GLOBAL MARIJUANA MARCH, ON DERBY DAY, MAY 3RD, IN LOUISVILLE, KY!

*GLOBAL MARIJUANA MARCH LOUISVILLE KENTUCKY ON MAY 3

Presented by Kentucky Marijuana Party and DIVERSE SANCTUARY

Louisville, Kentucky, April 30, 2014–

The Global Marijuana March is coming to Louisville, Kentucky on Saturday May 3rd, 2014 which coincides with Kentucky Derby Day!

This will be the FIRST GLOBAL MARIJUANA MARCH that LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY has participated in.

Per Wikipedia:

Hundreds of thousands of people have participated in over 829 different cities in 72 countries worldwide since 1999

The following route will be adhered to as submitted to the Louisville Permit Office:

*Note: We will meet in front of Mid City Mall on Bardstown Road in Louisville, Kentucky at 10:30am sharp for the walk to begin at 11:00.  The permit ends at 12:30pm.  However, there are many restaurants, shops, and other places to visit in the Highlands neighborhood of Louisville!  So spend the day and enjoy!

Start at Mid City Mall at 1250 Bardstown Rd. Head northwest on Bardstown Rd toward Beechwood Ave
0.5 mi

Continue onto Baxter Ave
0.3 mi
(Corner of Baxter and Broadway)

Head northwest on Baxter Ave toward Cherokee Rd
220 ft.

Sharp right onto Cherokee Rd
0.9 mi.

Turn right onto Longest Ave
492 ft.

Turn right onto Bardstown Rd
To 1250 Bardstown Rd.
400 ft.

TOTAL 1.8 MILES

WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR PARKING.

ALL LOCAL LAWS MUST BE ADHERED TO WHILE PARTICIPATING!

PLEASE BE CONSIDERATE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD!

THIS EVENT IS INTENDED TO RAISE AWARENESS CONCERNING CANNABIS/HEMP/”MARIJUANA”, IT’S VALUE TO OUR SOCIETY AND REASONS TO “REPEAL” THE EXISTING CANNABIS LAWS VERSUS THE “LEGALIZATION” OF THE PLANT!

PLEASE COME OUT AND SUPPORT YOUR RIGHT TO GROW NON-GMO, NON-REGULATED CANNABIS!

# # #

If you would like more information about this topic, please contact Sheree M Krider at U.S. Marijuana Party of KENTUCKY (ph: 270-612-0524) or email at shereekrider@usmjparty.com.

*Diverse Sanctuary, Mary Thomas-Spears, Bowling Green, Kentucky, (ph: 270-904-0279)

On this day in history: 19 November 1863

Words of Lincoln console nation

 

 

On 19 November 1863 President Abraham Lincoln dedicated a cemetery on a Civil War battlefield where 51,000 Confederate and Union soldiers

were lost or wounded after just three days of fighting.  Most Americans cannot hear the name of the Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg without

thinking of Lincoln’s famous speech on that occasion.

 

“It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task

remaining before us… that this nation, under God,

shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government

of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not

perish from the earth “  President Abraham Lincoln

 

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition

that all men are created equal.”

“Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure.

We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who

here gave their lives, that that nation might live.

It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate – we cannot

hallow – this ground.

The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract.

The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.

It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion

to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that

this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that

government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Top ten climate polluters in Kentucky

James Bruggers, jbruggers@courier-journal.com 7:14 p.m. EDT September 30, 2014

 

 

Power plants top Kentucky’s biggest sources of climate pollution, according to just-released data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

There’s no surprise there.

But a prominent chemical plant in Louisville’s Rubbertown area — Dupont Louisville Works — is in the top ten biggest climate polluters in Kentucky for its emissions of hydrofluorocarbons, which the EPA say are actually more potent than carbon dioxide when it comes to heating up the atmosphere.

The EPA released its fourth year of Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program data, detailing greenhouse gas pollution trends and emissions broken down by industrial sector, geographic region and individual facilities. In 2013, reported emissions from large industrial facilities nationwide were 20 million metric tons higher than the prior year, or 0.6 percent, driven largely by an increase in coal use for power generation, the agency said.

That figure intrigued me because conventional wisdom is that we’ve been burning more natural gas (which has less impact on the climate) and less coal.

RELATED: Air pollution district, union agree on job cuts

There is a lot of data to look at, and this is just my first crack at it. I started by doing a quick search of top emitters in Kentucky and Indiana, then top emitters in Louisville Metro, or Jefferson County.

Kentucky Utility’s Ghent plant topped all of Kentucky’s largest industrial sources of a several greenhouse gases, with 12.8 million metric tons released in 2013, the most current year for which the data is available. That’s up 12 percent from the year before. LG&E’s Mill Creek plant in Louisville ranked third, with 7.9 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions, a 20 percent decrease since 2010, according to the data.

