GLOBAL MARIJUANA MARCH, ON DERBY DAY, MAY 3RD, IN LOUISVILLE, KY!

*GLOBAL MARIJUANA MARCH LOUISVILLE KENTUCKY ON MAY 3

Presented by Kentucky Marijuana Party and DIVERSE SANCTUARY

Louisville, Kentucky, April 30, 2014–

The Global Marijuana March is coming to Louisville, Kentucky on Saturday May 3rd, 2014 which coincides with Kentucky Derby Day!

This will be the FIRST GLOBAL MARIJUANA MARCH that LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY has participated in.

Per Wikipedia:

Hundreds of thousands of people have participated in over 829 different cities in 72 countries worldwide since 1999

The following route will be adhered to as submitted to the Louisville Permit Office:

*Note: We will meet in front of Mid City Mall on Bardstown Road in Louisville, Kentucky at 10:30am sharp for the walk to begin at 11:00.  The permit ends at 12:30pm.  However, there are many restaurants, shops, and other places to visit in the Highlands neighborhood of Louisville!  So spend the day and enjoy!

Start at Mid City Mall at 1250 Bardstown Rd. Head northwest on Bardstown Rd toward Beechwood Ave
0.5 mi

Continue onto Baxter Ave
0.3 mi
(Corner of Baxter and Broadway)

Head northwest on Baxter Ave toward Cherokee Rd
220 ft.

Sharp right onto Cherokee Rd
0.9 mi.

Turn right onto Longest Ave
492 ft.

Turn right onto Bardstown Rd
To 1250 Bardstown Rd.
400 ft.

TOTAL 1.8 MILES

WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR PARKING.

ALL LOCAL LAWS MUST BE ADHERED TO WHILE PARTICIPATING!

PLEASE BE CONSIDERATE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD!

THIS EVENT IS INTENDED TO RAISE AWARENESS CONCERNING CANNABIS/HEMP/”MARIJUANA”, IT’S VALUE TO OUR SOCIETY AND REASONS TO “REPEAL” THE EXISTING CANNABIS LAWS VERSUS THE “LEGALIZATION” OF THE PLANT!

PLEASE COME OUT AND SUPPORT YOUR RIGHT TO GROW NON-GMO, NON-REGULATED CANNABIS!

# # #

If you would like more information about this topic, please contact Sheree M Krider at U.S. Marijuana Party of KENTUCKY (ph: 270-612-0524) or email at shereekrider@usmjparty.com.

*Diverse Sanctuary, Mary Thomas-Spears, Bowling Green, Kentucky, (ph: 270-904-0279)

On this day in history: 19 November 1863

Words of Lincoln console nation

 

 

On 19 November 1863 President Abraham Lincoln dedicated a cemetery on a Civil War battlefield where 51,000 Confederate and Union soldiers

were lost or wounded after just three days of fighting.  Most Americans cannot hear the name of the Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg without

thinking of Lincoln’s famous speech on that occasion.

 

“It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task

remaining before us… that this nation, under God,

shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government

of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not

perish from the earth “  President Abraham Lincoln

 

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, on this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition

that all men are created equal.”

“Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure.

We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who

here gave their lives, that that nation might live.

It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate – we cannot

hallow – this ground.

The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract.

The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.

It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion

to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that

this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that

government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

14TH ANNUAL GLOBAL FEST IN THE BARRENS RETURNS SEPTEMBER 6, 2014

 

Sunday, 17 August 2014 12:44

The 14th annual Global Fest in the Barrens (www.barrenglobalfest.com) returns to Glasgow-Barren County on Saturday, September 6, 2014 from 10:00 A.M. To 5:00 P.M. held on the Glasgow Public Square in Glasgow, Kentucky.  Global Fest is a Celebration of World Cultures and American Unity that promotes interaction among diverse individuals by discovering their similarities and differences. A fun filled day promoting Education, Entertainment, Children’s Activities, sharing and enjoying the Diversity in our community. New this year is recognition of Global Fest Deceased Members. We also welcome Pleasant Valley Baptist, Uno who will sponsor International Games and Crafts for youth and Caveland Church who will sponsor Children’s activities. New entertainment this year is Plain Jane Rock Band, Hector Montenegro, and the Head Liner this year is Perfect Fit Band.

Brother Jordan Woodie from Coral Hill Baptist will provide the Invocation and Julie Ann will sing the National Anthem.

Kentucky Music will provide the Sound System that will fill the air with Gospel Music provided by the Nesbitt Family from Tennessee.  Country Music will be provided by Silver Eagle Band, Author Hatfield and Buck Creek, will provide Blue Grass Music,

Hector Montenegro will sing love songs.

The Head liner this year is Perfect Fit who will present a Genre of R&B, Motown, Blues and Top Hits.

Omega Force Worlds Famous Strong Team will deliver a message of hope.

Sisters with Praise will deliver a message through song and dance.

Children’s World (next to Commonwealth Broadway Building) is sponsored by Glasgow Barren Co. Tourist and Convention Commission, Boys and Girls Club, Big Brother & Big Sister, Pleasant Valley Baptist of Uno, and Cave Land Church. Children will talk to Sponge Bob and Dora the Explorer look a likes. Broadway the Clown will entertain the children with balloons and candy. The Zippy Pets, Train Ride and Bungee Bounce Jump will return this year. Activities for the children will include Face painting, Inflatable, Piñata Burst, and International Crafts and Games.

