson    Thomas Tony Vance    Rebecca Collins   Blackii Effing Whyte 

There are many more which have not been listed here! 

Remembering also those that have in past years took up this fight and were the leaders from the beginning!

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Gatewood Galbraith – Wikipedia   Galbraith supported the legalization of recreational marijuana use, arguing that the framers of the US Constitution “did not say we have a Constitutional right to possess alcohol. They said we have a Constitutional right to privacy in our homes, under which fits the possession of an extremely poisonous alcohol. Now this is the law in Kentucky today. In fact, it is these rulings that keep the Kentucky State Police from kicking down the doors of people possessing alcohol in Kentucky’s 77 ‘dry’ counties right now and hauling their butts off to jail. Now Marijuana is a demonstrably less harmful substance than alcohol and presents far less of threat to public welfare. So it also fits in a person’s right to privacy in their home. It’s beyond the police power of the state as long as I don’t sell it and it’s for my own personal use.”[10]

Craig Lee   Tony Adkins  Ron Moore  David Weigand   Angela Gatewood   Erin Grossman Vu  Robin Rider-Osborne   Paula Willett  Cher Ford-mccullough Brian McCullough  Mary Thomas-Spears  Lynne Wilson  Roland A. Duby   Hugh Yonn  Patrick Moore  

Again, I have missed so many names that should be listed here! 

Many people put their own lives on hold to take on Kentucky’s Cannabis battle, whether it be for medicinal, recreational or even palliative care, they all took a stand…and walked all the way to Frankfort to prove it.    Not literally, of course.  I hope they all had a decent ride to get there but surely there were a few old broken down cars in the parking lot as well.  But by the time they all left there yesterday evening it felt as though they had  literally walked those miles.

All different types of people working toward one cause – to get some kind of Cannabis reform into Kentucky!

At the end of the day, the vote for HB 166 was passed over!  A very disappointing outcome for many thousands of Kentuckians who very much needed that Bill to pass! 

How is it possible that legislation so favored by the citizens has not already become law? What is it about this legislation that has Kentucky’s legislators so scared that they are willing to buck the will of the majority of the citizens?
I am of course talking about the legalization of cannabis for medical uses. With 80% favorability and a multitude of benefits arising from the use of cannabis it is confounding to see the Assembly leadership refuse the will of the people and bury all cannabis bills in committee. For what purpose are they doing this?  LINK

When I first started posting to blogs about medical cannabis or “repeal prohibition” it was 2003.  That was 15 years ago.  By the time I became affiliated with the USMjParty it was 2005 and 2010 before I really became involved in any administration of the group.  I always fought for the repeal of prohibition as a whole, but most importantly for Cannabis because yes, I believe Cannabis is a medicine, but first it has to be recognized as a food or ‘herb’ that cannot be controlled by the U.N. or any Government entity!  It is our unalienable right to grow and use the plants that our “Creator” put here on this planet for us! Only commerce can be controlled by our Government, according to the Constitution.  Therefore what we grow on our property or consume in our homes is actually none of the Government’s business!  But they MADE it their business – a long time ago. 

To understand how they accomplished this takeover, you can read the “Elkhorn Manifesto” through this link.  That was the beginning of the downfall of the United States as we see it today.  The U.N. which was formed in 1945 with five founding members including the United States was the beginning of the NWO as we know it today.  The ONDCP and the 1961 Narcotic Convention as well as the 1970 Controlled Substance Act and the DEA instituted by Nixon, as a requirement of the 1970 CSA, as per the U.N., conveniently wrapped up our lives under the control of the NWO.  I wrote about this a couple of years ago and it has a lot of interesting links of information it that article.

The U.N. just issued a statement reminding all signatory Countries to be mindful of their “Treaties” regarding Marijuana.

Be mindful of the fact that it is not just Marijuana that they seek to control.  Control the food and medicine and you will control the people.

We are just now seeing how one world Government will work.  It is reaching into all facets of our lives, some not noticeable yet to the average person, not just whether or not Marijuana is “legal”. 

All of these things together, coupled with the fact that our Legislature has their own agenda for Kentucky influences the outcome of any Cannabis legislation being passed here. 

We still have a couple weeks to see what the outcome will be for the Citizens of Kentucky.  Will the hard work by our dedicated Activists pay off for the Patients who are in such need in our State?  We can only continue to pray and also continue calling


and make sure your voice is heard!

As well, K.C.F.C. and others are gathering in Frankfort to show support.  You can follow them at this LINK.

There is a VERY good article documenting all of the Cannabis Bills in Kentucky this year at Kentucky Free Press.  If you haven’t already done so I encourage you to look at it.

Sally Oh,  who writes for Kentucky Free Press, was LIVE on Facebook on February 25th, explaining Medical Cannabis, States’ Rights & the Civil War  and I encourage you to view that video as well.

Sally Oh KY Free Press

Again, I want to thank everyone that has made an effort of any kind in Kentucky toward the repeal of Cannabis prohibition!  We all basically want the same thing – our patients to be taken care of and the freedom to possess, grow and consume a plant that our Creator blessed us with!

God Bless!


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The House Republican budget plan includes a hike in the cigarette tax and a new tax on dosages of opioid drugs…

Plan would raise Kentucky’s cigarette tax above $1 per pack to pay for education

Tom Loftus, Louisville Courier Journal Published 7:53 p.m. ET Feb. 27, 2018

Plan would raise cigarette taxes above $1 per pack to pay for education

FRANKFORT, Ky. — The House Republican budget plan includes a hike in the cigarette tax and a new tax on dosages of opioid drugs to help restore funding for education, according to two House Democrats.

House Democratic Whip Dennis Keene, of Wilder, and Rep. Kelly Flood, of Lexington, said they were among a group of Democrats given an advance briefing late Tuesday afternoon on the budget plan of the majority Republicans.