But Dupont, the long-time Rubbertown chemical plant, ranked 7th, emitting 4,1 million tons, nearly all of that hydrofluorocarbons. That number was down from about 6 million pounds in 2011.

So what are hydrofluorocarbons and what impact do they have on the climate?

From the EPA:

Unlike many other greenhouse gases, fluorinated gases have no natural sources and only come from human-related activities. They are emitted through a variety of industrial processes such as aluminum and semiconductor manufacturing. Many fluorinated gases have very high global warming potentials (GWPs) relative to other greenhouse gases, so small atmospheric concentrations can have large effects on global temperatures.

HCFCs can have a global warming potential of between 140 to 11,700 times that of carbon dioxide, EPA says. The larger the global warming potential, the more warming the gas causes, according to EPA. The agency explains it this way: “For example, methane’s 100-year GWP is 21, which means that methane will cause 21 times as much warming as an equivalent mass of carbon dioxide over a 100-year time period.”

Statewide rankings for Kentucky:

1) Ghent power plant, 12.8 million metric tons.

2) Paradise power plant, 12.1.

3) Mill Creek power plant, 7.9.

4) H.L. Spurlock power plant, 7.8.

5) Trimble County power plant, 7.3.

6) Shawnee power plant, 7.2.

7) Dupont Louisville Works chemical plant, 4.1.

8) R.D. Green power plant, 3.6.

9) East Bend power plant, 3.5.

10) Coleman power plant, 3.3.

Two southern Indiana power plants ranked among the top ten greenhouse gas emitters in Indiana:

1) Gibson power plant, 16 million metric tons.

10) Clifty power plant, 5.8 million metric tons.

 

CONTINUE READING…

Much at stake in struggle for control of Kentucky House

By Jack Brammer

jbrammer@herald-leader.com    September 6, 2014

 

FRANKFORT — Under a broiling sun Thursday in front of the Kentucky Capitol, House Republican Leader Jeff Hoover explained and expounded on his vision for a Republican-led state House.

With about 20 candidates from the Grand Old Party behind him, Hoover talked about overhauling the tax code, repealing an expansion of Medicaid under “Obamacare,” passing “right-to-work” legislation that would allow people to work in businesses that have unions without joining the union, creating medical review panels to curb frivolous lawsuits, and implementing a host of other conservative proposals.

House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said he was glad Hoover held the news conference — the last one of a three-day media tour in the state to tout House Republican candidates.

“It’s a waste of time for them. The House is going to stay Democratic,” Stumbo predicted.

An intense political struggle is underway in the Bluegrass State for control of the state House in the Nov. 4 elections.

Democrats have dominated it since 1921, but Republicans have been steadily gaining on them in the last 20 years.

In 1994, Democrats outnumbered Republicans 71-29 in the House. That dipped to 64-35 in 2004. This year, it stands at 54-46.

Democrats and Republicans agree on at least one thing: Much is at stake.

Gov. Steve Beshear, a Democrat, is concerned his last two years in office could by stymied if Republicans control both the House and Senate. Republicans took over the Senate in 2000 and maintain a solid grip on the upper chamber.

Beshear, who has been on the campaign trail for House Democratic candidates, dismissed the House GOP’s media tour and “Handshake with Kentucky” legislative platform as “the same old stuff they have touted for years.”

“They want to reduce taxes on the wealthy and put more of the tax burden on the middle class,” Beshear said. “They want to take away health care for 500,000 Kentuckians who just got it, many for the first time. They do not support the minimum wage. To me, it’s the same-old same-old.”

Hoover, a Jamestown attorney who concedes that he would like to replace Stumbo as House speaker, said the future of Kentucky is at stake.

“The people will have to decide if we are going to continue the status quo of high unemployment,” Hoover said. “Are we going to do things differently? Are we going to change the landscape to create more jobs?”

Stumbo, who has been House speaker since 2009, said Kentuckians need only look at what has happened in other states where “radical Republicans” took over in recent years to understand what’s at stake.

“You have teacher strikes, labor unrest, economic development halts,” Stumbo said. “Kentucky is coming out of a major national recession that started with Republicans. We don’t want to go back.”

Stumbo especially scoffed at two major pledges in the House Republican “Handshake” platform: ending corruption in the Kentucky House and passing a constitutional amendment that would presumably block implementation of parts of the federal health care law.

“They want to pass a constitutional amendment to prohibit any person or employer being forced to participate in a care system. That’s unconstitutional,” he said.

Stumbo noted that the Affordable Care Act, which the U.S. Supreme Court has declared constitutional, includes a penalty provision for people who do not get health insurance.

“The Republicans want to opt out of federal law,” Stumbo said. “That’s one of the most ridiculous things I’ve ever heard. Sounds like they want to boost states’ rights when we had things like slavery.”