Cultural Educational Exhibits include: African American, American, African, Chinese,  Japan, Mexican, Native Americans Indians, Nicaragua, Philippine, Thailand, German, Italian, Bosnian and Cambodian, French, and Spanish.   Movies of World Cultures will be showing at George J’s. Passports and Stamps will be available in the Gazebo near the stage.  A prize will be given away to the person who collects all the stamps in the Passport.

Tasty Cuisine will be provided by:  B&D BBQ, New Orleans Style Snowball & BBQ, Tater BBQ, C & D BBQ, Shogun- Japanese, Anna’s Greek Restaurant – Greek, Backyard Party Creation- Carnival food, and Papa John’s Pizza, La Nacional-Mexican Food and Horse Cave Baptist Church Male Ministry-Fish, George J’s Diner-French.

Support Local Glasgow Downtown Businesses. Global Fest welcomes two new restaurants in downtown Glasgow, Shogun and Miqueals Bistro.

The information desk is located on the right of the main stage. Register for door prizes, festival schedule information and Tourist Travel Logs.

Global Fest is a Free Family Community Festival.

CONTINUE READING…

Jack Richardson | Comer to Louisville: Drop dead

Jack Richardson IV, Special to The Courier-Journal 1:51 p.m. EDT August 12, 2014

Despite the claims made by some in Frankfort, Kentucky is not in good shape. The recession that began at the end of the Bush presidency has continued through the Obama administration has hit us here in the commonwealth particularly hard.

Businesses are not coming here. Jobs and our children are leaving. The time has come for all of us, regardless of party and regional bias, to join hands and pull together in the same direction to produce a better, brighter future for us all.

It was unfortunate therefore to read that Commonwealth Agriculture Commissioner Jamie Comer, a prospective GOP nominee for governor next year, at the launch of his announcement of intentions at the highly notable Fancy Farm Picnic, proudly proclaimed that our state’s next chief executive “will not be from Louisville.”

Where the next governor comes from and lives with his or her family is not nearly as important as what the next governor intends to do for Kentucky.

Gov. Steve Beshear has had eight years to bring reform and growth to our state. He hasn’t, even if a good part of the blame can be affixed to policies coming down from Washington.

Our state needs a new leader with an agenda to bring jobs back to this state, regardless of where they end up — in Jefferson County or in another part of this great state.

At Fancy Farm, Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer confirms he is running for governor. Aug. 2, 2014 Matt Stone, The Courier-Journal

Hopefully the Republicans, who I believe will be favored to win the next election, will find a candidate who understands that we are ONE state, with ONE agenda: to become a regional leader in finance, education, agriculture, in health care delivery, manufacturing and other areas that will keep jobs here and provide a future for our children and grandchildren.

A political strategy that pits the rest of the state against Louisville might have worked in years past. Kentucky is faced with many challenges and needs and deserves more than that now — things are too serious for more politics as usual.

Telling Louisville, Kentucky’s economic engine, that you need not apply is the mark of a not-ready-for-prime-time novice and a sad beginning.

Remember, Kentucky’s motto is “United We Stand, Divided We Fall.”

Jack Richardson IV is the former chair of the Jefferson County Republican Party.

CONTINUE READING…

After a toxin from blue-green algae shut down Toledo’s water system, regulators in Kentucky and Indiana take a look at their states’ drinking water utilities.

Kentucky steps up response to toxic algae risks

James Bruggers, jbruggers@courier-journal.com  2:04 p.m. EDT August 15, 2014

When toxic algae left 500,000 people in the Toledo, Ohio, area without drinking water for two days this month, one of Kentucky’s top environmental regulators took notice.

“I was sitting there on a Friday evening, hearing various things from various counterparts, and I was thinking this can happen in my state,” recalled R. Bruce Scott, commissioner of the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection. “What are we doing to be prepared?”

First thing the following Monday, Scott put that question to his staff, and Kentucky officials have been working since to get answers by combing through documents filed by many of the state’s 467 public drinking water systems, and reaching out to some with questions.

The inquiry steps up Kentucky’s response to its emerging problem of toxic algae blooms, first documented in the state in late 2012 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Taylorsville Lake.

The review puts drinking water safety front and center, in addition to state and Army Corps concerns about recreational exposure to blue-green algae — a cyanobacteria that can produce toxins causing skin or eye irritation, nausea, flu-like symptoms and liver damage.

The blooms occur with sunlight, slow-moving water and too many nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. They’re made worse by pollution from sewage treatment plants, septic systems and runoff from fertilized farms and lawns.

COURIER-JOURNAL

Toxic algae makes a comeback at Kentucky and Indiana lakes

For the second year in a row, Kentucky and the corps have issued recreational advisories on some lakes because of the blooms. In all, 10 Kentucky lakes carry the warnings, including Barren River, Nolin River, Green River, Rough River and Guist Creek lakes.

None is closed to swimming, fishing or boating. Instead, authorities advise not swallowing lake water and washing well after swimming.