Keene and Flood said in separate phone interviews that they were told House Republicans will propose to come up with additional money through a 50-cent increase in Kentucky’s 60-cent per pack cigarette tax and a new tax of 25 cents per dosage of opioid drugs.

“The new dollars generated are targeted for education …” Flood said. “The lobbying effort and citizen engagement on the part of teachers, superintendents, principals, parents and students has paid off.”

Keene and Flood said they were told the new revenue would allow the budget to increase funding for the main public school program known as SEEK (Support Education Excellence in Kentucky) as well as restore much, if not all, of the cut that Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget would have made in funding to school districts for student transportation.

Background: Here are the 70 programs not funded by Bevin’s proposed budget

More: Some Kentucky schools could fail under Bevin’s proposed budget

Keene said that Rep. Steven Rudy, the Paducah Republican who chairs the House budget committee, and House Republican Leader Jonathan Shell, of Lancaster, briefed Democratic leaders and Democrats on the budget committee.

Keene said, “It’s not all crystal clear. … The briefing lasted about an hour and we weren’t given anything in writing.”

Flood also said the House GOP budget plan will restore some funding that Bevin’s proposal would have cut from state universities and would address the problem of the governor’s failure to fund health insurance for teachers who retired since July 1, 2010, but have not turned 65 and become eligible for Medicaid.

“If I understood that correctly, that issue (retired teacher health insurance) is being addressed, but in another way that may not be in this budget bill,” Flood said.

Earlier Tuesday, Rudy told reporters that his committee planned to meet Wednesday afternoon and release its revised version of the 2018-2020 budget bill. He also said the committee would consider a revenue bill.

But both Rudy and House Speaker Pro Tem David Osborne, R-Prospect, declined to provide any details. Also, each was asked if the revenue bill included any cigarette tax or opioid tax provisions, and they declined to comment.

In January, Bevin proposed an austere budget that would fully fund the state’s huge pension obligations and that he said would put Kentucky’s financial house in order. But to do so, Bevin said he was required to slash spending to most parts of government and eliminate funding for 70 specific smaller state programs.

That proposal was met by a storm of objections — particularly from school districts that would be saddled with additional costs, particularly for student transportation.

Flood said Democrats were told at the meeting that a 50 cent increase in the cigarette tax would raise about $127 million in the first year of the budget, and $110 million the second year.

She said the tax on dosages of opioids would be applied at the wholesale level and generate about $70 million per year.

Flood also said the plan calls for eliminating a $10 per person tax credit on the individual income tax, a move that would generate about $55 million per year.

While encouraged by the move to raise revenue, Flood said she’s disappointed that the plan is based on revenue sources like tobacco that will decline over time. “This is not tax reform, modernization or matching our taxes where consumers are spending more today on services,” she said.

She said she’d have to consider all aspects of the budget and revenue bills before deciding whether to vote for them. “I will vote for increased revenue if I think we’re doing the right thing overall,” she said.

Flood is uncertain whether a budget plan bolstered by small tax increases could pass the Republican House and, later, the Republican Senate. But she noted that the increases proposed for cigarettes and opioids would not be so politically unpopular.

“After all, the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce is on record for supporting a $1 increase in the cigarette tax,” she said.

Health advocates have been pushing for legislation that would raise the cigarette tax by $1 a pack — a big increase that they say would significantly reduce teen smoking.

Tom Loftus:; Twitter: @TomLoftus_CJ. Support strong local journalism by subscribing today:


Two Kentucky men have murder charges dismissed in ‘satanic’ killing

by Associated Press

BRANDENBURG, Ky. — A Kentucky judge dismissed murder charges Monday against two men for a 1990s killing that authorities at the time described as “satanic.”

Garr Keith Hardin and Jeffrey Dewayne Clark had their convictions in Meade County vacated in 2016 based on DNA testing and evidence of police misconduct. They were released from prison in August of that year after serving 21 years.

Hardin and Clark were convicted in 1995 of killing 19-year-old Rhonda Sue Warford, based in part on the prosecution’s contention that a hair found on her body was a match to Hardin. They were sentenced to life in prison.

On Monday, Meade County Circuit Judge Bruce Butler dismissed the 1992 murder indictments against the men at the urging of the state attorney general’s office.

“The struggle for justice has been long and painful for Mr. Hardin and Mr. Clark, who served more than 20 years and whom the Commonwealth twice threatened with the death penalty for a crime they did not commit,” said Seema Saifee, a staff attorney with The Innocence Project. The group is representing Hardin.

The Innocence Project fought for years to have the evidence tested for DNA, and the Kentucky Supreme Court granted the request in 2013. The testing revealed the hair didn’t come from Hardin.

Judge Butler overturned their conviction in 2016, finding it “based on suppositions that we now know to be fundamentally false.”

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office, which took over the case last year, has pledged to re-investigate Warford’s killing.


Jeffrey Clark, third from left, and Garr Keith Hardin, second from right, spent 21 years in prison for a 1992 murder before their convictions were overturned. Natalia Martinez / WAVE 3 News

At Hardin and Clark’s murder trial in 1995, prosecutors claimed they committed the killings as part of a satanic sacrifice, according to a release Monday from The Innocence Project.

Part of the evidence was a bloody cloth and broken glass recovered from Hardin’s home that prosecutors said was stained during an animal sacrifice. They said the glass was a “chalice” from which Hardin drank the blood of animals.

Hardin testified at trial that the blood on the cloth was his own, caused by cutting himself on the glass.

A police detective who testified at the trial said Hardin told him that he killed animals as a form of satanic ritual and “got tired of looking at animals and began to want to do human sacrifices.” Hardin denied making those statements.