Hoover laughed when told Stumbo said the GOP amendment was unconstitutional.

“My understanding is that other states have passed or proposed such legislation,” Hoover said. “I hear a lot of Kentuckians say they have real problems with mandated coverage. I threw it out there and it’s something we’re going to look at.”

Hoover and GOP leaders also want to repeal an expansion of Medicaid that Beshear implemented under the federal health law, saying Kentucky could face a financial crisis if the move isn’t reversed.

As of July 31, more than 521,000 Kentuckians had enrolled in coverage through Kynect, the health insurance exchange created by Beshear under the federal law. The majority of those enrolled received Medicaid, the government-funded insurance program for the poor and disabled.

The percentage of adults without health insurance in Kentucky has dropped from 20.4 percent last year to less than 12 percent, the second largest decline among the states since the federal law took effect in January, according to a Gallup poll released last month.

The federal government is paying the entire cost of the expansion for the first few years, but that drops to 90 percent in coming years.

“Where are we going to pick up the cost for this? $300 million? $500 million? $600 million?” Hoover asked. “Somebody has to talk about picking up the cost.”

Stumbo also derided the GOP’s pledge to end corruption in the Kentucky House.

Hoover this week regularly mentioned the ongoing sexual harassment scandal in the House when talking about the GOP pledge.

Sexual harassment lawsuits have been filed against former Democratic Rep. John Arnold of Sturgis. Democrat Will Coursey of Symsonia in Graves County, who is in a tight re-election fight, also has been sued on allegations that he retaliated against a Legislative Research Commission employee after she made claims about his behavior.

Both Arnold and Coursey deny any wrongdoing.

Stumbo said it’s odd that Republicans are talking about ending corruption. He highlighted three controversies involving Republicans:

■ State Rep. Ben Waide of Madisonville is under state indictment for alleged campaign finance violations but claims he did nothing wrong.

■ U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield of Hopkinsville is under investigation by a House ethics panel over allegations that his wife — a lobbyist for the U.S. Humane Society Legislative Fund — improperly lobbied him on behalf of legislation he is sponsoring related to show horses. He has said there was no wrongdoing.

■ Ernie Fletcher, who was governor from 2003 to 2007, was indicted in a state hiring scandal. Fletcher issued several pardons and the investigation was ended by an agreement in 2006 between Fletcher and Stumbo, who was then attorney general.

Besides a war of words on issues, the House Democrats and Republicans are conducting vigorous campaigns and trying to raise as much money as possible to pay for them.

Western Kentucky, where Republicans have gained ground in recent House elections, continues to be a prime potential spot for Republican victories, said Hoover.

He also noted that the 39th House District race in Jessamine and parts of Fayette County seems to be extremely tight.

In that race, Democrat Russ Meyer and Republican Jonah Mitchell, both of Nicholasville, are seeking to replace Democrat Bob Damron, who is running for Jessamine County judge-executive.

Last month, WHAS-TV in Louisville and CN2’s Pure Politics reported that at least six Republican state House candidates had complained that they were the targets of telephone polls that gave positive statements about the Democratic candidate before listing “possible criticisms” of the Republican candidate.

Stumbo acknowledged that Democrats have “tested” messages. “They are truthful,” he said.

It’s possible the Nov. 4 elections could produce a 50-50 split in the House, but Stumbo and Hoover downplay the possibility.

“I believe if we can even get close to 50, there would be some Democrats in the House who would switch to Republicans,” Hoover said.

Stumbo said “terrible gridlock” has occurred in states where an even split has occurred.

Jack Brammer: (502) 227-1198. Twitter: @BGPolitics. Blog: bluegrasspolitics.bloginky.com

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/09/06/3415395_much-at-stake-in-struggle-for.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

Rand Paul abandons Ron Paul on war and peace

Months ago, the isolationism of Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) was so extreme that I said he might as well be President Bashar Assad’s man in Washington, referring to the Syrian dictator and murderer at a time when Rand Paul was following the policy of Ron Paul of extreme non-intervention. Times have changed, or shall I say Rand Paul’s calculations have changed, so his positions have changed.

Now Sen. Paul mocks President Obama over the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and vows to be a super-hawk going after ISIS. I guess when it’s time to raise campaign money for a presidential campaign, and time to court neoconservatives, and time to appeal to a GOP that does not favor extreme isolationism, the new Rand Paul now debates the old Rand Paul, while he throws under the bus the principled stand of the only true Ron Paul.

When Rand Paul suggests that Obama has created a “jihadist wonderland,” can he deny every jihadi in the world would have spent recent years cheering Rand Paul’s extremism isolationism? He not only reveals a lack of depth and commitment on national security, and reveals the kind of shallow opportunism that voters reject in politicians today, but he abandons the long legacy of the principled foreign policy of Ron Paul.