Source water concerns

In response to a Kentucky Open Records request, state officials acknowledged 10 public drinking water systems serving thousands of customers in Kentucky are drawing water from lakes with algae advisories.

They include the Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission, Edmonson County Water District and the Grayson County Water District.

State officials said they know of no immediate drinking water threats from algae anywhere in Kentucky. And officials with the Louisville Water Co. — which provides water to about 850,000 people in Louisville and parts of Bullitt, Nelson, Oldham, Shelby and Spencer counties — said they do not have any issues with toxic algae.

But state officials said they want all Kentucky drinking water providers to be ready to handle algae problems, and that is why they are taking a closer look at Kentucky’s drinking water systems.

State officials acknowledged even more systems could be at potential risk, where monitoring for toxic algae has not yet occurred. And Scott said there could be gaps in technology or expertise at some utilities, especially smaller systems with fewer resources.

“We need to make sure we are properly educating and informing our smaller systems of what they need to do,” Scott said. “We are asking what can and should be done to make sure we are looking at everything that needs to be looked at.”

If Kentucky water utilities don’t have procedures for analyzing their source water for the different types of toxic algae, state officials recommend developing some.

Scott said they want to make sure all systems understand what treatment methods work, and have an emergency response plan if their water becomes unsafe for drinking.

Rural water systems contacted by The Courier-Journal said their customers don’t need to worry.

“We are staying on top of it,” said Tom Dole, general manager of the Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission, which draws water from Guist Creek Lake.

“We are not experiencing … anything like the conditions that we read (about) and saw in Toledo,” said Kevin Shaw, general manager of the Grayson County Water District, which draws from Rough River Lake. “You could look at the water and see the algae. That is not the case in our reservoir.”

Indiana’s Department of Environmental Management surveyed its 33 public water utilities that rely on lakes in the wake of Toledo’s crisis, said Barry Sneed, IDEM spokesman. Bloomington’s water system was concerned about algae, so new samples were taken but no toxins or algae were detected, he added.

“We plan to keep in contact with systems that may be susceptible to algal blooms and if problems arise, we will work with the system to ensure treatment is adjusted to any address possible algal toxins,” he said.

COURIER-JOURNAL

Map of Kentucky and Inidiana lakes with elevated toxic algae

Prevention

Besides ensuring drinking water utilities are prepared, experts say Kentucky needs to do more to prevent the blooms.

“We need to step up our game,” said Gail Brion, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Kentucky with an expertise in water-borne illnesses and water treatment.

She said the state needs to better curb the nitrogen and phosphorous that gets into waterways from sewage, animal waste, fertilizers and other sources.

“Once a bloom has happened, it is too late,” she said. “The toxins persist in the environment months after formation, so even if the algae leave, the toxins can remain.”

Scott said Kentucky regulators know they need better control of nutrient pollution and his department is working on a nutrient-management plan to do just that.

But environmentalists worry the state won’t adopt stringent enough pollution limits and that state environmental agency budgets will continue, further putting Kentucky communities at risk of a drinking water crises.

“We need limits on pollutants and inspectors on the ground,” said Judy Petersen, executive director of the Kentucky Waterways Alliance, which has joined other groups in suing the EPA over nutrient pollution in the Mississippi Basin, including Kentucky and Indiana. Otherwise, she said, Kentucky residents “are rolling the dice” on safe drinking water.

When it comes to cyanobacteria, it quickly gets complicated.

The toxin that wreaked havoc in northern Ohio — microcystin — can be produced by a variety of blue-green algae, not just the Microcystic found in Lake Erie. And other types of blue-green algae have different toxins that can cause health problems.

Toledo draws water from a shallow area of Lake Erie that became inundated by blue-green algae that produced microcystin, said Greg Boyer, chair of the chemistry department at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in New York.

The city’s water utility had no ability to switch to another intake, where there was less blue-green algae, said Boyer, who is also acting director for the Great Lakes Research Consortium, a research network.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency had warned Toledo about problems with its aging treatment system in June, writing to the city’s mayor of “the precarious condition” of the system and its “imminent vulnerability to failure.”

Boyer said utilities should monitor for the types of blue-green algae that can produce toxins. He said equipment can be bought for $5,000 to $25,000 that can provide a continuous flow of toxic algae data.

“Then, at what point do you worry about it? We deal, in most cases, where the blooms have to be fairly thick,” he said. “When you can see it.”

Further complicating matters, Scott said, is that the EPA has yet to establish a uniform testing method for the algae toxins, or safe drinking water standards. EPA is working on that, but “we believe they need to accelerate their decision making based on what we are seeing in Toledo and other places, including Kentucky,” Scott said.

COURIER-JOURNAL

Toxic algae effects and precautions

Taylorsville Lake in Spencer County, a popular summer destination for water recreation, has fallen victim to an invasive and toxic algae over the past year. (Photo: Marty Pearl/Special to The CJ)

Louisville preparations

The Louisville Water Co. has an algae response plan that involves close tracking of algae in the Ohio River when it may be present: April to November.

The company’s aquatic ecologist, Roger Tucker, checks water samples through a microscope to determine what types of algae may be in the water, and whether they might cause any problems.

So far, the only algae problems Louisville Water has experienced comes from those that can make water taste or smell bad, Tucker said. This year, he said, there has been hardly any algae in the company’s river water.

