150 years ago in November 1862: The Civil War years Read more: RN-T.com – 150 years ago in November 1862 The Civil War years

 

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Rome Area History Museum volunteer Dennis Nordeman is compiling notable local news items related to the Civil War in commemoration of the war’s sesquicentennial to be shared each week:
To explore further see scanned pdf documents of Rome’s Tri Weekly Courier.

Week ending date Saturday, November 15, 1862

“There has been some stealing, in a small way, going on in town lately, “ reported the Tri-Weekly Courier. “It would well for our citizens to secure their windows properly, and keep an eye on their wood piles.” http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/nov 13 1862 thur.pdf

A case of small pox on a soldier in the Soldiers Relief Room was reported.  As some citizens were exposed before the nature of the disease was known and they were requested to remain indoors for the present.  Parents were requested to keep their children off the streets.  “And what is more important than all else, let every body – old and young – be vaccinated.”  http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/nov 15 1862 sat.pdf

Members of the 8th Regiment Georgia Volunteers who were staying home but “not on genuine furloughs” and are able for duty were to be arrested and jailed if they did not report to the enrolling officer according to a noticed published by J. R. Towers of that Regiment.  http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/nov 11 1862 tues.pdf

Week ending date Saturday, November 8, 1862
Correspondence from the 8th Georgia regiment stationed near Old Forge described what clothing the men would need for the upcoming winter.  “A change of under clothes, a comfortable uniform, an overcoat, two blankets and a pair of shoes, is all the clothing a soldier can take care of, even in winter, and if more is sent to him, the chances are at least, that he will loose [sic] the surplus.” http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/nov 4 1862 tues.pdf
Correspondence from the Cherokee Artillery summarized their “weary pilgrimage up and down the State of Kentucky.”  It ended with:  “The object of our expedition into Kentucky remains shrouded in mystery.  We could easily have marched to and taken Louisville, after the battle of Perryville;…and we could have held the State during the winter…. Her sons were led to believe that her redemption was nigh; they are now disheartened…”  http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/nov 4 1862 tues.pdf
A concert of young ladies in the Cave Spring area was held for the benefit of the soldiers. “ The evening was a delightful one, and the proceeds satisfactory.”    In addition their citizens of Cave Spring resolved to raise local sales tax for the relief of the soldiers.  http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/nov 6 1862 thur.pdf
Major R. H. Moore and W. DeJournett published a proclamation from the Freemen of Floyd paying tribute to the memory those in their company that had died since they were organized in May 1862.  The names of Jasper Lumpkin, Dr. John Martin, and D. R. Mitchell, Jr. were listed in the proclamation.  http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/nov 8 1862 sat.pdf
Week ending date Saturday, November 1, 1862
As winter approached many articles in the Tri-Weekly Courier dealt with providing winter clothing for the troops and with the supply and price of salt which was critical for meat preservation.  The troops is Savannah reported that salt was going for $150 per sack and although there was no sea salt in the city it was selling “at the works at $22 per bushel.”    http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/oct 28 1862 tues.pdf

A recipe to make salt was also published which gave directions how to reclaim and recycle the salt from the soil beneath your meat house. http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/oct 30 1862 thur.pdf

The first snow of the season was reported on Saturday October 25.  Although it had “melted by daylight, except what had fallen on the roofs of houses…. On Sunday morning the snow covered roofs, the cold, hard looking clouds and the cold wind, presented a decidedly wintry appearance.  It is now clear and cold.”   http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/oct 28 1862 tues.pdf

Captain Yarbrough, Lieut. John Harkins, Capt. Dunlap Scott were in town and were soliciting winter clothing for the men in their respective companies.  St. Peter’s Church announced a special collection for that purpose.

Word from Savannah and the Berry Infantry told about an engagement with Federal troops invading South Carolina and damaging railroad rails and telegraph  lines before being repelled.  “The loss on our side was small–The enemy’s more than double us.” http://home.comcast.net/~rometwcourier/1862/4 Oct-Dec/oct 30 1862 thur.pdf

Click here to read ‘150 years ago in October 1862: The Civil War Years’

Read more: RN-T.com – 150 years ago in November 1862 The Civil War years

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