Regarding Iraq, I agreed with Ron Paul and opposed the invasion of Iraq by Bush 43, while on some other issues I disagreed with his noninterventionism. But Ron Paul, unlike Rand Paul, took a highly principled position, which I respect.

At various times Rand Paul has been against action on Syria before he was for it. He was for cutting aid to Israel before he was against it. At one point, he appeared to be for and against action against Iran at the same time. Rand Paul’s views on national security are like the old soap opera “As the World Turns.” What will Rand Paul believe tomorrow about war and peace? Who knows? In presidential politics, unlike Ron Paul, it is political calculation that determines Rand Paul’s military policies in what may be titled “As Rand Paul Turns.”

Folks, the gentleman from Kentucky is not ready to be commander-in-chief, not even close. He makes Barack Obama look like British Prime Minister Winston Churchill by comparison. And now he throws Ron Paul’s foreign policy position under the bus, which will not persuade neoconservatives or mainline Republicans that he is ready to be commander-in-chief, but may persuade many Ron Paul supporters that like father is not always like son.

Budowsky was an aide to former Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) and former Rep. Bill Alexander (D-Ark.), who was then chief deputy majority whip of the House. He holds an LL.M. degree in international financial law from the London School of Economics. Contact him at brentbbi@webtv.net.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/campaign/216820-rand-paul-abandons-ron-paul-on-war-and-peace#ixzz3CXCXhBf3
Follow us: @thehill on Twitter | TheHill on Facebook

Christian County preps for first hemp harvest

Hemp

Posted: Monday, August 25, 2014 7:13 pm | Updated: 10:48 pm, Mon Aug 25, 2014.

By Margarita Cambest, New Era staff writer | 0 comments

Though the bumper stickers might have made one think they were at a political rally, local law enforcement, farmers and officials from both major parties toured one of two industrial hemp plots Monday in Christian County.

For the first time in 50 years, the research crop was planted in June at Davis Farms in Pembroke and Rachel McCubbin’s llama farm in northern Christian County.

Two months later, both plots have shot up out of the ground. Much higher than knee-high in July, the Davis Farm plot towered well above even the tallest of those in attendance.

Hemp is illegal in the U.S. because of its similarity to the more-potent marijuana. The plot is one of many pilots planted across the state before the official start of summer.

With the support of both Democrats and Republicans, research plots of the crop were legalized through a provision in the federal farm bill. Kentucky, once a leader in industrial hemp production, ordered seeds from Italy bound for pilots across the state, but they were held up for more than a month in a customs battle with federal agencies. The state’s department of agriculture eventually filed suit in federal court to release the seeds and got them back after agreeing to additional paperwork.

The office of Sen. Rand Paul and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture hosted the tour.

McCubbin, Paul’s deputy state director, said her crop did not do as well after a summer with little rain. However, with more testing she said the crop could bring business to Kentucky.

“It’s not illegal to purchase or repurpose these hemp products. They can sell it all day long but our farmers cannot grow it here.”

Attendees also included Democratic Hopkinsville mayoral candidate and former state senator Joey Pendleton and former Democratic representative Fred Nesler, who now works for the agriculture department.

“We do know our state is ripe for growing it (and) we do know there are farmers willing to grow it,“ Nesler said. “There’s people out there that are interested in growing this crop.”

Although not officially endorsing hemp in Kentucky, local law enforcement officials are opening themselves up to the possibilities industrial hemp could bring to the state’s economy.

Hemp can be used in everything from food to construction materials. Although hemp products are not illegal, U.S. farmers have not been permitted to grow hemp until now. Instead, products like hemp bath products, clothing and insulation are made from hemp grown in other countries, with much of it coming from Canada. The Davis Farm plot will test the crop’s potential to be used for fiber and may be used to create a concrete-like mixture that is more weather-resistant than cement.

Christian County Sheriff Livy Leavell questioned law enforcement’s job ahead, specifically how the department would differentiate between marijuana and hemp. In size and shape the plants are identical, and both contain the hallucinogenic causing chemical THC.

“If we pull over an 18-wheeler full of hemp, how do we know the difference?” Leavell asked.

Although hemp does not contain enough THC to produce a high, when tested using a chemical that reacts to the presence of THC by a Trenton police officer, hemp tested positive.

“I don’t envy your job,” McCubbin said to law enforcement representatives present.

Kentucky Industrial Hemp Commission member Katie Moyer said while the similarities in live plants may be uncanny, legal hemp growers would have necessary paperwork showing origin, destination and purpose.

Additionally, the state gives GPS coordinates of licensed growers’ plots to state police.

“Every trucker has a bill of lading,” Moyer said. “It doesn’t matter if you’re transporting Oreos or hemp.”