Rivers are also less likely to have algae blooms because their water doesn’t get stagnant, said the water company’s chief scientist, Rengao Song. Sediment that often turns the Ohio brown blocks sunlight, preventing algae from growing, he said.

The water company’s Crescent Hill Treatment Plant is well-equipped to remove algae and any algae-caused toxins or chemicals that cause taste and odor changes, with processes that include absorptive activated carbon, he said.

Louisville also gets 30 percent of its water from wells deep under the Ohio River, where sand and gravel naturally filter tiny contaminants, including algae. That water feeds the company’s B.E. Payne treatment plant.

The water company is now working with engineering consultants on preliminary engineering for riverbank filtration for its Crescent Hill plant. Such a system should have no risk from toxic algae, Song said.

“The Louisville Water Co. has never detected any algae cells in its riverbank filtration water,” Song said.

Reach reporter James Bruggers at (502) 582-4645 or on Twitter @jbruggers.

Kentucky water systems that draw from lakes with toxic algae advisories:

• Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission (Guist Creek Lake)

• Springfield Water Works (Willisburg Lake)

• Glasgow Water Co. and Scottsville Water Department (Barren River Lake)

• Edmonson County Water District (Nolin River Lake)

• Columbia/Adair County Regional Water Commission and Campbellsville Municipal Water (Green River Lake)

• Grayson County Water District and Litchfield Water Works (Rough River Lake)

• Mount Sterling Water Works (Greenbriar Creek Reservoir)

Source: Kentucky Division of Water

CONTINUE READING….

Real-Life ‘Purge’ Threatens Kentucky State Fair, Killing Spree Fears Spur FBI Investigation

By Tanya Diente | August 15, 2014 5:17 PM EST

Threats of a real-life “purge” that’s said to happen this weekend during the Kentucky State Fair had residents of Louisville fear for their lives and police officials have taken the matter into their own hands.

 

Police officers according to WLKY are said to be preparing for a “purge” that’s due to happen from Friday, at 8:30 p.m. until Saturday, at 6:30 p.m. News of the threat reportedly came from fliers and posters advertising the crime spree. Coincidentally, the “purge” is also scheduled in time for the opening celebration of the Kentucky State Fair. WLKY reports other information points out that it will also take place in upcoming concerts and local high school football games.

Tiffany Stephan, a local resident dismissed the purge threats as being real. She said it’s “nonsense to do some of the stuff from the movies like murders.”  

But the immense reactions over the threat have reportedly caught the attention of the police officials, the FBI and even the Jefferson County Public School (JCPS) districts. According to WLKY, some residents have even decided to arm themselves in case it happens.

However, Louisville Metro Police Sgt. Phil Russell assured residents that LMPD will investigate “anytime that there is a treat [sic] that affects” the community.

“Due to circumstances that have trended nationally in regards to flash mob violence, in light of what occurred this past spring here, we realize that these things can occur in an instant,” he said.

“If someone is threatening to harm members of our community, then we’re going to investigate them and pursue that as best we can,” he added.

Jeffersonville police and the FBI have reportedly also released a similar statement regarding the threat. Although there’s no mention of “specific mobilization tactics,” JCPS are said to be working closely with law enforcement and will act accordingly in case the “purge” does happen.

According to Inquisitr, Louisville MPD spokesman Dwight Mitchell also assured residents that they have nothing to fear since the department will be ready if incase the crime spree does take place. He claimed the department “take any threat seriously.”

“Fortunately we’re hoping that nothing happens as a result, but we’re prepared in case something does,” he said.

The Purge” as described in IMDB is a 2013 Hollywood movie with its story set sometime in the near future, where crime is considered legal for a period of 12 hours. People will be allowed to commit murder, rape, and assault. Even theft is legal and inmates are being set free during that time period.

To contact the editor, e-mail: editor@ibtimes.com

CONTINUE READING…

LG&E and KU withdraw request for Green River facility

Still pursuing solar generating facility request

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (Aug. 12, 2014) — Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company informed the Kentucky Public Service Commission today that they will withdraw their application for a second natural gas combined-cycle generating facility, but plan to continue to pursue a solar generating facility.

lge_ku_ppl_tag

The announcement comes as a result of nine municipal utility customers’ decision to terminate in 2019 their wholesale power contracts with Kentucky Utilities. Those contracts total approximately 320 megawatts of peak demand.

LG&E and KU filed the request with the KPSC in January to build an approximately 700-megawatt NGCC generating facility in Muhlenberg County and a 10-megawatt solar photovoltaic facility in Mercer County. The need for the NGCC, which was expected to be completed by 2018 and cost approximately $700 million, was based in part on energy forecasts through 2035 that included serving the municipal customers.

Following the municipal utilities’ termination notices, LG&E and KU put the new generation requests on hold for 90 days to weigh the impacts of the termination notices on future generation plans. As a result, LG&E and KU have decided to withdraw their application for the NGCC. Plans remain in place for the $36 million solar facility at KU’s existing Brown facility. If approved, the solar unit would go online in 2016.

“We’ve analyzed the situation carefully and believe that it is in the best interest of all of our customers to withdraw our current application for the natural gas combined-cycle unit in Western Kentucky,” said Paul W. Thompson, chief operating officer. “Removing more than 300 megawatts of demand changes our load forecasts and thus delays the need for new generation.”

CONTINUE READING…

Fancy Farm: Ag Commissioner James Comer Officially Enters 2015 Governor’s Race

By Jonathan Meador

Agriculture Commissioner James Comer beside his wife, T.J., as he announces his bid for governor.

Credit Alix Mattingly/WFPL News

  FANCY FARM—Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer officially announced his bid for governor Saturday at the 134th annual Fancy Farm political picnic. He’s the third candidate to launch an gubernatorial bid in the 2015 race.

“It’s been my dream come true to be your commissioner of agriculture,” Comer said before a packed audience at the St. Jerome Church picnic grounds. “And I view the people of Western Kentucky as our family. So [my wife] T.J. and I have chosen this time, and this place, to say to all of you, I will be a candidate for governor in 2015.”

The announcement now pits Comer, a Republican who succeeded Richie Farmer in 2012, against Hal Heiner, a Republican who narrowly lost to Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer in a 2010 election.

Earlier: James Comer Jabs Opponents Ahead of Fancy Farm

Thus far, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway is the lone Democratic candidate in the race.

In his Fancy Farm speech, Conway neglected the looming specter of a Comer candidacy—nor did he address Heiner—in lieu of trumpeting his accomplishments as attorney general; namely his office’s successes in combating online child pornography and cracking down on prescription pain pill abuse, he said.

Comer said he will officially file his paperwork Sept. 9 at an inaugural campaign event in Tompkinsville, Ky. According to Kentucky law, gubernatorial candidates must include a lieutenant governor in their ticket when they file their candidacy.

Speculation has centered on Sen. Chris McDaniel, a Republican state senator from Taylor Mill who owns a construction business. Elected in 2012, McDaniel is also chairman state Senate’s Budget Review Subcommittee on General Government, Finance, and Public Protection.

“You know, people have a lot of rumors out there,” McDaniel said, adding that he’s been in talks with Comer about joining the ticket. “But, you know, right now I’m focused on doing my job in the Senate, I obviously own a business back home, and we’ve got a lot of races ahead of us this fall, so we’ll look forward to those.”

Comer took aim at Heiner in his Fancy Farm speech, saying that the next governor won’t be “a millionaire from Louisville.”

Comer denied that the comment suggests that his campaign is attempting to employ an urban-rural schism between himself and Heiner and Conway, both of whom live in Louisville.”

“I’ve got a lot of support in Louisville,” Comer said.

Heiner was not permitted to speak at this year’s event. Fancy Farm political director Mark Wilson said the event only allows sitting elected officials to speak. But just last year, GOP Senate candidate Matt Bevin, a conservative bell manufacturer who lost a primary race against U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell earlier this year, spoke at 2013’s picnic. 

Bevin was also making rounds at Saturday’s picnic, and said he’s considering a running for governor, too.

“I’m considering it and I’m not considering it,” Bevin said.

Tags: 

Fancy Farm 2014

Agriculture Commissioner James Comer

Hal Heiner

Attorney General Jack Conway

2015 Kentucky gubernatorial race

CONTINUE READING…

Colo. man moves hemp operation to Ky. to make medicine

by Melissa Swan

WHAS11.com

Posted on August 12, 2014 at 12:11 AM

Updated Tuesday, Aug 12 at 12:12 AM

Related:

LOUISVILLE, Ky.  (WHAS11) — A man form Colorado is staking his time, money and experience on a farm in Kentucky all to make medicine from hemp.

“I use the word phenomenon.  Agriculture phenomenon, in Kentucky’s very, very near future,” Josh Stanley said. 

 

In Colorado, Stanley is known as a medical marijuana pioneer.

 

Stanley and four of his brothers have cultivated many forms of medical pot to help control seizures in children. They said they believe it can help others, including cancer patients and veterans.

“It worked for depression, it worked to curb the post traumatic stress disorder, the flair ups, it worked so well we were astonished,” Stanley said.

Earlier this year, Stanley was front and center in Frankfort testifying before Kentucky lawmakers about the Colorado Cannabis.

In an exclusive WHAS11 interview, Stanley talked about moving the base of his operation to Kentucky.  But here, he said, he isn’t concentrating on medical marijuana which is still illegal in Kentucky.  Instead, he will shift his focus to hemp.

“I don’t use the cannabis word or the marijuana word.  That turns people off immediately.  What we’re dealing in is hemp. Both in nutritional and medical purposes,” he said.

He’s investing in Kentucky, partnering with farmers on two pilot project and in the market to buy land.

“Kentucky is the place to be and Kentucky is going to be the example for the rest of the country.  I am confident of that,” Stanley said.

Stanley said his interest in medicinal hemp began with his own back injury. He was using pharmaceutical drugs when his friend told him to try hemp.

He said within three weeks he was off all pain pills.

Since then, Stanley and his brothers have been at the forefront of creating strains of medical marijuana in Colorado with drastically reduced levels of THC (the substance that gets you high) and turning it into medicine. 

Now, he said Kentucky is on the forefront of making medicine – from hemp.