Moyer said it is also unlikely that hemp will be transported in its raw form as it will be baled and processed before shipping.

Reach Margarita Cambest at 270-887-3231 or mcambest@kentuckynewera.com.

CONTINUE READING…

Mitch McConnell’s campaign manager quits in the wake of Iowa Ron Paul scandal

 

 

 

 

The campaign manager for Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has resigned as a result of the ongoing scandal involving the 2012 presidential campaign of former Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, the Lexington Herald-Leader reports.

Jesse Benton joined the McConnell campaign for the 2014 cycle, after several years as an important member of the political organizations of Ron Paul and his son, Kentucky’s other U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. Benton previously managed Rand Paul’s 2010 Senate campaign, and then served as political director for Ron Paul’s presidential campaign. In addition, he is married to one of Ron Paul’s granddaughters.

This past week, a former Iowa state senator pled guilty to accepting payments of $73,000, which were laundered by members of the Ron Paul campaign, to switch his endorsement away from Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann and over to Paul. However, no individuals have actually been charged as of yet with making the payments.

For his own part, Benton is denying any allegations that he may have known about the payments. “I hope those who know me recognize that I strive to be a man of integrity,” Benton said in a statement. “The press accounts and rumors are particularly hurtful because they are false.”

Benton also said that the reelection of McConnell, who is in a close race against Democratic nominee Alison Lundergan Grimes, was the most important political cause for Kentucky and the country: “I believe this deep in my bones, and I would never allow anything or anyone to get in the way. That includes myself.”

- – Eric Kleefeld

CONTINUE READING…

14TH ANNUAL GLOBAL FEST IN THE BARRENS RETURNS SEPTEMBER 6, 2014

 

Sunday, 17 August 2014 12:44

The 14th annual Global Fest in the Barrens (www.barrenglobalfest.com) returns to Glasgow-Barren County on Saturday, September 6, 2014 from 10:00 A.M. To 5:00 P.M. held on the Glasgow Public Square in Glasgow, Kentucky.  Global Fest is a Celebration of World Cultures and American Unity that promotes interaction among diverse individuals by discovering their similarities and differences. A fun filled day promoting Education, Entertainment, Children’s Activities, sharing and enjoying the Diversity in our community. New this year is recognition of Global Fest Deceased Members. We also welcome Pleasant Valley Baptist, Uno who will sponsor International Games and Crafts for youth and Caveland Church who will sponsor Children’s activities. New entertainment this year is Plain Jane Rock Band, Hector Montenegro, and the Head Liner this year is Perfect Fit Band.

Brother Jordan Woodie from Coral Hill Baptist will provide the Invocation and Julie Ann will sing the National Anthem.

Kentucky Music will provide the Sound System that will fill the air with Gospel Music provided by the Nesbitt Family from Tennessee.  Country Music will be provided by Silver Eagle Band, Author Hatfield and Buck Creek, will provide Blue Grass Music,

Hector Montenegro will sing love songs.

The Head liner this year is Perfect Fit who will present a Genre of R&B, Motown, Blues and Top Hits.

Omega Force Worlds Famous Strong Team will deliver a message of hope.

Sisters with Praise will deliver a message through song and dance.

Children’s World (next to Commonwealth Broadway Building) is sponsored by Glasgow Barren Co. Tourist and Convention Commission, Boys and Girls Club, Big Brother & Big Sister, Pleasant Valley Baptist of Uno, and Cave Land Church. Children will talk to Sponge Bob and Dora the Explorer look a likes. Broadway the Clown will entertain the children with balloons and candy. The Zippy Pets, Train Ride and Bungee Bounce Jump will return this year. Activities for the children will include Face painting, Inflatable, Piñata Burst, and International Crafts and Games.

Cultural Educational Exhibits include: African American, American, African, Chinese,  Japan, Mexican, Native Americans Indians, Nicaragua, Philippine, Thailand, German, Italian, Bosnian and Cambodian, French, and Spanish.   Movies of World Cultures will be showing at George J’s. Passports and Stamps will be available in the Gazebo near the stage.  A prize will be given away to the person who collects all the stamps in the Passport.

Tasty Cuisine will be provided by:  B&D BBQ, New Orleans Style Snowball & BBQ, Tater BBQ, C & D BBQ, Shogun- Japanese, Anna’s Greek Restaurant – Greek, Backyard Party Creation- Carnival food, and Papa John’s Pizza, La Nacional-Mexican Food and Horse Cave Baptist Church Male Ministry-Fish, George J’s Diner-French.

Support Local Glasgow Downtown Businesses. Global Fest welcomes two new restaurants in downtown Glasgow, Shogun and Miqueals Bistro.

The information desk is located on the right of the main stage. Register for door prizes, festival schedule information and Tourist Travel Logs.

Global Fest is a Free Family Community Festival.