“There are so many unanswered questions, but we are not going to answer them unless we get to it. What my company, and now non-profit organization, seeks to do is lend a hand,” he said.

This fall the hemp from this farm will be turned into an oil – CBD oil — and distributed to children and veterans.

“My hope is in the pilot project that we can take care of 400. We need to be able to take care of 400,000, but that’s OK.  It’s a start. You have to start somewhere,” Stanley said.  

CONTINUE READING…

Mitch McConnell’s coal-fired claptrap: Dirty fuels and stupid politics in Kentucky

Monday, Aug 11, 2014 10:22 AM CST

Mitch McConnell and Allison Lundergan Grimes both love coal — and it’s making them say very silly things

Simon Maloy

The Kentucky Senate race is basically an argument over coal. A big, stupid argument over coal.

Late last week, Yahoo! News’ Chris Moody reported that Elaine Chao, wife to incumbent Sen. Mitch McConnell, serves on the board of Bloomberg Philanthropies, “which has plunged $50 million into the Sierra Club’s ‘Beyond Coal’ initiative, an advocacy effort with the expressed goal of killing the coal industry.” Taken in isolation, this is good, charitable work that, to be frank, you wouldn’t expect a former member of George W. Bush’s Cabinet and Heritage Foundation fellow to be involved in.

And according to Bloomberg Philanthropies, the anti-coal effort is getting results. “The Beyond Coal campaign has retired 161 coal plants,” a February report from the organization states. “The shift away from coal is also helping to save lives. These retired coal plants will save 4,400 lives, prevent 6,800 heart attacks, and prevent close to 70,000 asthma attacks each year.”

Those are good things! The filthy business of coal mining and burning are causing lots of health problems in Kentucky and other Appalachian states, like higher rates of cancer and birth defects that studies have traced to the release of heavy metals from surface mining. The climate change impact is also significant, as coal-fired plants are the top source of carbon emissions in the United States. Less cancer, fewer heart attacks, decreased risk of climate change-caused catastrophe – great job, Elaine Chao! Wouldn’t have pegged you as one of the good guys.

Of course, that’s not at all how this is playing in Kentucky, where coal is a big part of the state economy and pandering to coal interests is what needs to happen if you want to get elected to statewide office. Thus we have the spectacle of the McConnell campaign vigorously and adamantly denying that its candidate’s wife had any involvement whatsoever in this philanthropic effort to not cover Kentucky with soot and asthma:

“The decisions to make those grants by the Bloomberg philanthropies were made before she joined the board and she played no role in the decision to grant them,” McConnell spokesman Don Stewart told Yahoo News. “Sen. McConnell has a longstanding, principled record of defending coal families and jobs. Decisions made by a board before Sec. Chao ever joined do not change that and as the Obama administration will tell you, he hasn’t let up an iota in his defense of Kentucky coal families and jobs.”

That’s a bit of a cutesy position to take, given that they’re tacitly acknowledging that Chao joined Bloomberg Philanthropies after their anti-coal activism was established. And local Kentucky media reported that Chao was “on the charity’s board when at least half of the grants were made to the Sierra Club.” But this is how coal politics work. You have to reject and denounce the life- and environment-saving charitable work done by the group your wife works for.

(The Louisville Courier-Journal pointed out that Bloomberg Philanthropies also does anti-tobacco activism, which is at cross-purposes with McConnell’s “staunch” defense of Kentucky tobacco interests.)

I certainly don’t want to leave the impression that this is a McConnell-only problem, though. Being a Democrat in Kentucky means you have to play this same game, and McConnell’s opponent, Alison Lundergan Grimes, is positioning herself as a stronger supporter of coal than he is. “Senator, let’s set the record straight. I’m the only pro-coal candidate in this race,” Grimes said last week at an event with members of the United Mine Workers of America. When the Environmental Protection Agency unveiled its new rule capping carbon emissions for existing power plants, Grimes cut radio ads blasting President Obama: “Your EPA is targeting Kentucky coal with pie in the sky regulations that are impossible to achieve.”

Grimes’ pro-coal campaigning led to one of the dumber campaign fights in recent memory. Her campaign put together a newspaper ad touting her support of coal interests that featured a photo of a miner holding a chunk of anthracite. It turned out that picture was actually a stock photo of a European male model pretending to be a miner, and the Grimes campaign replaced it before it went to print. But Politico got hold of the story and … well, you know what comes next. “The stock photograph could undermine Grimes’s messaging as Republicans raise doubts about the authenticity of her pro-coal position,” Politico reported, with complete earnestness.

McConnell’s campaign jumped on this ridiculous issue, with the candidate himself getting in on the action. “My opponent has been in Hollywood so much lately that she really can’t tell the difference between a coal miner and a European male model,” McConnell said at a campaign event. The Grimes campaign fought back. “The stock photo war of 2014 escalated in Kentucky on Thursday night, as Alison Lundergan Grimes’ campaign attacked Sen. Mitch McConnell’s team for using European stock photos in three Facebook posts,” reported Politico (obviously).

This is where pro-coal campaigning takes you, I guess. It would be nice if the debate in Kentucky were on how to best transition the state away from filthy, toxic fuels. But, the politics being what they are, instead they’re fighting over who’s more the enthusiastic supporter of an industry that is destroying the environment and making the people in close proximity to it sick.

Simon Maloy

Simon Maloy is Salon’s political writer. Email him at smaloy@salon.com. Follow him on Twitter at @SimonMaloy.

More Simon Maloy.

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LOUISVILLE, Ky. — A Kentucky company used local tobacco to help produce an experimental serum to fight Ebola,

 

 

 

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — A Kentucky company used local tobacco to help produce an experimental serum to fight Ebola, which may help save two American aid workers stricken with the deadly disease.

David Howard, a spokesman for Reynolds American Services, said Owensboro-based Kentucky BioProcessing complied with a request from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta and Samaritan’s Purse this week “to provide a limited amount” of the compound, called ZMapp.

Kentucky BioProcessing, which was acquired by North Carolina-based Reynolds American Inc. in January, does contract work for many clients, including ZMapp maker Mapp Biopharmaceutical of San Diego.

Howard couldn’t confirm that the compound was used on the aid workers, and Emory officials didn’t respond by deadline to a call or email seeking confirmation. But The Associated Press, CNN and other media outlets reported that the aid workers have gotten the serum and have improved.

The fact that a Kentucky company focused on plant-based science played a part “is fantastic,” said Kenneth Palmer, a University of Louisville professor who is involved in tobacco-based research in Owensboro but not in this project. “The more that (medicines) made in plants are used, the better the acceptance. … It gives tangible evidence of how what we do can be applied to help people.”

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, pointed out that ZMapp is not a proven treatment for Ebola but said it’s a good example of the intriguing science of growing medicines in tobacco plants.

“We’d love to see tobacco used for health,” said Frieden, who was in Hazard, Ky., on Tuesday for a series of talks on health problems in Appalachia. But he added, “We don’t have proven treatments or vaccines against Ebola. … This Ebola outbreak is the biggest, worst, most complicated one that the world has ever seen.”

Howard said tobacco helps in the production of ZMapp, acting like a “photocopier” to mass-produce proteins used to make the serum. Palmer said three, single-gene antibodies are put into trays of plants at Kentucky BioProcessing and replicate the antibodies after about 10 days.

Palmer likened it to antibodies being produced in the bodies of people or animals after an infection.

“What the plants are doing is pumping out the antibodies,” Palmer said. “The plants are used to make the antibodies, and then they purify the antibodies.”

“It’s faster than more traditional methods,” Howard added. “It allows for rapid growth of proteins … on a reasonably large scale.”

At the direction of Mapp, the Kentucky company developed a precursor to ZMapp, called MB-003, which was tested in non-human primates and showed good results, published last August in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Researchers said the treatment previously had been shown to protect all the primates when it was given an hour after exposure to Ebola, and two-thirds of them when given 48 hours after exposure.

‘We’d love to see tobacco used for health.’

Dr. Tom Frieden, director Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

In the study published last year, researchers said, 43 percent of infected primates recovered after getting the treatment intravenously up to 120 hours after they were infected and had developed symptoms.

ZMapp was never tested in humans, but even before the latest Ebola outbreak, the companies had planned later this year to begin the federal process to get the drug approved, Howard said.

Meanwhile, tobacco plants also will be used to develop a gel to prevent the transmission of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. University of Louisville researchers announced this week they will lead the international effort, which is being funded by a five-year, $14.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The gel — designed to be used during sexual intercourse by people at risk for HIV — is developed using a synthetic copy of a protein found in red algae shown to act against HIV in the lab.

Research is also underway at Louisville using tobacco plants to produce a cheaper version of the vaccine against human papillomavirus, which causes most cervical cancer.

University of Louisville President James Ramsey said all of the tobacco-based research is exciting, particularly in a state where smoking kills at the highest rate in the nation.

“It is ironic,” Ramsey said in an interview Tuesday. “We’ve been a tobacco state, and it’s been such a part of our economy, and it’s pretty amazing that they can take tobacco and potentially solve some of the biggest health problems around the world.”

Laura Ungar also reports for The (Louisville, Ky.) Courier-Journal

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More than 200,000 rural Kentuckians have no access to public water systems

By Greg Kocher

gkocher1@herald-leader.comAugust 4, 2014

FRENCHBURG — Debbie and Mike Weiner can see Cave Run Lake from their house, but they depend on rainfall for their water.

Rainwater runs off the roof to their gutters and through pipes to collect in an underground, 1,000-gallon cistern in the backyard. The water is then pumped into the house for bathing, washing clothes and the toilet. They use only bottled water for drinking and cooking.

“Yesterday it rained a lot,” Debbie Weiner said in a recent interview. “That’s when I washed my bedclothes and a lot of the things in the house that needed to be washed.”

The Weiners are among a shrinking number in Kentucky — an estimated 93,600 households, or more than 234,000 people — who are not connected to a public water system. Their house on Leatherwood Road in rural Menifee County is about eight miles from the nearest water line and 20 miles north of Frenchburg, the county seat.

The Weiners desperately want to be connected to a public water system. At least one test showed harmful E. coli bacteria in their tap water, despite reverse-osmosis filtration, ultraviolet light and other purification measures. The couple haven’t used the cistern water for cooking or drinking since 2012, when Debbie, 60, a former adult-education instructor at Morehead State University, was diagnosed with an incurable bladder disease. She keeps a log of the politicians and others she has contacted in her quest for “city water.”