CONTINUE READING…

Jack Richardson | Comer to Louisville: Drop dead

Jack Richardson IV, Special to The Courier-Journal 1:51 p.m. EDT August 12, 2014

Despite the claims made by some in Frankfort, Kentucky is not in good shape. The recession that began at the end of the Bush presidency has continued through the Obama administration has hit us here in the commonwealth particularly hard.

Businesses are not coming here. Jobs and our children are leaving. The time has come for all of us, regardless of party and regional bias, to join hands and pull together in the same direction to produce a better, brighter future for us all.

It was unfortunate therefore to read that Commonwealth Agriculture Commissioner Jamie Comer, a prospective GOP nominee for governor next year, at the launch of his announcement of intentions at the highly notable Fancy Farm Picnic, proudly proclaimed that our state’s next chief executive “will not be from Louisville.”

Where the next governor comes from and lives with his or her family is not nearly as important as what the next governor intends to do for Kentucky.

Gov. Steve Beshear has had eight years to bring reform and growth to our state. He hasn’t, even if a good part of the blame can be affixed to policies coming down from Washington.

Our state needs a new leader with an agenda to bring jobs back to this state, regardless of where they end up — in Jefferson County or in another part of this great state.

At Fancy Farm, Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer confirms he is running for governor. Aug. 2, 2014 Matt Stone, The Courier-Journal

Hopefully the Republicans, who I believe will be favored to win the next election, will find a candidate who understands that we are ONE state, with ONE agenda: to become a regional leader in finance, education, agriculture, in health care delivery, manufacturing and other areas that will keep jobs here and provide a future for our children and grandchildren.

A political strategy that pits the rest of the state against Louisville might have worked in years past. Kentucky is faced with many challenges and needs and deserves more than that now — things are too serious for more politics as usual.

Telling Louisville, Kentucky’s economic engine, that you need not apply is the mark of a not-ready-for-prime-time novice and a sad beginning.

Remember, Kentucky’s motto is “United We Stand, Divided We Fall.”

Jack Richardson IV is the former chair of the Jefferson County Republican Party.

CONTINUE READING…

After a toxin from blue-green algae shut down Toledo’s water system, regulators in Kentucky and Indiana take a look at their states’ drinking water utilities.

Kentucky steps up response to toxic algae risks

James Bruggers, jbruggers@courier-journal.com  2:04 p.m. EDT August 15, 2014

When toxic algae left 500,000 people in the Toledo, Ohio, area without drinking water for two days this month, one of Kentucky’s top environmental regulators took notice.

“I was sitting there on a Friday evening, hearing various things from various counterparts, and I was thinking this can happen in my state,” recalled R. Bruce Scott, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection. “What are we doing to be prepared?”

First thing the following Monday, Scott put that question to his staff, and Kentucky officials have been working since to get answers by combing through documents filed by many of the state’s 467 public drinking water systems, and reaching out to some with questions.

The inquiry steps up Kentucky’s response to its emerging problem of toxic algae blooms, first documented in the state in late 2012 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Taylorsville Lake.

The review puts drinking water safety front and center, in addition to state and Army Corps concerns about recreational exposure to blue-green algae — a cyanobacteria that can produce toxins causing skin or eye irritation, nausea, flu-like symptoms and liver damage.

The blooms occur with sunlight, slow-moving water and too many nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. They’re made worse by pollution from sewage treatment plants, septic systems and runoff from fertilized farms and lawns.

COURIER-JOURNAL

Toxic algae makes a comeback at Kentucky and Indiana lakes

For the second year in a row, Kentucky and the corps have issued recreational advisories on some lakes because of the blooms. In all, 10 Kentucky lakes carry the warnings, including Barren River, Nolin River, Green River, Rough River and Guist Creek lakes.

None is closed to swimming, fishing or boating. Instead, authorities advise not swallowing lake water and washing well after swimming.

Source water concerns

In response to a Kentucky Open Records request, state officials acknowledged 10 public drinking water systems serving thousands of customers in Kentucky are drawing water from lakes with algae advisories.

They include the Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission, Edmonson County Water District and the Grayson County Water District.

State officials said they know of no immediate drinking water threats from algae anywhere in Kentucky. And officials with the Louisville Water Co. — which provides water to about 850,000 people in Louisville and parts of Bullitt, Nelson, Oldham, Shelby and Spencer counties — said they do not have any issues with toxic algae.

But state officials said they want all Kentucky drinking water providers to be ready to handle algae problems, and that is why they are taking a closer look at Kentucky’s drinking water systems.

State officials acknowledged even more systems could be at potential risk, where monitoring for toxic algae has not yet occurred. And Scott said there could be gaps in technology or expertise at some utilities, especially smaller systems with fewer resources.

“We need to make sure we are properly educating and informing our smaller systems of what they need to do,” Scott said. “We are asking what can and should be done to make sure we are looking at everything that needs to be looked at.”