The Weiners highlight one of the gaps in water service in the United States.

The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that 14 percent of the population relies on wells, cisterns or some unsustainable source for water, said Stephen Gasteyer, an associate professor of sociology at Michigan State University. Gasteyer has studied community and natural resources management.

“It’s an embarrassment for us as a nation to have people in the 21st century who don’t have access to water and sanitation,” Gasteyer said. “But from the perspective of a small water system, they are already strapped. We had major infrastructure investments in this country in the 1930s … through the 1970s. Well, a lot of that infrastructure is now wearing out. You have water systems of all sizes in this country that are struggling to stay in the black. So taking on the extra load of people who are a ways out of town seems like a real burden.”

In Kentucky, about 5 percent of residents are not connected to a community water system, according to figures provided by Andy Lange, assistant director of the Kentucky Rural Water Association. Only California has a lower percentage of residents who are not served by community water systems.

(By contrast, almost a quarter of Kentucky’s population — 23 percent — has no access to high-speed Internet. Kentucky ranks 46th in broadband availability.)

Many water lines were extended into unserved rural areas during the 2000s, when Kentucky had money from the national tobacco settlement. That money is gone, although there is a state revolving fund and other federal programs to extend water lines.

Trouble is, the cost of running water lines to remote spots often isn’t cost-effective, said John Horne, a Nicholasville engineer whose firm has designed extensions in Jessamine County.

“To construct a distribution main, depending on the terrain and how much rock there is, it can run as much as $50,000 to $75,000 per mile,” Horne said. The price can easily double in rough terrain common in Eastern Kentucky, including Menifee County.

Community development block grants and other programs are available, but potential projects must qualify, Horne said.

“The government looks at feasibility. If it’s not feasible, … they don’t do it,” he said.

Even if lines were extended to isolated pockets, low usage from a small number of customers poses other problems, Horne said.

“Especially on long, dead-end lines, if they can’t use up all the water in the pipe in, say, two days, then it gets stale and then you get problems with odor and taste,” Horne said. “Then you have to flush all that out and waste it.”

Debbie Weiner has an answer ready when asked why taxpayer dollars should be used to pay for water lines to a remote spot where she and her husband choose to live.

“I think those tax dollars should pay for an American citizen to live anywhere they choose if I can open the paper and see that millions of dollars go to study garbage dumps that are closed,” Weiner said. She was referring to environmental risk assessments performed on closed landfills.

She also said that millions of dollars in state incentives will help Alltech put a new bourbon distillery and aquaculture and poultry farms in Pikeville. The state will provide as much as $5.73 million for an access road wide enough to accommodate tractor-trailers to a new industrial park, and $8 million for a bridge to connect an access road with U.S. 23. The incentives will bring new jobs.

Weiner doesn’t begrudge anyone jobs, but she said safe drinking water should be a high priority.

“Then let’s build a better Rupp Arena,” she said, referring to the now-stalled project that would have leveraged public and private dollars for a new Lexington home for the University of Kentucky men’s basketball team.

Frenchburg Mayor Edward Bryant said Leatherwood Road is one of only two rural roads in Menifee County that are without water. To extend water to the end of that road deep within Daniel Boone National Forest could cost more than $1 million, Bryant said.

“They’re in a remote area. There’s only, roughly, 24 or 25 homes, and out of that there are 12 or 15 people that live there full-time,” Bryant said. “We can’t put a burden on the current water customers to extend that. It’s a tough situation.”

Nevertheless, he said, the Gateway Regional Water Management Council has put the Leatherwood area on a list of projects.

“For Frenchburg to get over there, we’re going to have to cross that (Cave Run) lake some way,” Bryant said. “That means a pump station and a water tower, then you’ve got a problem of meeting the state regulations, keeping the water fresh for such a few. … It’s just not feasible right now unless somebody comes along with a barrel of money.”

In the meantime, because rainfall is unpredictable, the Weiners supplement their water supply. When rain is scarce and the cistern runs low, Mike Weiner, 65, a retired car salesman, drives about 12 miles to buy water from a bulk station. For $2, he can put 300 gallons in a tank that sits on the bed of his pickup. Then he hauls the sloshing load home to empty into the cistern.

The Weiners moved to Menifee County from Nashville so Debbie could be closer to her mother, who lives in Mount Sterling. Her mother previously owned property in the Leatherwood Road neighborhood where the Weiners eventually bought a lot and built their house. The couple knew the area had no public water when they moved there in 1998, but they thought it would be only a matter of time before they could hook onto “city water.”

Debbie Weiner said she sometimes goes to the Facebook page for Water.org, the organization co-founded by actor Matt Damon to provide safe drinking water and toilets to Ethiopia, Haiti and India and other foreign countries.

She posted a comment to the page July 16 that read, “Wish I had city water here in the United States, in Frenchburg, Kentucky.”

She hopes a wealthy celebrity will see her comment and take action to donate money to bring water to the end of Leatherwood Road.

Greg Kocher: (859) 231-3305. Twitter: @HLpublicsafety.

Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/08/04/3365284/public-water-systems-still-dont.html#storylink=cpy