If Kentucky water utilities don’t have procedures for analyzing their source water for the different types of toxic algae, state officials recommend developing some.

Scott said they want to make sure all systems understand what treatment methods work, and have an emergency response plan if their water becomes unsafe for drinking.

Rural water systems contacted by The Courier-Journal said their customers don’t need to worry.

“We are staying on top of it,” said Tom Dole, general manager of the Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission, which draws water from Guist Creek Lake.

“We are not experiencing … anything like the conditions that we read (about) and saw in Toledo,” said Kevin Shaw, general manager of the Grayson County Water District, which draws from Rough River Lake. “You could look at the water and see the algae. That is not the case in our reservoir.”

Indiana’s Department of Environmental Management surveyed its 33 public water utilities that rely on lakes in the wake of Toledo’s crisis, said Barry Sneed, IDEM spokesman. Bloomington’s water system was concerned about algae, so new samples were taken but no toxins or algae were detected, he added.

“We plan to keep in contact with systems that may be susceptible to algal blooms and if problems arise, we will work with the system to ensure treatment is adjusted to any address possible algal toxins,” he said.

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Map of Kentucky and Inidiana lakes with elevated toxic algae

Prevention

Besides ensuring drinking water utilities are prepared, experts say Kentucky needs to do more to prevent the blooms.

“We need to step up our game,” said Gail Brion, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Kentucky with an expertise in water-borne illnesses and water treatment.

She said the state needs to better curb the nitrogen and phosphorous that gets into waterways from sewage, animal waste, fertilizers and other sources.

“Once a bloom has happened, it is too late,” she said. “The toxins persist in the environment months after formation, so even if the algae leave, the toxins can remain.”

Scott said Kentucky regulators know they need better control of nutrient pollution and his department is working on a nutrient-management plan to do just that.

But environmentalists worry the state won’t adopt stringent enough pollution limits and that state environmental agency budgets will continue, further putting Kentucky communities at risk of a drinking water crises.

“We need limits on pollutants and inspectors on the ground,” said Judy Petersen, executive director of the Kentucky Waterways Alliance, which has joined other groups in suing the EPA over nutrient pollution in the Mississippi Basin, including Kentucky and Indiana. Otherwise, she said, Kentucky residents “are rolling the dice” on safe drinking water.

When it comes to cyanobacteria, it quickly gets complicated.

The toxin that wreaked havoc in northern Ohio — microcystin — can be produced by a variety of blue-green algae, not just the Microcystic found in Lake Erie. And other types of blue-green algae have different toxins that can cause health problems.

Toledo draws water from a shallow area of Lake Erie that became inundated by blue-green algae that produced microcystin, said Greg Boyer, chair of the chemistry department at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in New York.

The city’s water utility had no ability to switch to another intake, where there was less blue-green algae, said Boyer, who is also acting director for the Great Lakes Research Consortium, a research network.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency had warned Toledo about problems with its aging treatment system in June, writing to the city’s mayor of “the precarious condition” of the system and its “imminent vulnerability to failure.”

Boyer said utilities should monitor for the types of blue-green algae that can produce toxins. He said equipment can be bought for $5,000 to $25,000 that can provide a continuous flow of toxic algae data.

“Then, at what point do you worry about it? We deal, in most cases, where the blooms have to be fairly thick,” he said. “When you can see it.”

Further complicating matters, Scott said, is that the EPA has yet to establish a uniform testing method for the algae toxins, or safe drinking water standards. EPA is working on that, but “we believe they need to accelerate their decision making based on what we are seeing in Toledo and other places, including Kentucky,” Scott said.

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Toxic algae effects and precautions

Taylorsville Lake in Spencer County, a popular summer destination for water recreation, has fallen victim to an invasive and toxic algae over the past year. (Photo: Marty Pearl/Special to The CJ)

Louisville preparations

The Louisville Water Co. has an algae response plan that involves close tracking of algae in the Ohio River when it may be present: April to November.

The company’s aquatic ecologist, Roger Tucker, checks water samples through a microscope to determine what types of algae may be in the water, and whether they might cause any problems.

So far, the only algae problems Louisville Water has experienced comes from those that can make water taste or smell bad, Tucker said. This year, he said, there has been hardly any algae in the company’s river water.

Rivers are also less likely to have algae blooms because their water doesn’t get stagnant, said the water company’s chief scientist, Rengao Song. Sediment that often turns the Ohio brown blocks sunlight, preventing algae from growing, he said.

The water company’s Crescent Hill Treatment Plant is well-equipped to remove algae and any algae-caused toxins or chemicals that cause taste and odor changes, with processes that include absorptive activated carbon, he said.

Louisville also gets 30 percent of its water from wells deep under the Ohio River, where sand and gravel naturally filter tiny contaminants, including algae. That water feeds the company’s B.E. Payne treatment plant.

The water company is now working with engineering consultants on preliminary engineering for riverbank filtration for its Crescent Hill plant. Such a system should have no risk from toxic algae, Song said.

“The Louisville Water Co. has never detected any algae cells in its riverbank filtration water,” Song said.

Reach reporter James Bruggers at (502) 582-4645 or on Twitter @jbruggers.

Kentucky water systems that draw from lakes with toxic algae advisories:

• Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission (Guist Creek Lake)

• Springfield Water Works (Willisburg Lake)

• Glasgow Water Co. and Scottsville Water Department (Barren River Lake)

• Edmonson County Water District (Nolin River Lake)

• Columbia/Adair County Regional Water Commission and Campbellsville Municipal Water (Green River Lake)

• Grayson County Water District and Litchfield Water Works (Rough River Lake)

• Mount Sterling Water Works (Greenbriar Creek Reservoir)

Source: Kentucky Division of Water

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Real-Life ‘Purge’ Threatens Kentucky State Fair, Killing Spree Fears Spur FBI Investigation

By Tanya Diente | August 15, 2014 5:17 PM EST

Threats of a real-life “purge” that’s said to happen this weekend during the Kentucky State Fair had residents of Louisville fear for their lives and police officials have taken the matter into their own hands.

 

Police officers according to WLKY are said to be preparing for a “purge” that’s due to happen from Friday, at 8:30 p.m. until Saturday, at 6:30 p.m. News of the threat reportedly came from fliers and posters advertising the crime spree. Coincidentally, the “purge” is also scheduled in time for the opening celebration of the Kentucky State Fair. WLKY reports other information points out that it will also take place in upcoming concerts and local high school football games.

Tiffany Stephan, a local resident dismissed the purge threats as being real. She said it’s “nonsense to do some of the stuff from the movies like murders.”  

But the immense reactions over the threat have reportedly caught the attention of the police officials, the FBI and even the Jefferson County Public School (JCPS) districts. According to WLKY, some residents have even decided to arm themselves in case it happens.

However, Louisville Metro Police Sgt. Phil Russell assured residents that LMPD will investigate “anytime that there is a treat [sic] that affects” the community.

“Due to circumstances that have trended nationally in regards to flash mob violence, in light of what occurred this past spring here, we realize that these things can occur in an instant,” he said.

“If someone is threatening to harm members of our community, then we’re going to investigate them and pursue that as best we can,” he added.

Jeffersonville police and the FBI have reportedly also released a similar statement regarding the threat. Although there’s no mention of “specific mobilization tactics,” JCPS are said to be working closely with law enforcement and will act accordingly in case the “purge” does happen.

According to Inquisitr, Louisville MPD spokesman Dwight Mitchell also assured residents that they have nothing to fear since the department will be ready if incase the crime spree does take place. He claimed the department “take any threat seriously.”

“Fortunately we’re hoping that nothing happens as a result, but we’re prepared in case something does,” he said.

The Purge” as described in IMDB is a 2013 Hollywood movie with its story set sometime in the near future, where crime is considered legal for a period of 12 hours. People will be allowed to commit murder, rape, and assault. Even theft is legal and inmates are being set free during that time period.

To contact the editor, e-mail: editor@ibtimes.com

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LG&E and KU withdraw request for Green River facility

Still pursuing solar generating facility request

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (Aug. 12, 2014) — Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company informed the Kentucky Public Service Commission today that they will withdraw their application for a second natural gas combined-cycle generating facility, but plan to continue to pursue a solar generating facility.

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The announcement comes as a result of nine municipal utility customers’ decision to terminate in 2019 their wholesale power contracts with Kentucky Utilities. Those contracts total approximately 320 megawatts of peak demand.

LG&E and KU filed the request with the KPSC in January to build an approximately 700-megawatt NGCC generating facility in Muhlenberg County and a 10-megawatt solar photovoltaic facility in Mercer County. The need for the NGCC, which was expected to be completed by 2018 and cost approximately $700 million, was based in part on energy forecasts through 2035 that included serving the municipal customers.

Following the municipal utilities’ termination notices, LG&E and KU put the new generation requests on hold for 90 days to weigh the impacts of the termination notices on future generation plans. As a result, LG&E and KU have decided to withdraw their application for the NGCC. Plans remain in place for the $36 million solar facility at KU’s existing Brown facility. If approved, the solar unit would go online in 2016.

“We’ve analyzed the situation carefully and believe that it is in the best interest of all of our customers to withdraw our current application for the natural gas combined-cycle unit in Western Kentucky,” said Paul W. Thompson, chief operating officer. “Removing more than 300 megawatts of demand changes our load forecasts and thus delays the need for new generation.”

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